Powdered Pumice, rottenstone & Plumber's Rouge?

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"Larry Jaques" wrote:

-------------------------------- DE is super fine and yes it will kill you.
Lew
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On Wed, 9 Mar 2011 17:45:51 -0800, "Lew Hodgett"

The type we used to use in our pool filter was the fine stuff, and I've seen the coarser granules of garden DE, which aren't as deadly. Garden DE is used on carpets to kill fleas. I hear it dices up their bods and dessicates them nicely.
-- Life is full of obstacle illusions. -- Grant Frazier
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"Larry Jaques" wrote:

One of my customers located between Los Angeles and Santa Barbara mines the stuff here in SoCal, which is one of the few places DE exists in the USA.
Lew
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On 3/10/2011 12:53 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Here is a condensed version of my own cursory research...
Diatomaceous earth is mined, milled, and processed into a myriad of types for a large variety of uses. Filtering and filler are two main uses but diatomaceous earth also ends up in paints, cosmetics, drugs, chemical insecticides, etc. Because the milling produces different sized and shaped particles, it is important not to use the filtering type for agricultural purposes.
Pool filter grade diatomaceous earth has been heat and chemically treated and will poison an animal or human who ingests it, so it is always of utmost importance to only obtain food grade diatomaceous earth to use in and around your household.
Diatoms (DE) are the grass of the oceans and lakes. Just as grass is the staple food of earth animals. Diatoms (algae) are the food of the ocean or fresh water grazers. Magnified 7000x, diatomaceous earth looks like spiney honeycombs.
Food grade diatomaceous earth is EPA approved to be mixed with grains to control mealworms and other pests and has been exempted from tolerance requirements as an inert, inactive ingredient in chemical pesticides. Diatomaceous earth is EPA approved against indoor and outdoor crawling insects. Diatomaceous earth is USDA approved as an anti-caking agent for animal feed. Diatomaceous earth is FDA approved for internal and external use and has a rating of Food Chemical Codex Grade.
OMRI listed Codex Food Chemical Grade is organic. It is a non-treated, non-calcined fresh water Diatomaceous Earth. It is mined, crushed, sifted, bagged and pure white in color. It contains less than .5% silicon. There are food grade diatomaceous earth products that are yellow or tan in color which indicates a higher iron content. Those which are gray in color contain more clay.
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wrote:

It's safe enough that it can be fed to animals as a vermicide.
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A couple of spit coats of 2 lb shellac, followed by a quick rubbing with an alcohol-dampened muneca dipped in FFFF is standard technique. Rub too long, and you'll pull any dried shellac/pumice slurry from the pores, making work and pissing yourself off in the process.
Repeat as needed if you're not sufficiently pissed off.
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On 3/9/2011 2:49 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

So far, haven't gotten my hands on any pumice ...still lookin'. Jist fer funsies, thought I'd waste a couple hours tomorrow experimenting and see what happens with diatomacious earth (DE) as a substitute. Prospects aren't good, but, curiosity et al...
Thanks,
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Interested in seeing your results. Shellac and pumice is the fastest and best grain filler I've used (as well as the cheapest, with Pore-O-Pac selling for $25 / pint). If there's anything cheaper and faster, I'd like to know.
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On 3/10/2011 10:02 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

Temperatures here have fallen drastically this afternoon, slightly above freezing overnight. Sigh ...may be delayed for another day or so, but will let you know. Also interested in playing with paraffin oil and see what I can learn from that process as well.
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Might try a drugstore for pumice. Some folks use it for dental care. I, too, still have a box of pumice powder in the shop but I haven't used it in years. Last use I can remember was buffing the finish on an old rocking chair I refinished and it did a good job. No machines -- just a hand pad of wadded rags and a few drops of water after the varnish has set a few days.
I have used rouge on some metal and gem stone polishing projects and used the Dremel with polishing pad. I believe you can get jeweler's rouge, in small amounts, from Dremel. Otherwise try a hardware or jewelry store. I would start with Ace, because they are the PLACE. At least in rural SE Kansas, they are pretty well stocked.
RonB
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On 12/31/1969 7:00 PM, wrote:

I can find pumice stone, but not the 4F (FFFF - ultra fine) powdered pumice I am looking for. Didn't think of a drugstore as possible source so will look around this evening.

Jeweler's rouge does indeed come in very small quantities and not exactly cheap either; Tripoli, for example, can run as high as $30.00 a stick + shipping.
After talking with the local auto-body repair shop this morning, I believe an automotive style compound may offer considerable advantage in a wet look finish. At least worth investigation.
Local ACE store here is privately owned and not very well stocked. Also not doing as well as the True Value on opposite corner. Neither store offers very much support to woodworking community. However, if you want an accessory for a $6,000 riding mower or $400.00 leaf blower, well now, that is a horse they are both familiar with.<g>
Thanks Ron, for the ideas and additional input...

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Toothpaste or baking soda would be candidates.
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On 3/9/2011 2:58 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

Completely forgot about baking soda, been way too many years passed. Really rusty so I find these reminders extremely helpful.
Thanks again,
BTW, no chance you live nearby in North Central Fl? You're certainly welcome to come over and help me recover all that knowledge lost.<g>
Now let's see, where did I store that thing with the long thin blade that goes around in circles? ...oh yeah, I remember now, it was called a bandsaw.
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