Powermatic 66 Blade Change Problem

Trying to remove a plywood blade, and when I lodge a piece of hard maple against it, it is not enough to prevent blade from turning and nut on arbor will not move. I am trying to move it counterclockwise. Anyone have any tricks? Help!
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On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 10:15:15 -0500, "Tom Holman"

Try another piece of wood. I've tried a clamp and found the jammed wood works better. I like using a soft wood as it bites into the teeth better. Put a couple drops of Liquid Wrench on the threads and (lightly) tap the wrench with a piece of wood.
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Thanks for the tip to use Liquid Wrench. It did the trick! However, I had to sacrifice a very inexpensive Oldham Plywood saw blade -- that was a small price I gladly paid. If I had overtightened the arbor nut, then it is very difficult to gauge how tight is too tight and how loose renders the operation of the saw unsafe. It took enormnous force even after the Liquid Wrench was applied to move the nut very slightly before it would turn easily. Given the slight turn that was required I doubt that the nut was overtightened to begin with.
Thanks to all who attempted to answer my question, and I appreciate all the suggestions that were made.
wrote:

arbor
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Glad to help. You may want to clean off the arbor and arbor nut threads with kerosene and a small brass brush which will help clean off rust and keep rust away.
On Mon, 13 Dec 2004 20:49:24 -0500, "Tom Holman"

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On Sun, 12 Dec 2004 10:15:15 -0500, "Tom Holman"

I can't believe that a PM66 dosen't have arbor flats for a second wrench. If it really dosen't, lose the wood and try one of the following to hold the blade:
A heavy work glove A quick clamp with plastic pads A commercial blade gripper like the Bench Dog BladeLoc
Barry
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Tom Holman wrote:

Had that problem with the factory blade on my shiny new Crapsman TS. I bought one of those Blade-Loc flummies from LV, and all it did was get turned to orange shreds. I tried wood (various woods, various sizes) under a tooth. I could eventually wrench hard enough to saw through the wood, or break it.
What finally worked was a steel rod hooked in one of the gullets and spanning the throat. I think it was 1/4" rod, and I bent the hell out of it before I finally got the blade loose.
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Not that I'm an expert by any stretch, but it sounds as if you are seriously over tightening your arbor nut. For an alternate opinion check out the Q&A section of the Winter 2004/2005 FWW (no affiliation with them, just happen to see the article this week). It suggests hand holding the blade to tighten and loosen the blade by whacking the wrench with a small stick. This would mean the nut is much looser than yours is now. I'm sure there are other opinions out there.
Tom Holman wrote:

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PB Buster..... .can get it an auto store.
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One method of holding the blade while truning the arbor nut is to clamp the blade with vise grips (as a caliper grabs a rotor on a car). The vise grips will not pass thru the throat plate opening and will prevent the blade from spinning while you apply pressure to the nut with a wrench. It will also free up your other hand.

arbor
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"TEF" wrote in message ...

Tom,
I thought about that solution, but wonder if clamping the blade may cause other problems, such as bending the blade, affecting tensioning or cracking/weakening a weld on a tooth.
I also thought of sandwiching the blade between two pieces of wood, then clamping - but once again, I am not comfortable with the idea. Any experts on blades out there care to comment?
--
Greg (who thankfully has an arbour nut that comes loose easily)



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Generally the jaws of a vise grip are curved so that the actual clamping point would be well inboard of the teeth (especially a plywood blade's small teeth). Alternatively, your idea of using wooden pads would also mitigate damage to the blade's teeth. This method doesn't seem any more damaging to a blade that ramming wood into the blades to stop it turning.
Just curious, but does a plywood blade have separate welded teeth or is it just a one-piece stamped steel disk with teeth cut into it?

also
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I use those plastic Quick Clamps such as Irwin's with the big rubber pads. They can be used one handed. You clamp the blade and let the clamp rest on the saw table. max

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I believe a better approach is a sharp whack on the wrench with a suitable board will almost certainly break the nut loose. Remember, you ain't playing baseball, just trying to break loose the nut.
Tom Holman wrote:

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