Possible Condensation Solution?

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I agree it won't get hot enough to be a worry, but if the bulb were to break (see the recent exploding bulb thread), whilst you were running the saw, it might be possible to cause a fire. Obviously you would just turn the bulb off while using the equipment, but "doodoo occurs".
-- Bill Pounds http://www.bill.pounds.net/woodshop
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reasonable. paper ignites at 451 F. <grin>

Not sure how/where you come up with that number, but it doesn't seem unreasonable.
Something opaque, and particularly if it's a darker color than the frosted glass, will likely get considerably hotter.
Enough to ignite? "I dunno". not a risk I'd care to take.
Now, just sticking something like a trouble-light in, when the saw is in 'cold storage' -- that eliminates all the vibration and/or crud-collecting problems.

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snipped-for-privacy@horatio.agresource.com () writes:
[...]

... and if the bulb is covered with sawdust it's thermally insulated from the outside, so it will get considerably hotter, especially as the sawdust absobrs the light and infrared radiation, so ignition temperature can be definitly reached. Old tube-equpped TV sets caught fire usually because all the heat-generating parts inside were covered in dust, run hotter and got the dust to burn....
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Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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I have the same problem.
My shop is the 3rd stall of the garage. (there are 2 doors - 1 double for the main garage - and 1 single for my shop.)
Last night was so humid and this morning - it got up to about 65 pretty quickly. I came out to the shop about 9:30 and my table saw and jointer was literally dripping condensation.
I wiped it off only to show a nice coating of rust already. Im thinking of just trying a cover - but I do like that heating pad. What would be better is if I can find a temperature switch that would automatically turn it on/off when it reaches about 55 or so.

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Because of the objections to the light bulb idea, for reasons of possible breakage, I started thinking about those little heat mats that are used for seedlings. You can get them with thermostats.
Maybe if one of these was fastened to the underside of the cast iron top it would work. It would be out of the inside of the cabinet, where it might be damaged. The thing could be left plugged in and allowed to run off the thermostat.
Regards, Tom Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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I had a similar problem with the tools in my Snapon box rusting in the shop. That little seedling mat in the bottom drawer cured the problem and when the temperature is warm enough, it never comes on. I have been thinking about adding a small solar panel for some cathodic protection too...
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"Tom Watson" < snipped-for-privacy@CLUETOKEN.snip.net> wrote in message
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On Wed, 05 Nov 2003 20:16:09 GMT, Tom Watson

Seven watt (night light) is all you need to chase away moisture. A reptile heating stone from a pet shop will work too if you don't want the light. A 60 watt bulb might be hazardous.
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This maybe a bit extreme, but I have a couple of magnetic block heaters laying around. Stick one on the table of the jointer, one on the table saw. Easily removed when the time to make wood chips arrives. Greg
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Just a thought from (usually) a lurker. The heat wrap tape that you put around water pipes to keep them from freezing might work well. Fasten it up under the table surface, wings, whatever else and plug it in when needed. James
Greg O wrote:

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"Wandering prevents one from becoming Dull and Stupid"


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On Wed, 05 Nov 2003 20:16:09 GMT, Tom Watson

I use a polythene sheet, with small magnets gaffer-taped on top of it to hold it down. Most of my trouble is with condensation on the uninsulated clear roof, which then drips down.
If you place a plastic sheet over the saw, then you trap whatever moisture is underneath and this will condense out overnight _if_ the dew point is reached. In my workshop, I don't have this trouble - it doesn't get that cold at night, except at roof level. I'd suggest some experimentation before ruling out the plastic sheet approach entirely.
For the truly obsessive and slightly geeky, Dallas iButtons are an excellent and cheap way of logging temperatures overnight. Well worth looking at. Condensation _is_ predictable, if you have knowledge of temperature over night and the initial humidity.
My hand tools now live in a heated steel cupboard. This is just a cupboard, with the anti-condensation heater from an old photocopier mounted in the base. This is 25W, in something the size of a small eardrobe, and is currently giving me about 10C of extra temperature. (15C vs 5C in the workshop).
I'd be a little wary of heating machines. Damp green sawdust and a source of heat might start to ferment and start its own fire. OTOH, my saw has DC by pile and shovel - maybe yours has efficient vacuum.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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