poplar turning

A quick follow up on my previous post concerning some poplar, my son has expressed an interest in attemting some turning, with the softness of poplar, how would it work to laminate some stock together and let him give it a shot. Would this type of wood be a good learning material, or am I looking at something that will start shooting peices everywhere? Thanks in advance
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 24 Aug 2003 16:02:20 -0500, M.G. wrote:

I've never tried turning it, but basswood is favored as a nice soft wood among carvers. It seems that turning would favor similar properties. Might want to give it a shot.
david
--
It is of interest to note that while some dolphins are reported to have
learned English -- up to 50 words used in correct context -- no human being
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
My son in law took an interest in woodturning this year and I just went out and "killed a tree" for the firewood pile. We picked out some pieces for him to practise technique on and had a great time for the week they visited. You can spindle turn or create bowls. Don't recommend segmented as wood is green but it cuts real easy. The branch wood has too much stress in it so stick to trunk pieces for turning. I have done this with oak, maple, Juniper, pine. If you don't have access to a woodlot try your local town works dept as they are often cleaning up downed trees etc. If the piece doesn't turn out (pardon the pun) it finds its was to the wood stove and nothing is wasted.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Poplar turns very cleanly and easily; it's not a terribly exciting wood as far as color or grain pattern goes, but it is a fine practice wood or for turnings that'll be painted. Gluing up (with standard yellow glue) to get larger pieces is good too... just make sure you don't have any starved joints and that you let it cure long enough. On a related note, make sure your kid wears a safety face shield - wood, when self-exiting a lathe, can blind, cause serious dental work, and has even been known to kill.
I and many other turners believe the absolutely best practice, as well as "show", woods are those that are free. Just look around your neighborhood for trees being trimmed or removed. Keep an eye out on your way to work or on a day trip in your locale. Ask your neighbors and coworkers to give you a "heads up" if they see or hear of any tree trimming or removals. I guarantee that in short order you'll have more than you know what to do with - but that won't stop you from gathering more! You'll also have turnings made from many woods that just aren't commercially available. (On a politeness and ethics note, just make sure you ask permission prior to carting anything away. Most folks -100% in my experiences- will gladly offer you all you want. A nice gesture is to drop off a turning - big or little - as a thank you.)
Any and every wood out there is good practice wood. The more difficult ones to work will help expand and hone tool useage and technique.
--
Owen Lowe and his Fly-by-Night Copper Company
Offering a shim for the Porter-Cable 557 type 2 fence design.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I use a lot of 2x4 and 2x6 glue ups for test pieces. Just run them through the joiner, yellow glue them and set aside for day or so. Tools have to be sharp or you will get lots of end grind tearout.
Yep, full face shield.
BRuce
Fly-by-Night CC wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I turn mostly aspen ,which should be comparable to poplar, with good results. It just requires more sanding. I never have it come apart unless I'm working a piece with knots or ant holes all through it. Nice to see your working with your son. When I started my son I had to build a box for him to stand on. Now he is teaching me. When you come to the point where the student is teaching the master you will have fulfilled a dream. Have fun.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.