Porter Cable router bits

Are they any good?
Is this a good deal? http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page0012&utm_source=NL&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=V1928
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That is a great deal. Too bad they're not 1/2" shank instead of 1/4" especially for the 1/2 cove bit. RP
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http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page0012&utm_source=NL&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=V1928
Bit Set you do not have much to loose at $14.99 for three pieces set. I have used the Porter Cable bits and so far they have performed well. If you have a need for it, the Freud Quadra-Cut Classical Cove & Round Bits at $19.99 each, in my view is a better buy. I have used Freud router bits with good results.
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wondered about the quality. I am apprehensive about the shank size, but for that price, as long as they are quality bits, I'll take a chance.
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The 1/2" shank size is far better. Freud claimed that they are using a dropped forged casting instead of a machined mandrel to house the carbide inserts.
Carbide is made with power metal and baked to specific procedures. The quality is difficult to verify before using it. When working on 24 hours shift mast production we learned who had the best carbide. Replacing a carbide insert on a production line is expensive. We soon found out that it was worth it to paid a little more. But for the hobbyists regular carbide grade may be good enough. Porter Cable claimed that their sub fabricator in China is using grade C 4?
As for me when I make raised panel doors I like a better carbide grade and mandrel.
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Having a friend that is a Carbide expert - owns company - he sent me a couple of booklets. Copy these down for future reference:
C grades classification (not all companies make the same chem mix.) C1-4 are general for cast iron, non-ferrous and non-metallic materials C-1 Roughing C-2 General Purpose typical wood C-3 Finishing C-4 Precision
5-7 steel and steel alloys - resist pitting
C-5 Roughing C-6 General purpose C-7 Finishing C-8 Precision
Wear surface: C-9 No shock C-10 Light Shock C-11 Heavy Shock
Impact C-12 Light C-13 Medium C-14 heavy
C15-c19 Misc - mostly very special...
Martin
On 1/1/2011 9:26 AM, Denis M wrote:

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Thanks for the information.
When asking Tools King they quickly replied
that Porter Cable sub-fabricators in China was using C4.
Lee Valley replied that their router bits were made in China and the grading was made
as per their specifications? Lee Valley was unable to provide further information.
I purchased a Lee Valley Shaker raised panel bit and it performs well, so far.
On sale ($9.95) at Tools King I bought a Porter Cable 1" core bit with a 1/4" shank.
At first I was very doubtful about the 1/4" shank. I used it with pine, maple and oak and
It performs well. The question is for how long will this bit keep its precision and last.
Sharpening of carbide bits could be tricky and costly. At time it could be cheaper to replace the bit with a new one.

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On Sun, 02 Jan 2011 06:24:42 -0400, Denis M wrote:

Every time I use a bit I give it a few swipes with a diamond hone before I put it away. Seems to extend lifespan quite a bit but of course that's a subjective judgment.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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On Sun, 2 Jan 2011 15:59:28 -0400, "Denis M"

This is a very handy and inexpensive monocrystaline set: http://tinyurl.com/34egbt2 I keep mine in the truck.
EzeLaps are polycrystalline, and a tiny bit cheaper, but I prefer the DMTs. (I own both in 600 grit 2x6" plates.) http://tinyurl.com/34txw74
-- Not merely an absence of noise, Real Silence begins when a reasonable being withdraws from the noise in order to find peace and order in his inner sanctuary. -- Peter Minard
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I'd say as long as you kept the bit on pine and maple and oak.
The 'rose' woods will eat it alive - massive amounts of silicon in the wood. The sand will dull edges.
If you must, have a rough one to mill out small amounts at a time and a newer one to to the last fine cut. - Use depth of cut for small cleaner cuts. Work downwards to finally depth.
Keep one for quality work like you tried.
Martin
On 1/2/2011 4:24 AM, Denis M wrote:

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