Plug advice

I made some sample holes and plugs with a forstener and tapered plug cutter of the same diameter. My problem is that the forstener hole is only going through about 1/2 of the board. So when I insert a plug cut with the same diameter tapered plug cutter, I don't get a snug fit (the tapered end inserts first and doesn't go far enough into the hole to get to the larger diameter of the plug).
So what's the advice? Cut the bottom 1/3 of the plug off to get the larger part of the plug in the hole? Try a larger diameter plgu cutter? I don't think I can go with a smaller forstener hole - tried it and the plug (narrow diameter end) won't go in the hole at all.
Thanks
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ranted:

Cut your plugs in a thicker board but don't break them out, then rip cut the bottom portion away using a band/tablesaw.
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I played around some more with the plug cutter today. According to my eyes and research, the top of the board/plug is narrower than the bottom of the plug. I've also found that the plug cutter won't cut all the way through my 3/4" board. So...
Should I try a thinner board instead of a thicker board - so I can actually get my plug to cut through?
Or are there different depth plug cutters that I should be trying to get all the way through 3/4"?
Or am I stuck to where I should just partial cut a bunch of plugs in my 3/4" board (as deep as the cutter will let me), and then rip cut the board to cut the plugs out of the board?
Thanks
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ranted:

Right, they're slightly tapered so the cutter clears it. The plug gets tighter as it's pounded into the hole due to that taper.

I have some large plug cutters but have never used them, so I'm working off theory here. Yes, there are large and small plug cutters, straight vs. tapered plug cutters, etc. Lee Valley has some tapered cutters that are supposed to be quite good.

Yes, try cutting as deeply as possible, mark that depth on the board, and rip the bottom off. That gives you the widest dia. You might also have to rip the top layer off, so try a couple in small stock first, then cut from there. It all depends on your application, the type of wood, etc. If you have to cut the narrowest section off, you might either try another style of plug cutter with a wider taper or use a smaller clearance drill for the screw hole.
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OK, Corey. I think I see your issue. These things are not entirely intuitive to begin with.
The smooth, narrow end goes down. The ragged end, ragged because you broke it off of the partially through drilled board, sticks out.
The narrow end of the tapered plug goes into the hole, and the thick end stands proud, after gluing. The wide end is then removed, with a chisel, plane, flush cutting saw and/or sanding device.
By the way, the best wood to use for cutting plugs is an offcut from the same project you're working on. Color, grain, density, etc., all match as closely as will likely ever happen.
Patriarch
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"patriarch snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcastDOTnet>" <<patriarch> wrote in message

Be sure to cut a fairly deep plug also. That way, the tapered part is smaller and easier to insert into the hole that was drilled. If you don't plunge close to full depth, they can be a PITA to insert.
Experiment a bit. I always use the same wood and it you match the grain, they are almost invisible when sanded. OTOH, a slight difference can show off the plugs and they look good in certain applications, like lawn furniture.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I think a slight difference looks sorry, personally. If it isn't going to be a good match (a retrofit job with an old piece, say, where you don't have any of the original wood) I like to cut them out of something that contrasts wildly. Walnut plugs in maple, or vice versa. It's quite striking to my eye. You can rotate the grain so that it's perpendicular to the contrasting piece for an even stronger effect.
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Hey Corey.. how's the class going? you seem to be learning a lot, as your questions are getting more sophisticated...
I just finished my 1st project with plugs... using the plug cutter that came with my dowel point kit years ago, but I'd never used the cutter.. I was working with 1/2" and 3/4" thick poplar and the "pluggable" depth was 1/4" (from top of screw head to wood surface.. Being lazy and not having access to a thickness planer, I bought a 2' piece of 1/4 x 2 1/2" poplar and cut my plugs from that... it went amazingly well, considering that I had no idea what I was doing..
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I went ahead last night and bought a 1/2" thick strip to try cutting plugs out of. It worked great on my test last night. The cutter was able to cut all the way through, so I don't have the rip a 3/4" to get the plug. It fit night and tight in my hole, and I was able to cut it flush and sand it to where you couldn't really notice the plug without knowing and looking for it. The wife was impressed (she has a concerning eye) and gave me the green light.
Though I have a new problem that I'll be creating a new thread on.
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GOOD JOB!
Hey, if you didn't have new questions or problems, it would mean that you either didn't want to learn or weren't working on wood, Corey..
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