Polyshades


I would like a little feedback concerning the Polyshades product. I've used this crap twice and have had bad luck both times. The directions read that you must keep a wet edge, but I keep getting streaks or gummed-up dark spots. Has anyone had much luck with this product?
Thanks..... -- Chris
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I have used it a couple times with exactly the same result. Bad product with one good use; if the old finish is too much trouble to remove, the polyshades will go on right over the old finish. It still gobs and drips, but you can't have everything. I have only needed it for that once.
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Polyshades is essentially a polyurethane toner. It appears to contain pigments as well as dyes. It is the pigments that cause multiple coats to eventually hide any visible wood grain. It starts to behave like paint in that respect when multiple coats are applied.
The streaks are due to overlapped brush strokes. The areas where the strokes have overlapped are the equivalent of two coats of Polyshades. That makes them darker or more opaque than the areas where there is just a single brush stroke. I suggest that you thin out the Polyshades about 20% with mineral spirits, try to get just the thinnest overlap between brush strokes, and that you tip off freshly polyurethaned areas.
Gummed up dark spots suggest inadequate mixing of the product or a very thick coat at those spots.
I have used this product a few times when I am too lazy to make my own toner. It works as advertised but you have to understand its limitations. Minwax won't really tell you what they are.
Good Luck.

used
that
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Chris, Try using a foam brush, and brushing it out WELL. Use a VERY THIN coat and build up to the desired color/tone.
I've used the stuff a couple of times . . . in 'Burma Teakwood'. If you put it on per the instructions on the can, it looks like a reddish-black paint. I've also used it like a 'stain', slathering it on, then waiting a few minutes and wiping it off - sometimes having to slather on more to dissolve some gummy areas.
I did this about 7 years ago to simulate that 'classic Chris Craft stern' on a Norwegian-style tender I built. Last year the owner called me. He had damaged a small part and wanted it replaced. When I looked at it, it was obvious the boat had no upkeep - but the hull *seemed* sound. Until we turned it over. It wasn't just a 'small part', but both transoms had rotted out . . . from the inside . . . because it had been stored in contact with wet ground !! HOWEVER, the outside where I had fiberglass & epoxy covered them and used the Polyshades, overcoated with Spar varnish . . . except for some dirt, looked just like they had left the shop.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop {NO - I am not a heretic, but I am a heathen}

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Thin 20 -30 %, foam brush and work fast.

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