Plywood Storage

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My next project is going to be to make a plywood storage system. Because I have limited space, I am planning on making a storage system that hangs from the ceiling.
Has anyone here done this before?
I waste a lot of plywood because it eventually gets ruined in my shop w/o a dedicated storage system.
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On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 17:23:46 -0800 (PST), GarageWoodworks

What sort of roof does it have? Loading may be a problem.

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The ceiling in my woodshop (garage) is the floor to the second floor above. Should be able to hold it.
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"GarageWoodworks" wrote:

---------------------------------------- Consider the following:
A 4'x8'x1/2" sheet of CDX weighs over 40 lbs.
Storing that kind of weight and size overhead is a tad more difficult than pushing on a rope.
Lew
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Ok. You got me thinking Lew. Need to rethink this.
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wrote:

Ok. You got me thinking Lew. Need to rethink this. ================================== If you are going to lift large, unwieldy sheets of plywood overhead, you will need to devise a method of lifting them. Unless, of course, you are super strong and muscular. ;)
It is not just the weight. Plywood under the best of circumstances is clumsy. Tight spaces and lifting just makes it that much more difficult.
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On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 23:43:46 -0500, the infamous "Lee Michaels"

Pulling one down usually takes a second person on a ladder.
http://fwd4.me/BNe My dovetailed <titter> plywood cart. I ended up running the pipe up into the attic for more tilt-proofing, finding that a few sheets of ply have a very high center of mass and and are an easy tip. Also, I have to rearrange the entire shop to get to my wood. Luckily, all the tools are on 5" casters or mobile bases. I went with 5" casters because one can roll right over an air hose and never feel it.
-- What helps luck is a habit of watching for opportunities, of having a patient, but restless mind, of sacrificing one's ease or vanity, of uniting a love of detail to foresight, and of passing through hard times bravely and cheerfully. -- Charles Victor Cherbuliez
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On 1/13/2010 10:43 PM, Lee Michaels wrote:

Overhead storage of bulky, unwieldy and heavy items in a known area of limited space sounds very much to me like congressional problem solving funded by taxpayer dollars.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 10/22/08
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"GarageWoodworks" wrote:

--------------------------------------------- Might consider building a heavy duty 4'x8' table, say 42" high, then store plywood on table top and storage underneath.
The ply stays flat and you reclaim the floor space for alternate storage area.
Lew
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Or perhaps a 4'x10' table and store the plywood underneath.

A 4' wide table is still a lot of wasted space. Reaching the back isn't easy. Cabinets across the back would work but anything on the table gets in the way.
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If you've got the space in the center of your shop for a 4x8 (or 4 1/2 by 8 1/2) you could build a workbench and store the ply underneath. Put casters on a bottom sheet of plywood, and you could even roll it out from under the table when you need it. The plywood would be stored flat and you'd have a workbench that's not all wasted space.
Shove this up against the wall, and you'll lose the 2' as noted above. Consider that you'll need at least 3' of work area around 3 edges of the table, and you'll have to bump the space requirements up to 4' for the side the plywood comes out. Most garshops can't handle this.
Puckdropper
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

That works. Only problem is that the sheet I want is always on the bottom :(
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A 4x8 work surface..... Now that would be nice....if I had room for that, but If I ever do,,,,, that will work.
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Good idea - but how about a larger table and store the sheets below the top on say three shelves. Using the old numbers - 1/4, 1/2, 3/4. Center of a room and use the table from all sides.
Martin
Lew Hodgett wrote:

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"Martin H. Eastburn" wrote:

-------------------------------- That's called a table saw run out table<G>.
Lew
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On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 20:27:44 -0800, GarageWoodworks wrote:

I attached some tapered supports (1.5" at the bottom, 0.25" at the top) 4' high to some studs on the back wall. Above that I mounted some brackets for lumber storage.
This supports the plywood every 24" and I've seen no evidence of sagging after many years.
It wouldn't work if you buy plywood a dozen sheets at a time, but for storing 3 or 4 full sheets and a small accumulation of smaller pieces, it works fine.
It would be a PITA if I needed to get at the plywood every day, but I don't.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 19:21:57 -0800, the infamous "Lew Hodgett"

Think "4'x8'x3/4" oak", Lew. Makes your shoulders ache.
-- What helps luck is a habit of watching for opportunities, of having a patient, but restless mind, of sacrificing one's ease or vanity, of uniting a love of detail to foresight, and of passing through hard times bravely and cheerfully. -- Charles Victor Cherbuliez
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Hey Brian, Do you have space for a triangled cart? I know it may seem a bit cumbersome to have to wheel it out of the way when necessary but it keeps your sheet goods closer to the ground so you won't be straining to fight gravity when you are filling or emptying your storage rack. Everything you need- sheet good wise - is right there to see, plus you could roll the stock up to your table saw or work bench for easier placement. Marc
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Considered that, but it would constantly be in the way. I don't use ply very often so having it above shouldn't be an issue.
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On Wed, 13 Jan 2010 18:43:40 -0800 (PST), the infamous GarageWoodworks

I did some welded up 5/8" square tubing brackets for my 2' x 2' x 8' overhead, but it was for large boxes, not ply. The HF tig was my required new tool for that.
Are you going to put 2 of them above the garage door, Brian? You'll need plenty of takedown area, a long slot for each. Do you have that kind of room in your gar^H^H^Hshop, mon?
GIFs at 11, I presume? Bueno.
-- What helps luck is a habit of watching for opportunities, of having a patient, but restless mind, of sacrificing one's ease or vanity, of uniting a love of detail to foresight, and of passing through hard times bravely and cheerfully. -- Charles Victor Cherbuliez
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