powered grinding (not sharpening(?))

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wrote:

I think you could buy a whole second set of chisels and have both angles all the time for less. I have two 1/4" chisels that I use most often and have one at 25 and one at 30.
Mostly though I just let one get dull ;)
-Leuf
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Every shop needs a good bench grinder. Toss the junk wheels that come with the cheap chineese import and get two wheels a fine and a medium.
Now get yourself a wheel dresser.
The machine comes with a tool rest, and you can make a bevel guice from wood.
With the bench grinder you are knocking down the bulk of the work, not creating the edge. After you get close on the face of the wheel you can cheat a little and side wheel some of the kollow grind out of the blade.
The closer you get to a sharp edge, the quicker the edge will heat up. Since you know this, you give the blade less time and pressure as you get closer. Dip in water often. It is really not that tough to do. If you are worried about it buy some cold rolled steel in the approxamate size of your chisels and practice with that.
In the US, you can set yourself up the way I described for about $160, cheaper if you can buy a used machine. Don't skinp on the wheels.
Let me point out that in every machine shop the machinists quickly learn to sharpen their drill bits by hand on bench grinders, and that tool steel is not much different than your chisel.
Once you are almost there consider the diamond wetstones that are out there. They are now cheaper than ever and they do not tend to get concave like regular stones. They will quickly take the blade to the correct geometry for the final keen edge to be given so you can go back to shaping the wood.
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
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Used to be. Now, about 1 in 25 can do this. Forget about a lathe tool, they wouldn't know where to begin.
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That's a little pessimistic, CW. Most of the guys I know can do it, even when there is a sharpening rig right at hand that makes it a somewhat less important skill.
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OK, 1 in 24. The shop that I work in now, ther is one other besides me that can grind a tool by hand. The last shop, I was the only one. I have worked in 100 man shops around here and you could count on one hand the number of people that could grind there own tools.
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So twist drills have various tip angles for various materials; Wood, non-ferrous metals, hardened steel, whatever. Someone worked out that the angles (118 degrees, for example) were the "best" in some sense. Efficiency of drilling, drill life, clean cut, I dunno.
My question is, just for grins, would you sharpen a bunch of drills for us and measure the variance in grinding angle among them? I'm guessing you'd get a bell curve around the optimum. Have one of your workmates who "can't" do it by hand do a bunch and then measure the variance of his batch. Ugh, sloppy, right? But, how close would a reasonably competent machine-shop dude come to "good-enough"?
--
"Keep your ass behind you."

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Prometheus wrote:

bits to sharpen. My instructions were to come get the boss when I felt confident about that part. 3-4 hours later he handed me a bushel or so of mixed nuts and machine screws to sort.
Ahhh ... those were the days! ;-)
Bill
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Do you know how durable diamond stones are generally? I had a very concave 50+ yr. old sharpening stone from my Dad, out of sentiment more than need I went to great lengths to flattened it.....In the process I seem to have removed the diamond particles from a coarse diamond stone....I also did a number on a 10inch sanding disk and 4inch sanding belt etc.....Obviously the old stone now probably 1/2 original (when new) thickness "wins" on durable except for the former concave part...Dad mostly used it for decades to do his pocket knife..........Also is there any way to determine if a "old" stone is a water stone or a oil stone? He generally used oil. Or what grit a old stone might be? Rod
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On Sat, 17 Feb 2007 18:54:19 -0800, "Rod & Betty Jo"

Are you sure that you "removed the diamond particles"? Diamond stones go through a "wearing in" process.

If it's an old stone and not from Japan or that vicinity then it's almost certainly an oilstone, might be an Arkansas stone or a Carborundum synthetic. Arkansas doesn't have a "grit" per se, it comes Washita, soft, hard, surgical hard in order of fineness. Can't really tell Washita, soft, or hard from looking at them, surgical hard will usually be black or translucent.
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