Polyurethane over laquer?


I've been trying my hand at veneer inlays. Deft spray laquer seems to give a great looking finish, but I doubt if it would stand under wet drinks. Any ideas as to how polyurethane as a protective top coat would bond to a laquer finish
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Bubba wrote:

apply dewaxed shellac, and then the (ugh) poly?
dave
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The "(ugh) poly" tells me something. I'm open to ideas. What is the objection to poly? What are viable alternatives. The surface will be used as a tray and from time to time will be exposed to a variety of liquids including alcohol.

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Bubba wrote:

tell you poly looks bad. I don't think that's true unless you pile it on. But for application, I prefer spraying water bornes. They can be recoated in under 40 minutes and don't stick to everything around the spray area. Brushing poly often results in bubbles and it dries too slowly for me. Thin the poly to reduce bubbles. Spraying it makes on heck of a mess due to the sticky residue of overspray. Dust can settle on a slow drying finish like poly. I can't recall seeing any appreciable dust nibs on my water borne finishes. But the poly is gonna be more water resistant than WB even with Crosslinker added so I can appreciate why you'd choose poly. I've got a poly'd desktop that is softer (after more than a year after the finish was applied) than WB/Crosslinker that has set for a couple of weeks, BUT the poly does better on the water torture test...
Dave
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I've sprayed WB Varathane with sat results. Have you tried it?

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nospambob wrote:

their god-awfully slow drying Varathanes back in the 70's. Not that a WB would be slow drying, but I tend to avoid certain brands like the plague, such as Minwhacks and others that I've had less than stellar results with. sometimes my biggest issue is not the final results, but the odor, slow drying, or other bugaboo.
Dave
Dave
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My history with Flecto Varathane goes back to the 50s and working with oil based shtuff was the norm. Several tries of the upstart WB products certainly didn't convince me they were even headed in the right direction. Update to today, all is well! Oil stuff is phasing out of the cabinet being replaced with WB stuff including WB lacquer. Get a small can of Varathane Diamond (believe that's the WB) gloss and TRY it, you might be pleasantly pleased!

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nospambob wrote:

mistake of applying gloss to some fluted door trim and rosettes. I had to recoat with semi and even that was a tad shinier than I like. Satin's more my pleasure. But as far as the product goes, I'll concede that Diamond may be a whole nuther ball game than their other stuff I've used in years past.
Dave
Dave
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I prefer the clear view that gloss provides without the flatting ingredient and it can be toned down with abrasive pads to whatever sheen desired.

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nospambob wrote:

obscure the wood when you choose the flattened sheens), but for items with lots of difficult to sand nooks and crannies, trying to tame the gloss after the finish is applied can be a PITA.
Dave
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Point taken, thanks.

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Why not learn to apply polyurethane and skip the lacquer? Yes, it will take longer to cure increasing the likelihood of dust nibs but the sandwich you are asking about is asking for trouble.
How much water are you talking about? Lacquer has moderate water and water vapor resistance, poly has pretty good resistance.
Good Luck.

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