portable band saw for job-site?

I love my ancient 14" Delta bandsaw with 6" riser but it's about as portable as a washing machine. As home-renovating is proving more lucrative than cabinet making, does anyone have a recommendation for something well-built that'll fit in an ordinary sedan? Primary use is to cut 2x4s lengthwise with some weird profile to conform to wall/floor etc. (1920-era homes built on sand).
tia Nigel
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portable as a washing machine.

anyone have a

Primary use is to cut 2x4s

homes built on sand).
Why not look at a couple of the smaller Griz units at this URL from Mike Reed(copied from another band saw post)
http://www.grizzly.com/products/items-list.cfm?keyB0010&sort=price
--
Nahmie
Those on the cutting edge bleed a lot.
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A good jig saw would fit in the glove compartment and can do almost the same jobs as a bandsaw. --dave

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sedan?
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Shopsmith 11" on its own power stand. Both are portable. Plenty of them on Ebay. Some people take old Shopsmiths, cut the rails (ways) way down and have a portable power station that can take a jointer, sander, jigsaw. or bandsaw.
Here is an example of a stand alone tool, a jigsaw, but the concept for the bandsaw is the same.
Steve M

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Nigel Burnett wrote:

Take a look at http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumberG840
I don't know if this would work for you or not. I've never used one. Might be worth a try or somebody else must make these things that are a bit more reliable, accurate, ...     mahalo, `    jo4hn
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I think my Bosch saber saw with orbital motion is far superior for this application. It goes through 2" lumber like butter. Wilson

portable as a washing machine.

anyone have a

Primary use is to cut 2x4s

homes built on sand).

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Wilson Lamb responds:

Yup. So does mine. But it doesn't do much on the 4" dimension, which may be what the OP wants. If that's the case, Ryobi has a new 10" bandsaw with built in dust collection that might serve. It's not tiny, but without its legs should fit easily into the back of a 4 door. Worth a trip to HD to check out, I'd say.
Charlie Self "Vote: the instrument and symbol of a freeman's power to make a fool of himself and a wreck of his country." Ambrose Bierce
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On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 17:26:20 -0500, Nigel Burnett

Milwalkee makes a hand-held version- looks like a very well-built machine when I've seen it in the store, and I would imagine there is some way to mount it in a shop-built stand.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)

Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
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thanks for several responses - I'd looked at the Grizzly but the one review on Amazon says POS. Price is right which means that gorgeous Milwaukee is way pricey at US$330. Shopsmith is too much tool.
I am getting a new Bosch 1591 jigsaw for Christmas so that might suffice. The bandsaw was one of the first big tools that I owned and I like its versatility. Re-sawing a 8 or 10' 2x4 along the wide face to taper it from 1 1/2" to 1" over 8' is so easy on a band saw. I've never used a serious jig saw - can it do this and keep a constant thickness over a 3 1/2" depth? If so, maybe the question is moot.
Nigel
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wrote:

portable as a washing machine.

anyone have a

Primary use is to cut 2x4s

(1920-era homes built on sand).

review on Amazon says POS.

US$330. Shopsmith is too

The bandsaw was

Re-sawing a 8 or 10' 2x4 along

saw. I've never used

1/2" depth? If so,

3 1/2" deep will be a challange for any jigsaw, probably impossible with available blades. In renovations any framing lumber that needs this kind of shaping is done with a chainsaw in 15 seconds. Items requiring a band saw are so rare that they can be done in the shop. b
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Battleax writes:

Maybe in your town. And what if it isn't framing lumber, but molding trim?
Charlie Self "Vote: the instrument and symbol of a freeman's power to make a fool of himself and a wreck of his country." Ambrose Bierce
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Well molding trim gets done with a high quality jig saw. and plane to fit.
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On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 21:16:01 -0500, Nigel Burnett

I doubt it... it would be like resawing with a sawzall..
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On Tue, 07 Dec 2004 21:16:01 -0500, Nigel Burnett
......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email

It will take a lot more care and skill than a BS. Like you I love the BS for what you describe. In thicker timber a jigsaw takes care, and will tend to cut at an angle unless you are _very_ careful to turn by turning and not by pushing. Using a fence means the jigsaw has to be set up really wel regarding foot vs fence vs blade. It could be done, but what you describe would be "practice and patience makes perfect". It depends on how good and accurate the finished product has to be.
You will either need a fair bit of practice for only a few jobs, or be doing a lot of extra work if you have a lot of jobs.
Having said that, I have done what you describe. But I could always hide the tapered side, or it was not vital! <G> I would for _sure_ be looking at rough cutting with the jigsaw, then finishing with a hand plane or router in some way. There _is_ an idea, BTW.
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wrote:

I have a band saw and a good Bosch jig saw.
The band saw cuts scribed boards and moldings much better!
Barry
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