polyurethane


Hello, I know it should be the most rewarding part of woodworking but I really hate applying a finish to my projects. I guess because im not very good at it or don't understand it very well. I watch Woodworks on DIY and noticed when David Marks applies a tung oil finish he buffs it with a clean rag immediately after applying it. I was just wondering if this can be done with polyurethane as well? I tried it and if I wipe it off right away the rag doesn't stick to the wood. Is this a good idea to be doing this? When I just brush it on and leave it , it doesn't come out well at all. I see drips and runs and brush marks. If wiping off this finish is an option it will make finishing much more enjoyable for me. Thank You Rich Petruso
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They sell wiping poly just for this purpose. I make my own all the time. I use Minwax high resin poly and mix it half and half with mineral spirits. You have to mix it very well to get it to blend.
Paint it on and wipe it off with a somewhat saturated smooth cloth. I use old tee shirts.
At this diluted level I do two coats at least 4 hours apart, usually 24. Then very lightly hand sand with 320. Wipe down with spirits. Apply a third coat. When dry I buff it out a bit w/0000 steel wool and some good wax.
If the wood is porous, like Pine, I either mix the poly stronger or do more coats. I still just sand and polish the last two coats.
No runs or brush marks at all. If you are using semi gloss or satin, make sure not to let it build up in crevices, cracks, etc, or it will be much glossy-er in those locations. If that does happen, the wool will remove the gloss with a little elbow grease.
This is the only way I apply poly but I only use poly for plant stands or table tops or other high use or possibly wet surfaces. Other than that I like to spray lacquer.
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Hi I am a student at Central Michigan University in the Industrial Technology major. Finishing has always been fun for me since I learned the basics. First poly and lacquer are top coats. These are made to protect the finishes under them. Poly is best applied with a brush since it is thick and takes a long time to dry . Lacquer on the other hand is best applied with a sprayer. Remember these are top coats. Tungs oil, oil and water type stains and many penetrating type oils can be rub immediately, but don't rub poly or lacquer till it dries. let me know if there are any more questions. Ron EDU 290
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snipped-for-privacy@cmich.edu wrote:

Ron:
We are going to have to teach you about the wipe-on poly that us lazy old f**ts use. :-)
Just never suggest staining cherry and applying poly or someone in this group will hunt you down and... I still have scars. :-o
Welcome!
--
Will
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On Wed, 13 Apr 2005 16:24:43 -0400, the inscrutable WillR

Poly is best applied to the trash can.

Please don't start the young'uns off on the wrong foot. Suggest Waterlox or T&T Varnish Oil instead.

"AS WELL YOU SHOULD!" he whispered.
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Richard J Petruso wrote:

Use wipe-on polyurethane. It works fine for me. I think it is really just a thinned down polyurethane -- but other people here may know for sure. I think ours is by Minwax.
I don't get drips or wipe marks etc.
Then use steel wool to get rid of any dust motes or minor blemishes -- extra fine is what I use -- Then a bit of wax -- Johnsons paste wax for example.
Polishes up beautifully.
Also had some reasonably good results with Minwax Antique Oil finish. Not sure what exactly it is -- trade secret I guess. It gives a very nice wipe on finish as well.
My brushes really aren't used that much any more -- although sometimes I will brush a finish and then wipe if it is more convenient.
For the wipe on finishes you _MUST_ have a breathing mask with an organic vapor filter. Your local hardware should be able to supply.
Also -- learn how to dispose of the rags safely. That is _important_. See a previous thread about a school fire due to finishing rags.
Have fun -- hope this helps.
PS: Don't ever talk about using wipe on poly on cherry wood in this newsgroup -- it's bad form. The Stain police will get you -- and it's a life sentence. :-)
--
Will
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Don't ask us, try it yourself. You will very quickly find out why it is a dreadful idea.
I use mainly wiping varnish. Much easier, and no drips or runs. Okay, it takes longer because you have to put on twice as many coats; but it goes fast.
FWIW, I find commercial wiping varnish works better than homemade; though I don't know why.
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toller wrote:

I haven't had any problems with homemade wiping varnish. I make my own by using spar varnish, turps and linseed oil. I mix it in different proportions depending on what I hope to achieve, but the basic formula is equal parts of each.
While it's not my favorite finish (shellac and oil/wax finishes are), it is useful for some things where you need a bit of extra protection. (For example, I used it on the laminated fishing net I made recently.) IMHO, the best part of it is that you can easily control the level of build and the "plasticity" of the finish. Plus, you can tint it with artists oils if you need to achieve a particular look.
Chuck Vance
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You made a fishing net out of wood? I hope you don't take up skydiving. ;-)
Ken Muldrew snipped-for-privacy@ucalgazry.ca (remove all letters after y in the alphabet)
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Ken Muldrew wrote:

Silly Canuckistani. I made the *frame* out of wood:
http://uweb.txstate.edu/~cv01/net03.jpg
:-)
Chuck Vance
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Very nice, but aren't you worried about getting fish slime stuck in the beading groove?
Suggestion: make a pair and then you'll have a quick conversion to snowshoes next time you come North.
Ken Muldrew snipped-for-privacy@ucalgazry.ca (remove all letters after y in the alphabet)
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Ken Muldrew wrote:

Well, yeah ... but I'd have to *catch* a fish first.

Heh, you guys all think alike. SWMBO thought I *was* making snowshoes. :-)
Chuck Vance
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On Thu, 14 Apr 2005 14:07:30 -0500, the inscrutable Conan The

"No, dear. They're not snowshoes. It so happens that I'll be playing tennis with the trout next week and..."
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Richard J Petruso wrote:

You aren't using the brush properly...
1. Use a *good* natural bristle brush. 2. Flow the finish on. That means move the brush slowly letting the finish flow from the brush. Too slowly results in too much finish...takes a bit of practice. 3. Blend from one area to another so you have an equal amount everywhere. Keep a wet edge. 4. It really helps to have your surface horizontal so the finish will self-level (no brush marks). 5. It also helps to have a light at a low angle ahead of you so you can see holidays (missed areas) and drips. If you are getting drips and runs consistently you are applying too much finish. ______________

Sure its an option. Still nice to be able to brush on a nice finish though...
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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I have achieved good (as good as can be expected with poly-urine-stain) results with the cheap, dispose of when done, foam brushes available at the borg. The key is not applying too much finish regardless of what type and sand/steel wool between coats.

Very important

Yes, but you should be able to finish vertical surfaces if you are not applying too much finish.

Absolutely
Frank
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Richard J Petruso says...

His tung oil finish is a mixture with tung oil, linseed oil and polyurethane. I'm not sure if he makes it or it is a name brand product that he doesn't want to advertise. Obviously he doesn't intend to build up a thick film and fill the pores with this technique. You can buy wipe-on finishes or make your own by taking any brush-on finish and thinning it to wipe-on consistency. The trick with brushing finishes is to make your coats as thin as possible, but the thinnest brush-on coat is still pretty thick. When your brush gets dry, go back over what you just applied and draw up excess finish and spread it elsewhere. Have lights placed so that you can see glare off the freshly brushed finish. This will let you see dry spots as well as runs. If you catch a run before it sets up, it can easily be removed. I've found that with a little practice, brushing varnish (including polyurethane) isn't very difficult at all, but you always have to sand it smooth between coats because some dust inevitably settles on the varnish and the next coat needs a rough surface to bond with.
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What Marks is using is a product called "Arm-R-Seal" It is the perfect finish for those of us with out the talent/area or inclination. I've used it almost exclusively for years...a great finish.
Schroeder

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Don't ask us, try it yourself. You will very quickly find out why it is a dreadful idea.
I use mainly wiping varnish. Much easier, and no drips or runs. Okay, it takes longer because you have to put on twice as many coats; but it goes fast.
FWIW, I find commercial wiping varnish works better than homemade; though I don't know why.
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