Precise Long Cuts?

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I need to make a precise cut of wood to be 24" long and only 4 1/2" wide.
Right now all I really have is a 10" compound miter saw (as far as saws are concerned) - which obviously won't do.
I did just pick up a very nice Porter Cable router!
So now I am sort of stuck realizing I am going to need to buy yet again another power tool :)
I am avoiding buying a table saw because I don't want to get the cheapest one ($99 Ryobi). I would much rather save up and buy one later on that is nicer.
I have considered buying a circular saw ($50 Skil) that has an Accu-Sight. Along with that I will setup a fence. Do you think that is a good plan / option? Any other tips that you guys have for me? This is my first wood working project and I am anxious to get started with it!
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How precise? What's it for?

And that's a problem exactly how? <g>

Good plan. Buy good tools, and you cry once when you open your wallet. Buy crappy tools, and you cry every time you use them.

Depending on how precise you really need it, the circular saw may work for you (make sure to clamp the wood down securely), or you may be better off finding a buddy with a table saw who can cut it for you. Also, if you buy the wood from a real lumber yard (not Home Depot, Lowe's, etc) they will be able to cut it to size for you, for a fee of course. If you could provide more specifics about what you're using this board for, we could advise you better on the degree of precision needed and the best way to achieve it.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller wrote:

I am going to be *trying* to make a foot stool. The 24" X 4 1/2" length is for one of the sides.
There will need to be a top that rests perfectly on top of it.
Adam
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IF you can get it close with a hand saw/jib saw/sawzall/whateverthehellsaw, then IF you have a straight table edge, you can clamp the material down to the table and use a trim bit in your router to true up the edge.
I would really suggest that you do NOT, repeat NOT use the kitchen table for this step.
Or...see if a friend can make the cuts for you...
or check Craigs List in your area.
Mike
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You can make that cut just fine with a handsaw and then clean it up with a jointer plane. You could also use the router to clean up the edge if you have something you could clamp on as a guide. A pattern makers router bit would be useful.
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Adam wrote:

You can do reasonably good work with a skilsaw. Clamp a guide board to the work and they cut pretty straight. Make sure the blade is at 90 degrees. There is an adjustment that allows miter cuts. Adjust it to do square cuts. Or, go for used. $99 will get you a decent table saw or radial arm saw off Craigs List. Or, for just 24 inches, you can do it by hand and clean up with a plane.
David Starr
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Cool. One of the first things I made was a step stool for our, then, 2-years old girl.
And like the other guy said, you really are smart to wait to get a half decent table saw. You'll decide, of course, from all the advice but I would suggest you consider spending a little more than the 50 bucks and purchase a reasonably good 'skill' saw (not skill brand). You'd be able to make a reasonably good rip cut with it. Then you could use a wood rasp or, better yet, a plane to get a rather good edge that would allow you to make that stool. Then, Bob's your uncle!
It's pretty good to be starting out on what could be a satisfying life-long adventure in learning and making things with your hands (and tools!).
Best, David Todtman
wrote:

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On Thu, 22 Nov 2007 03:48:39 GMT, "David Todtman"

This is the best straight edge tool guide I know:
<http://www.womeninwoodworking.com/tips/startingpoints7.cfm
I make them double-sided, for a circular saw and router.
So, he'd make the cut with the saw, turn the guide around, and take the last 1/32" off with a straight bit in the router. Since the OP dosen't have a table saw, he'd simply make one for each tool, using a clean factory plywood edge as the straight edge. The edge of the hardboard is cut the first time, forming a reference to align to the planned cut line.
I have lots of big tools and hand planes, and still keep some of these around in several lengths for site work, large sheets, and squaring table top glue-ups.
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wrote: Then, Bob's your uncle!
.....Molly's your aunt?
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A circular saw with a good straight edge can be an excellent all around tool. Many people use levels as their straight edge, and I'm seriously considering trying that myself.
Actually, with a straight bit your router can make the cut. You'll need a good straight edge fence, but you'll need that sooner or later anyway.
Don't buy a cheap table saw, they're not worth it. Mine's practically worthless when it comes to anything beyond basic ripping. (I'm surprised I got as good of results as I did cross cutting today.) A circular saw, OTOH, can be an excellent addition to your shop and woodworking tasks. I've got a Skil circular saw and it's a very good tool.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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Adam wrote:

wide.
> Right now all I really have is a 10" compound miter

> I did just pick up a very nice Porter Cable router!

> So now I am sort of stuck realizing I am going to need to buy yet again another power tool :)

> cheapest one ($99 Ryobi). I would much rather save up and buy one

> Accu-Sight. Along with that I will setup a fence. Do you think that is

with
"Puckdropper" added:

around
seriously
need
anyway.
practically
good
Build your own straight edge using 1/4" plywood.
Straight from "Ask This old House.
Rip a 12" x 96" and a 6" x 96" piece of plywood.
Glue pieces together with 4" exposed edge on one side, 2" on the other.
Cut one side and then the other trimming some of the exposed edges.
The cut edges are are not the guide edges.
BTW, use an 8 ft alum angle as the straight edge to make the first cuts.
Lew
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I'm a little fuzzy on how this is supposed to be... Is it something like:
****** ************
Where your saw/router rides above the bottom row of stars, next to the top rows?
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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"Puckdropper" wrote:

the
The saw bed plate outside edge rides against the 6" ply and the bottom of the bed plate rides on the 12" ply.
The short side of the bed plate rides on the short extension and the long side on the other.
The first pass will cut off the excess ply leaving an edge that will duplicate the saw cut line which IMHO, makes it idiot proof (No need to remember the offset which will be 1" on one side)
HTH
Lew
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Like this: http://www.womeninwoodworking.com/tips/startingpoints7.cfm
I have used one like this for years and it works great. Currently made of plywood but the next one will have a hardboard base with the shiny side up for the saw to ride on.
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"RayV" wrote:

Yep.
Lew
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In honor of my Scottish ancestors, a parsimonious lot who kept the Lord's Sabbath and everything else they could get their hands on, I've always enjoyed the following.
A Highland Guard Regimental Sargent Major (RSM) stopped into an apothecary (drugstore) one day, resplendent in his regimental kilt.
"May I help you?" asks the druggist. "Oh, aye" says the RSM shyly as he reaches in to his Sporran (which as you all know is like a small purse).
He takes out a folded handkerchief, places it on the counter and extracts a used prophylactic from its folds.
"It's sprung a wee leak" says the RSM. "Kin ya repairrr it?"
"Yes" says the shopkeeper "But it will cost you tuppence and I can sell you anew one for three pence!"
Put off at this news the RSM slowly folds the proph back into the handkerchief and places it back in his Sporran.
"I'll be back" he says, as he marches out the door.
The next day the RSM is waiting at the front door when the druggist opens shop and enters the store and once again places his proph on the counter.
"Have you come to a decision?" asks the druggist.
"Oh aye" says the RSM, "The Rrrrrrrregiment has voted to repairrrrr it! ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ ++
Lew
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If you are really worried about it, use the Skil saw with plywood guides snug against both sides of the sole late and over another piece of plywood. Lighty tack the piece to the bottom board with thin brads to prevent slipping. Details are your to figure out in your own particular case, good luck, I know you can do it.
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Adam wrote:

The Router and a straightedge will actually cut plywood nicely. Many CNC machines use a router to cut out the parts.
What kind of wood are you cutting?
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: I have considered buying a circular saw ($50 Skil) that has an : Accu-Sight. Along with that I will setup a fence. Do you think that is a : good plan / option? Any other tips that you guys have for me? This is my : first wood working project and I am anxious to get started with it!
My first project was done with a Skil circular saw (no accu-sight), a hand held router, and a shop-mate work table. If you don't need to work on any long pieces (over 4'), and you are careful, you'll do fine.
I'd recommend clamping pieces of wood or MDF to act as guides for every cut. Think about how to guide the cut, clamp guides in place, make a test cut on scrapwood, measure and adjust, and then make your final cut. If necessary, buy extra wood for test cuts, guides, stop blocks, backer-boards, etc.
I spent much longer planning the cut than I did making the final cut, but I ended up with invisible tight joints using hand held tools.
Even when you get a table saw, you'll still find the circular saw useful.
When I replaced my Skil saw, I got a big beefy DeWalt. I find it's a little too heavy for me. I use it, but I wish I'd gotten something a little lighter. I don't think the accu-sight will be accurate enough in this case. You'll need a guide. The accu-sight may help when cutting free-hand.
Have fun!
--- Chip
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Chip and everyone else,
Thanks for the responses. I wasn't sure if I was doing something wrong before, but I used a long straight edge and got a wonderful cut out of it!
Now to figure out how to get 1" off of a 5 1/2" piece of wood! (May be a little harder doing it with a circular saw than a table saw, but I think I'll manage :)
Adam
Chip Buchholtz wrote:

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