Power tools: What to buy?

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Woodwork has always been my Hobby in readings and in daydreams. Now that I am retiring, I hope to make a hands-on. I bought myself a Titan 2000, a 9" circular saw by Hitachi, and now I would like to get some other power tools and hope for advise here. I intend to do both not-so-fine jobs like fences, and finer jobs like cupboards tables and chairs (if I am capable)
Limiting resources to $2-3000 for power tools, what and which power tools (brand and models) should I aquire?
Jigsaw...... Bosch 1590EVSK ? Sander Drill Router
Thanks in advance
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chinkc wrote:

I don't think you can do better. I have that one and absolutely love it.

You need more than one for different jobs. Dewalt makes a nice belt sander (DW433... $179) 3"X21" is probably the most useful size. A 6" random orbital sander is also an excellent purchase. I bought the Ridgid R2610 ($139) on the advice of one of the woodworking reviews as a best buy and like it as well. I also own a finishing sander (Makita) and a detail sander.

Start out with one of the best and then you won't need to upgrade later. The only time you enjoy a cheap tool is the day you pay for it. I suggest the Milwaukee 18V hammer drill (0624-24... $249). Dewalt and Bosch make some fine ones too.

Porter Cable. Beyond that, it depends on your intended use. I own a big 3.25 HP router that is mounted in a table and a smaller one for use as a hand held. I use them both and have no regrets. Don't screw around with 1/4" bits; get the 1/2" ones from the gitgo.
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wrote:

Yeah, don't buy power tools.
I don't know what particular "woodworking" you're thinking of. The stuff I make is generally furniture that's some sort of box I can pick up and place on my bench, not housebuilding or installed trim. I already have most of the hand-held power tools I could ever want, and a few of the fixed machines too. The ones I _use_ most are the fixed machines, and they're also the ones where I find myself wishing I had a better or bigger version of the same tool.
I use a cordless drill a fair bit, but they're so cheap it's crazy not to have one. I used to use a router a lot, but much less so since I got a decent sawbench. The others - well, I have them, but I really don't give them a fraction of the use my bandsaw or jointer get.
The two powered tools I couldn't work without are a decent workbench and a decent cabinet saw. Most of the other things I use are hand tools, and you don't even need that many of those.
For on-site work, or installing house trim, then I use power tools rather more. Not for benchwork though. Buy what you need, when you need it. Don't think you need to rush out and drop a few thousand, all in one go. Buy some timber, finishing supplies, a few books, some really good lighting for the workshop.
For metalworking I use a MIG (wire feed) welder, an angle grinder in each hand and a spare angle grinder in case I wear one out. There I do use more hand-held power tools.
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Smert' spamionam

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I agree with Andy - the most used tool in most WW shops is a good table saw. I would invest half (or more) of your budget there. It was the first thing I bought 15+ years ago and always wish that I had invested more $ then. Now I am looking to upgrade to what I should have bought.
Lou

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Absolutely. A good table saw is critical, and make sure it has an excellent fence. You could break your budget on that item alone....
Dave

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And use the blade that come with it for when you have to hack up some 2 x 4s. Get a good blade for any good projects. Ridge Carbide www.ridgecarbidetool.com or Forrest, and maybe a couple of other good ones should be considered.
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chinkc woke up and had the following words of wisdom ....:

I started out the same way. Here are my acquisitions in the order that I acquired them:
1. 10" Table saw that was my fathers/grandfathers. Cost including reconditioning and a REAL good 10" blade. = $200.00
2. Hitachi 12MV Plunger Router. Cost = $199.00.
3. Jet 6" Jointer. Cost $499.00
4. Router table (New Yankee Workshop version). Cost = $250.00
5. Delta Floor model Drill Press. Cost $299.00
6. Misc tools ($150). Router bits ($250.00), Clamps ($150.00), Calipers, measuring rules ($75.00).
I am just over $2000, but I have enough tools to do cabinets, and other wood furniture. Just remember to include some of the other items (bits, blades, clamps, etc) into the total cost of the tools. Nothing like buying $2000 worth of power tools and not have any more money left for the rest of the items.
JAW
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I have always bought the tools needed to do the project. Most of time I justify the tool by all the money I save by doing it myself. After a while you own every thing. A few more years and you own big medium and small everything. A few more years and you own 3 or 4 of everything. So you don't have to change bits/blades constantly. Or because you can't find it when you need it. Sometimes you buy it because of a great deal. Sometimes its because yours is a year or so old and the new ones come with some great new features. No one buys the great (expensive) tools in the beginning. They always start off with the cheap ones and struggle and cuss before throwing the junk out and buying good stuff. Don't worry much about budgets. I don't like to think about how much I've spent over the years.
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I resemble that remark...
Lou
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When I cannot find tool X1 in my "collection", it must be time to purchase tool X2 (which is newer, of course) in order to search for tool X1. Maybe homing devices are built into each one or when X2 shows up, X1 can quit playing hide-and-seek. Either that day or the next, X1 invariably appears and I then recall why I left it where it was found.
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My table saw (a PM 66) is probably the most used power tool in my shop. I would second the jointer (DJ 8) and drill press.
wrote:

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wrote:

Hard to beat that

One good ROS, PC or Bosch, and then some cheapies for other uses, as required

Cheap works for me, I have about 5, almost easier to buy a new one than change bits ! A low-mid quality drill press (Ryobi) gets a lot of use.

I started with a cheapie, then bought the Triton, it's fantastic, but the cheapie still gets used. But, don't overlook the cost of router bits, they can add up.
I have to disagree with most other posters, I had a table saw, as well as an 18" BS. Hardly used the TS, so got rid of it, Have hardly missed it, as the BS gets used so much more and can do things no TS can. The odd time I need something resembling a TS, I can easily make do with a circular saw and sawhorses.
Others opinions will differ, but that's how I find it.
Barry Lennox
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I suggest you take a woodworking course to find out what the various tools do and what sort of projects you might be doing.
Any specific advice you get in response to your vague question is likely to be inappropriate. (Though I did like the fellow who said he got rid of his tablesaw and hasn't missed it, or the one that said your router should be Porter-Cable; probably true for those individuals, but as blanket statements???)
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He didn't get rid of it, he replaced it with a bandsaw.
Now I can't see myself doing that, and I'd want a bigger and better bandsaw before I even tried to, but I can see the logic in it.
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I'm planning to go the bandsaw instead of tablesaw route myself. I don't have either right now (still a newbie) but my plans are to get a bandsaw as my next major purchase. It's smaller, safer, and there's not much a bandsaw plus router can't do that a tablesaw can. Sheet goods are the main thing that would be challenge (or some cuts impossible) on the bandsaw, but I'll build a foldaway table and a straightedge for my circular saw. You'd need a similar sized outfeed table for the tablesaw anyway.
-Greg Vaughn
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I am not going to argue with you . BUT you better buy a darn good Bandsaw
I guess it really boils down to what you are planning on making... But if you plan on tables, desks, etc...There is absolutely no way I would be without my Tablesaw....
Honestly getting a straight cut using a Bandsaw is a lot more time consuming and much more dificult then using a Tablesaw..
On the saftey issue you bring up...with 40+ years in the shop I do not think of the bandsaw as being any safer to use then a Tablesaw I do not ever flip the switch and start the blade moving before I put my brain in gear no mater if I am using a hand saw or a power tool...
Sheet goods ... lol... They are a challenge even using a Cabinet Saw with a large outfeed table ... I haul out the straight edge and use a circular saw almost all the time to rough cut a 4x8 sheet of plywood etc down to a reasonable size...
Bob Griffiths
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buy one.. But since you admit you don't know what you are talking about, why are you sharing your opinion with us? Based on your years of experience, it really doesn't mean anything, does it?
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: Greg first wrote:

And now he says:

Re-read the first post. Does that sound like a question or does it sound like a statement from someone that has made up his mind. My interpretation is that the person made a statement about a decision and based the decision on certain facts about the bandsaw safety and its capabilities.
If you want an opinion, this is the place to get one. Here's mine:
Bandsaws are great tools. Every shop should have one. IMO, they should also have a tablesaw and if you can only have one at a time, go with the tablesaw first.
If you go back in history, handsaws and planes were used for ripping wood and joining pieces together to form wider pieces. It works and can be done to perfection. If you enjoy doing that, by all means, go ahead and have fun; hand work is very satisfying. OTOH, if you want to rip a board to exact size, have it smooth for joining, a good blade on a tablesaw will save a lot of time.
I'm sure you'll find people that have just a bandsaw, or just a RAS, or only hand tools. They do good work and enjoy it. That, however, does not prove wrong the 98% or more that have a tablesaw.
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wrote:

yes. note that bandsaws will remove fingers just as well as table saws.

no. bandsaws have very limited rip widths.

that thread is years old. google is your friend: <http://groups.google.com/advanced_group_search?dq=&num%&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&group=rec.woodworking

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To some extent it may be safer as far as kickback. Couple of weeks ago I had the bandsaw grab a piece of wood I was cutting. It bent the blade, bent the insert and scared the crap out of me more than the tablsaw ever did. My tablesaw has a guard in place most of the time and I use push sticks etc. The bandsaw can have 6" of blade exposed and I'm moving the work around with my hands. If it can resaw a piece of 6" oak, it can lop off a finger.

Theory, yes. Take a simple dado. It may take two or three passes with a router versus one over a dado blade in the saw. How about a dado or rabbet on an angle?

Most of us have some combination. No one tool is bets for everything.

I don't own a jointer yet. IMO, the planer is more useful if you only have one tool, but other will say the opposite. I can easily buy jointed wood, or use a shimmed sled on the planer easier than I can get wood thicknessed on the spot when I need it. Ed
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