Possible to make Delta benchtop 10 inch saw accurate?

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Is it possible to get this saw as accurate as a real table saw? I have some furnature projects and this is the only saw I have and cant afford another one right now. I odnt have a jointer either.
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Short answer: No.
Long answer: That depends.
For my first project, I tolerated a delta bench top table saw. For my second project, I built a large table that surrounded the saw so I could safely cut plywood. Then I threw out my fence and cooked something up that was more sturdy and accurate.
For the third project, I bought a real table saw.
Norm has an episode of NYW that talks about these saws and shows how to make an extra fence from some mdf and a pipe clamp. It's probably better than not having a table saw, but that should be the first tool you replace.
brian
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I have a *real* Jet contractors saw that some would say is junk compared to a Unisaw. but I spent time adjusting/tuning it and it cut OK. I noticed a huge improvement when I bought a decent blade. As long as the arbor is not bent you should be able to get that saw to do quite a bit with a good quality blade. And if you ever *upgrade* to a real saw you can take the blade with you.
http://www.newyankee.com/getproduct3.cgi?9908
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RayV wrote:

As someone who as owned a good contractors saw and a good cabinet saw, I can say that anyone who says that saw is junk is a moron. <G>
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Is it within the realm of remote possibilities? Sure, you could do it if you wanted to take a long time setting up cuts, measuring a million times, etc. Are you going to enjoy doing it? No. Are you going to end up with a lot of bad cuts that you have to do over again? Absolutely. Are you going to wish you had a decent saw to begin with? Hell yes.
If that's all you have, you're going to have to make due, but it's not going to be as fast or as much fun as having a decent saw in the long run.
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I think what happens a lot is we start out with one of these saws and pre-surfaced lumber from the home center. The lumber used to have a nice jointed edge on it, but by the time it's gotten to you it isn't anymore. And so we blame the problem on the saw. If the edge that is following the fence is not straight the cut is not going to be good, period.
Now that said, you may have to resort to things like double checking that the fence has locked down square every single time you move it. You may have to put a clamp on the back end to keep it from deflecting during the cut. You may have to attach an auxillary fence to it because it wasn't straight to begin with. You may not be able to do all the things that other people do on their bigger saws, but you can do rip cuts, and cross cuts as long as the board isn't very wide.
-Leuf
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Are you talking about ripping or crosscutting? Crosscutting is all but impossible. You can rip as accurately as on any tablesaw; the problem is that the fence won't be parallel to the blade unless you spend 20 minutes setting it up. You can get a perfectly good used contractors saw for $200. Unless you have nothing better to do, it pays for itself real quick. Then build a sled and crosscutting becomes accurate also.
You can live without a jointer, but not a decent saw.
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You're absolutely right.
I have a friend who bought a really crappy benchtop saw a while back, the thing isn't remotely accurate at all. The arbor has awful runout, the fence not only does not lock parallel to the blade, it *CAN'T*. As soon as you flip down the lever, the back of the fence shifts 1/16" of an into towards the blade. The miter slots are non-standard, you can't just go out and buy a new miter gauge and the one that came with it slips. I ended up building him a good crosscut sled that would work with his slots so he can at least do some semi-accurate crosscuts, but he still can't rip on it worth anything.
He's saving for a new saw and this one is going straight into the trash.
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Look at it another way.......... Use your skills (or develop them) and it should be fine. It was not so long ago that carpenters and furniture makers completed their work with but a few hand tools. Imagine how much easier their work would have been to have your table saw.
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Joe wrote:

To all and sundry: I believe that leaving that "EX-Nay-arkiv:yo" in your response will also keep it out of the google archives.
er
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No. It has to be either in the headers or the first line of the body.
djb
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Dave Balderstone wrote:

Thanks,
er
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wrote:

And while they only used hand tools they did spend a very long time learning that skill and they had long hours every day to learn that skill.
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The voice of reason. Well put, Joe. Would I rather have a bench top saw rather than the contractor's that I have now? No. Would I feel disabled if I had to use a benchtop saw? Again, no. I have used a few of them with good results. Hell, my grandfather used a piece of plywood with a motor hanging under it spinning a steel saw blade. I've got some of his stuff in my house to this day.
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I have never used a real saw but I do use a Delta 10" benchtop. It does an adaquate job for me. I have built some fairly major projects with it that fit fine. To see some of the projects I have used it for see: http://webpages.charter.net/ray93402/Woodwork/woodwork.html
I can never remember having to recut a peice ruined by the saw. It does not produce edges good enough for glue up, but a straight edge and router cleans it up fine. A sled makes crosscuts easy and accurate.
A poor craftsman often blames his tools.
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That is reassuring to know. What is your procedure for getting edges straight enough for glue ups? Can I use a router table somehow? (I am new to woodworking) Who wrote:

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stryped wrote:

You mean use the router table as a jointer? Sure, that's possible and easy...check the archives for the answers to your question about how to do exactly that.
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All he really needs to do is check his memory. He asked this just a short time ago and was given advice at length.

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I tried using the router table as a jointer without much success. I have an aluminum extrusion that comes as 2 4 foot lengths that can be joined that has clamps that slide along the bottom. These are readily available in places like Lowes or Home Depot. I paid $15 for a set years ago. A long level will also work. Most of the times the boards are less than 4 feet so just one section is used.
I clamp this to the board such that the router will shave about 1/32" of wood off the board. Make two passes to make sure you don't miss a spot. If there are still low spots reposition the strait edge and repeat. I use a 1/2" router bit. The saw can get the edge within a 32nd so one pass usually is sufficient

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This may seem dumb, but how do you determine where to put the straight edge so you take off the right amoutn and get it straight? (I have not used a router only in my table. Who wrote:

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