Power plane rough sawn beam?


Hi, We had 6x8" rough sawn beams installed as collar ties of a cathedral ceiling room. The beams look too hefty, so we are debating having them replaced again with 4x8 beams, with resulting cost and aggravation for our contractors who lifted the 6x8's in place... I am wondering if it would be reasonably possible (say over a weekend for one person) to use a 3-4" hand power plane to "thin down" the beams that are in place now (by 1.5-2"). There are four beams in total, 14' in length. Any opinions are appreciated. Regards, Wolfgang in VT
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ceiling
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Not for that much, best to rent the makita 16" timber circular saw, most rental places have this.
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Thanks for all the replies.
The 16" circular saw sounds very scary, using it 8' above the floor on scaffolding? Battleax, do you have personal experience with this?
The Alaskan Mill for chainsaws seems less intimidating, but I have never used either type of saw. Regards, Wolfgang

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Now that I realize it's in-place the circular saw would be difficult because you'd be coming in from both sides, you don't want to use the 16" upsidedown, I can't imagine it.
Regardless you still have to deal with the ends that the saw won't reach. I'd say unless the beams are on the ground this is a very difficult project, and I work with post&beam every day.

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I can visualize the entire room being filled with shavings from such a project. I think you'd have a huge mess and crappy beam when all is done.
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I just used a power plane to carve a new daggerboard out of a block of oak. It took a while and was hard work. Your chore is about 100 times as much work and (apparently) overhead. It can't be a good idea.
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Not reasonable at all IMO. It would take too long and leave a smooth surface. Depending on how rough sawn the surface is you may be able to use a chainsaw with guide like one of these http://www.loghelp.com/tools/chainsaw.html
Art

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wrote:

2:1 proportion is going to look pretty odd too. If you can't change the 8" dimension, then I'd leave them be.
If at all possible, then I'd lift them down and work at ground level. if I had to work at height, then I'd want _good_ staging in place to work on. I'd trim them down by hand sawing a notch out at each end to give saw-space, then running a large circular saw along them. With a big framer's saw you can rip both sides and almost through, then take the central web out by hand (or by splitting it).
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I have read about beams in old buildings that have been hewn thinner while in place, but taking a broad axe to your ceiling beams is something that needs practice before and a good cure of muscle cramps afterward.
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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