Polyeurethane for interior of an exterior door

I have just finished sanding and staining the interior of an exterior door. Should I use interior or exterior polyeurethane on it? I'd prefer to use the interior variety because I happen to have it, but I'm not sure if I should use that or the exterior version, presumably since this is an exterior door and even the inside of the door will be subject to more hot/cold swings than an interior door would. Other than that I can't think of any compelling reason to use the exterior variety.
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I have 5 doors that lead to the exterior and were protected with exterior spar varnish (marine grade) on the exterior and interior poly on the interior. The finish was applied about ten years ago and is still in very good condition. I have one exterior door on a storeroom that was finished with the same latex trim paint as the house trim; applied less than a year ago. I can tell it will not last.
Max
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Interior for the inside, exterior for the outside. Temperature and moisture are not as much of a concern as direct sunlight. Exterior finishes hold up well with the absence of sun light. With sun light, exterior finishes typically have to be reapplied every 2 to 4 years. The outer side of my exterior door does not get direct sun light and the finish is 25 years old.
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You can use any exterior paint/stain/varnish/poly inside. Not the other way around, no interior outside. Some may argue but hey, I've done this for over 25 years without any problems. Saves on material as well. john
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Was that different from what I said. One exception to using an exterior on the inside. If you use an exterior spar varnish it may always feel sticky.
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OK, I would agree that the VOC's in many exterior finishes are not something that one would want in the house, particularly a closed house. OTH, if its spring/summer/fall and nice outside and the windows can be opened, I say paint away. I have used spar varnish, boat grade oil finishes, high gloss paints, exterior primer on nasty bathroom walls, on and on. All however were used with lots of ventilation, fan(s), windows open, etc. If you can't ventilate don't use the stuff in the house. Call me dumb if you'd like, that's OK. john
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You can use any exterior paint/stain/varnish/poly inside. Not the other way around, no interior outside. Some may argue but hey, I've done this for over 25 years without any problems. Saves on material as well. john
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You can use any exterior paint/stain/varnish/poly inside. Not the other way around, no interior outside. Some may argue but hey, I've done this for over 25 years without any problems. Saves on material as well. john
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jk wrote:

some exterior finishing materials are not suitable for interior use. toxic off-gassing is one issue, flexible curing films is another.
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Could you repeat that 3 times... :~)
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