Plywood eats carbide?


Have you ever run into plywood that messes up carbide?
I just finished a vanity using poplar ply that I bought from a local hardwood supplier. By the time I finished, my saw blade was tearing and burning and so were my router bits. I looked at the bits under a magnifier and they were not only dull, but there were chips in the edges.
I took a diamond stone to a 1/2" straight bit and worked it to a nice edge. Then I made a few shallow grooves in the plywood. At first, it cut clean and easy, but soon began to burn again. When I examined the bit it had chips.
I would sort of expect this with particle board, but not plywood.
I've got about a quarter sheet of it left and I'm thinking maybe I'll just toss it.
Don
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Don Wheeler wrote:

The glue lines are very hard--you see the result. Depending on the source, some may be worse than others. I've not used enough sheet goods since the real swamping of supplies w/ inexpensive imported stuff to know whether they're using cheaper glues that might be even more damaging than older G-P and/or Weyerhauser ply or not...anybody??
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On Thu, 14 Jul 2005 16:24:38 -0500, Duane Bozarth wrote:

I've used several different types of hardwood plywood, but the stuff that ate my blades was the "maple" multiply from the Orange Borg. The glue is hard as rocks and really dulled an blades used on it. A lot worse than any other plywood I've ever used. I won't make that mistake again, even for the price.
DGA
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Don Wheeler (in Xns9693909E98B6Fcowabunga@216.196.97.142) said:
| Have you ever run into plywood that messes up carbide?
It's not the wood as much as it's the glue that eats the edges. Even carbide cutting edges are subject to wear and tear.
I've found that some carbide tools hold up better than others. You might want to keep track of which blades/bits do best and which do worst - and shop accordingly.
I'm still eagerly awaiting (toothed) saws and router bits with industrial diamond cutting edges. :-)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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wrote:

I saw some in a magazine this morning. I'll try to dig 'em up for you.
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Yes, so I don't use it any more. I build everything from drywall. Inexpensive, cuts easily, take a nice finish with latex paint. It is the future of woodworking!
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"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message

ROTFL ... and the latest from OSHA is that the white dust contains calcium for stronger bones.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 7/12/05
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Really screws up my dust collection system, though.
Are you finding that your Forrest WWII doesn't give you a glue line rip any more?
Patriarch
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