Plugs for pocket holes made with Kreg jig

I just had my first occasion to make a set of glass doors using pocket hole joinery to hold the frame pieces. They came out great. I bought some pocket hole plugs but was surprised to see how much the were above the surface of the frame (or as Norm would say -- "proud" of the surface). They stick up about 1/8" Clearly I can sand them down but it will take a lot of sanding as they are oak. Has anyone used these plugs and have you had the same experience?
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Yep...... They sand down easy..

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That depends on how deep you drill the hole, and the shape of the screw head. They probably make them a little long in case you need to drill the hole deeper.
Another option is to make your own - cut a 3/8 dowel off at 45 degrees, tap it in, and use a flush cutting saw to trim it (like you would any other dowel plug).
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Actually, they sand down pretty quickly. Cutting them off with a flush trim saw after the glue dries, then sanding, is even quicker.
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hit 'em with a flush cutting saw, then sand. Wouldn't you be bummed if they made them too shallow! :)
dave
Dick Snyder wrote:

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Thanks everybody for your quick suggestions regarding the flush cutting saw. This group is the greatest!
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On Wed, 17 Dec 2003 22:06:45 -0500, "Dick Snyder"

Start with a plane, finish with sandpaper or a scraper. The plane will knock them down in no time.
Barry
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A sharp chisel or a router takes them down quick. I put two feet on my router to straddle the plugs or dowels in a dowel joint, and cut them off as slick as can be.
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That really is a great tip. I hadn't thought of that but recall now, seeing it in a book somewhere to cut dowels flush. I guess you could set the bit proud of the surface by 1/64" or so.
Only one problem - on an inside corner, you can't get the router in there to cut them. Maybe a laminate trimmer with an offset base?
Jon E
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On Thu, 18 Dec 2003 22:52:57 GMT, "Jon Endres, PE"

Or a flush cut saw? It's a DOWEL, not a 4x4! <G>
Barry
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in message wrote:

Well, yeah, but the topic was router. With a flush cut saw, you have to sand, quite a bit. If you use a router and sharp bit, and a chisel to take off the last hair, you don't need to sand. Sanding sucks.
Jon
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I usually do the trimming before I put the back on. Also, I make the first hole about 2" from the edge so I do'nt have any trouble getting at the plug. If you have a little money and you want what looks like the easiest way to trim: http://www.hoffmann-usa.com/htm/lippingplaner/lippingplaner.htm
It is designed for doing solid wood edging but it should work well for dowels and plugs.
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