Porter-Cable Router Bearings

Hi,
I have a dead porter-cable 6912 router, the bearings are shot. Delta is charging almost the cost of a new router to install new bearings...
Has anyone been able to change the bearings themselves? Does the job require a press or special mechanical tools? Does one need to purchase replacement bearings from delta? What would be the part number?
Thanks for any opinion on the subject!
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If you have any kind of Mechanical abilty and a touch of common sense you should be able to get the job done by yourself
Do not order the bearing from PC unless they are about 9 to 12.00each That is about all they should cost. Find an industrial bearing supplier take the old one with you and they will match them up. There is no such thing as propriotory bearings Tool Manufacturers design their tools around the bearing Industry
Good Luck, George

bearings...
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"George M. Kazaka" wrote:

Agreed! Look for a bearing supplier if the factory parts are too expensive. One note of caution here. Routers turn _fast_. If you buy bearings locally you will need to get ones rated for the RPMs of the router. The difference is primarily in the lubrication used. I had to replace the bearing in a die grinder (24k RPM) and used a standard greased bearing, the bearing got so hot it turned blue!. Tried a bearing lubricated with only a light oil and all is happy.
-Bruce
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I replaced the bearing in one of my older routers. The bearing was $10.00 and I was able to save this one.
I was lucky to find locally a store that specializes in bearings, yes bearings !
D.Martin
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Look for a Motion Industries, Applied Industrial Tech. or any number of independent bearing distributors.

Not necessarily true - most try to design around standard bearings but some applications may require special internal clearance, special lubricants etc (but rarely non standard dimensions). Take the bearing with you to one of the distributors and tell them what it was used on and they can provide the proper bearing.
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Tom said:

Yes, Virginia, "Special" dimension bearings DO exist in power tools! And God forbid if it is special AND metric, or simply rather unusual - DAMHIKT. This is one reason I tend to buy Delta stuff, rather than Ryobi and such. In addition to *having* a replacement parts division, I have yet to see a special bearing in any Delta/PC product I own. Every bearing I have looked at in my jointer, planer, drill press, table saw, bandsaw, etc. is a commonly available, generic bearing. I don't know about the bottom feeder stuff, but the middle and top line stuff is quite generic. Ryobi and apparently Ridged as well, have no intention of providing service parts. They consider it disposable. JMHO,
Greg G.
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In typed:

Not on a router, but I changed the arbor bearings on an old Delta TS. There is a bearing number on the side of one of the races. Take that number to any local industrial supply that carries bearings and you should be able to get replacements. The only thing you may need is a bearing puller if the bearing is press fitted on the shaft. If it is, you can even take it to a local auto repair shop and likely get the bearings removed cheaply. Mine were mounted into recesses on the arbor bracket, so I was able to "pound" them out.
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Be careful taking only the number to the distributor. Most bearing races are stamped with the basic part number which does not reference seals, shields, internal clearance etc. If you get the number from the shield it will only reference one shield (or seal) as this is usually the part number for the seal or shield only. In other words, the bearing may be stamped 6200 and the shield stamped 6200Z but if there is a shield on both sides, the designation will be 6200ZZ (possibly followed by C/3 and maybe some other numbers). It's safest to take the bearing with you to the distributor so they can give you the proper replacement.
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Tom said:

Absolutely accurate advise! Godl Star for Tom. <g>
Greg G.
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On Thu, 18 Dec 2003 17:44:23 +0000, Claire cormeau wrote:

Should not be a big problem to change the bearings. The part numbers will be stamped on the bearings and a local supplier should be able to get new ones for you if the factory ones are too high. Expect around $7.50 each. Also, on a router or other high speed tool, it is very important to use bearing mount, a liquid like thread locker, in the housing when reassembling the tool. If the bearings have went bad there is a really good chance that they have spun in the housing and the new bearings will not fit tight enough. You will know this is the case if you put the machine back together and it is noisy and has a wa-wa-wa uneven sound to it.
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