Poplar for Storm Windows

Would Poplar be a suitable choice to make storm windows out of? Does anyone know its decay resistent properties. I plan to paint them. Nevertheless if it is a poor choice I would use an alternative wood.
Thanks, Mark.
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I have never seen poplar specified for exterior use. I don't think it's very good outdoors. I think some nice fir would be a good choice.
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Dean H. wrote:

Poplar would be a _terrible_ choice for outdoor use. It's decay-resistant properties are essentially nonexistent.
Traditionally, window stock was white pine which mills easily and weathers well. Fir isn't a bad choice except it does tend to splinter when milled. If you're only planning on square stock, not such an issue. Cyprus is another choice.
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"Cyprus" would also be a _terrible_ choice. However, 'cypress' might work well. Especially if painted. Cypress is not the "weather proof" wonder many people think. It will last longer than most in a natural state, but not more than 10 years or so. I learned the hard way - built a nice fence from new, air dried cypress lumber, only to see it rot down and collapse after about 15 years.
babygrand
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babygrand wrote:

Yeah, the natives might get restless...a big "oopsies" there for sure, good buddy... :)
However, 'cypress' might work well. Especially if painted. ...
Of course...pine/fir/whatever should be protected _somehow_ for exterior use. Paint is normally the protection of choice and I would presume it a given for the application.
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That's a bit odd, but fifteen years isn't too bad, depending on the exposure and construction. Fences aren't forever, which will come to quite a surprise when all of these vinyl abominations...errr, fences start falling apart. Before the vinyl fence lynch mob arrives, let me say that I've seen a very few good examples of vinyl fencing. Few and far between.
I lived in New Orleans - home of abused wood structures - and Cypress held up as well as anything except teak and the like. You can drive by cypress groves that were logged 50 years ago and the stumps are still standing there like they were cut last year.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

I agree that seems a little shortlived for CYPRESS :) under most circumstances.
I also agree (what! we're 2 for 2???!!!) on the abominations...
I also have to say I've seen darn little oak exterior finish work, and don't think it particularly good choice for screens, particularly if they are to be removed frequently as they're going to be far heavier than necessary which, depending on the geometry and the access, could lead to higher likelihood of breaking windows, etc. from "woops!" I say that having had to change them every spring/fall on grandparent's two-story house for lo! those many years growing up... :(
White pine is really afaik the longtime most popular choice, at least everywhere except the West Coast where it wasn't easily obtainable.
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Check the old houses here in New England. I notice you say "oak" without pointing out that red oak is a poor exterior wood, and white is superior. Which oak do most home centers sell? The wrong one. How many trim guys nowadays would even know the difference? <G>
I would imagine the preference for pine is usually cost.

Very possibly, but that depends on the design. Some of the nicest and most durable antique screens, storm doors, and exterior shutters I've seen are white oak., as are some new ones locally installed in very high-end (think casino bigwig) homes. Mahogany, too! <G>
My brother-in law has a large number of cold frames on his farm we built from 60-80 year old white oak storm windows recovered from the dump. The same farm is on "reclaimed" industrial land land that made crating for Pratt & Whitney engine parts in the 60's and 70's, folding in '73. On the back 40 were crates made back then. The crates were never painted or stained. They were gray but still in solid shape, with very little rot or insect damage. We actually used some of them around the farm. In the same pile were badly decayed plywood items and construction lumber.
White oak can most definitely be heavy in a beefy design which I'd agree might be tough on a ladder. Personally, my favorite painted outdoor trim nowadays is plastic. <G>
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Never! Years ago, before I knew better, I covered an exterior wall with poplar battens. Even though it was well painted, the damn thing rotted within a year. I didn't ask beforehand, and only wanted to use an inexpensive wood.
Joel
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On Fri, 22 Jun 2007 10:26:21 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Poplar is really bad outside.
White oak (but not red) is excellent, and pine is decent. Cedar is very decay resistant, but soft, so it's less suitable for thin parts.. Some lumber dealers can get lower grades of white oak for very reasonable prices. It's used for truck decking, durable pallets, and old-school exterior trim. If the windows are going to be removed and replaced as seasons change, handled often, or have thin structural parts, I'd look into white oak.
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It rots if you look at it sideways in any exposed use.
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dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderstone.ca wrote:

Well, sure, if it's exposed. Keep a good coat of paint on it, though, and it lasts a long time.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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