Plunge or non-plunge router better under table?

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Ah. Nice. Indeed an innovation. But why bother making it a hybrid plunge / fixed? Who is going to ever use it as a plunger under a table?

I was referring to the plunge depth stop, but apparently this isn't an issue based on its design.
Brian.
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You probably would not want to use it as a plunge router under the table. But Suppose you remove it from the table and want to use it free hand as a plunge router. You can do that also.
Take a look here for a detailed review. I am not trying to change your mind here. Just a very interesting review with pictures. Note that the review was on the first release routers and the problem areas have been addressed. I read the review including the "1 year later" review about 4 times before seriousely considering the Triton.
Initial review http://www.mv.com/users/besposito/woodworking/triton /
The 1 year later review can be found at http://www.mv.com/users/besposito/woodworking /
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Too big for a freehand router IMO. But that's just me. I'll read the review.
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Interesting. The router had a slew of issues and yet he still loves it. Looking at what else he has on his site, it doesn't appear as though he's "reviewed" products he didn't like. In any event, I'm suspect this router will serve you fine. Report back after a couple years' worth of mileage and let us know !
Brian.
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At this point if the router simply holds up it will be better than what I have. I have been working with a large Bosch plunger router hanging under the table since 1988. While moving up and down has been an acquired touch, there is so much play that when I let go of the locking lever the bit moves up about 1/16" and over about 1/16".
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Just adding my bit to this. I have been using a Bosch router under a table for quite some time now. Following a suggestion in a woodworking magazine, I removed the springs from the router and supported it using an adjustable car jack. I find that I can get some very accurate adjustments to the router.
I must admit that I am using an old Bosch router table, which could do with changing now. So I am saving up to buy a new table, or build one, hopefully later this year.
John
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G.E.R.R.Y. wrote:

Some plunge routers can be adjusted for height with the router under the table--the plunge mechanism becomes in effect a router lift. That's not possible with any non-plunge I know of unless you use a router lift. On the other hand, the highest-capacity non-plunge routers can swing a larger diameter bit than the highest capacity plunge routers with the exception, I believe, of the Triton. Really depends on what you want to do and how much you want to spend. A non-plunge router in a lift is from an operational viewpoint a more satisfactory solution IMO, but it's also more expensive.
--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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Huh? Unless you disable the springs, the plunge routers become twice as heavy to lift or adjust under the table. Now if you are talking avout the fine tune adjustments that some plunge routers are capable of making, I agree.

Lets see, Bosch, Porter Cable, DeWalt, Milwaukee all make fixed base routers that have the ability to raise and lower in minute increments if necessary when used in a router table.
On the other hand, the highest-capacity non-plunge routers can swing a larger

And the 1611 Bosch, 1619 Bosch, 3612 Makita, DeWalt 625, and the M12V Hitachi can easily handle wide raised panel bits. These are all plunge routers and some of them have been around since the 80's.
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You're right it is harder to use with the springs still in, but if you only have a few different profiles to cut, then the one or two adjustments even with the springs in are not that difficult. I've got a Makita 3612BR and for those times when I know I'm going to have multiple adjustments to make, I remove the springs first and after that, all adjustments are really easy.
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Non-plunge = fixed. But I prefer a plunge also. Why, that's how I started and it works for me. Mark L.
G.E.R.R.Y. wrote:

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By the way, here is Pat Warner's take. He's someone to listen to. :-)
http://www.patwarner.com/plunge_or_fixed.html
Brian.

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Thanks to all who posted responses. You guys are the best. You've NEVER let me down when I've needed advice.
Gerry
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