Pool table legs

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PDQ wrote:

That's in Kanada right?

Down here, in the USSA, many bars have 7' tables, and they are generally called Bar Boxes. Where I live, most bars have 8' tables. In my lifetime, I don't recall ever seeing a table larger than 9'.

and even usurped the name "Billiards" to refer to the game of "9Ball"?
There is some confusion down here regarding Billiards. Billiards refers to all cue sports. There is pocket billiards, known as pool, and carom billiards. Both pocket billiards and non-pocket billiards fall under billiards. Many think only pocketless billiards is billiards. The term has been abused and confused the world over. In the USSA, 9 ball is always considered pool. Some people don't think it is billiards, usually by those who never heard of 3Cushion or other carom sports.

> appear until small bars tried to permit some sporting by getting sub-standard sized tables > with coin machines incorporated. The 4'X8' tables were reserved for "Bang Ball" aka >Rotation", "Spots&Stripes", "9Ball" and "Golf". Snooker and Pocket Billiards were concidered >"The only proper pool games". I only ever played true Billiards (no pockets in the table) once.

3C is no more a billiards sport than any other cue sport. As far as Cuemanship, all cue sports require true cuemanship to excel. Generally though, only 3C players get snobby about it:-)
I would need binoculars to see the end of a 14' table. I started out on 9' tables and still enjoy them, but my eyes prefer 7'.
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Jack
Got Change: USA =====> USSA!
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I've done some internet searching, but all that showed me was 4 legs, one in each corner. Massive looking things, too. I guess that's the popular style now.

*snip*
I've got an idea on how to build the legs quickly, inexpensively, and relatively easily. I might run in to some problems mortising for the braces, but that's simply lack of experience.
When the table eventually fails or gets replaced, I'll keep the legs and put some other table on top!
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper wrote:

I guess you didn't look at the two links I listed above. One uses a simple box style leg that only looks massive, and the other is a cabriole leg, not massive. Both links are for building your own table, and have ample pictures of how they do the legs.
If you go to my web page, under Billiards, you will find links to about 40 sites for pool tables, and about every one has pictures of tables with both massive looking, and non-massive looking legs.
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Jack
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

1x1's would be sufficient to hold it up! Have you seen the drawer units under water beds? 1/2" and 3/4" sticks are used. Larger legs afford you the opportunity to properly brace the legs so that there is absolutely no to very little detectable movement, especially when you hop up on the table to take a shot or set your girl friend up there to take a different kind of shot. ;~) With out proper rigidity the table moves when you bump it and the balls relocate.
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On 28 Oct 2009 23:37:37 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:>Just a quick question:

I have an old 40's ish Gandy table. the legs are 3/4" partical board with veneer on them. they have a block in the top and the bottom of 2" mahagany. 2 sides are longer to form an "L" that wraps around the corner of the frame. this "L" is bolted to the frame on those 2 sides. This is a comercial table that spent the first 40 years of its life in a pool room. It is still rock solid after all these years believe it or not! this table has a 3 piece slate top 1" thick. I would guess the wieght to be around 800 LBS fully assembled. strength is not so much the issue as lateral support is. you dont want the table moving laterally. [as the pedulum swings and all that!]
skeez
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