Plexiglass

I need some help!!!!!
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Some times I do to.
Cutting? Scratch a line with a steel hook/barbed object over and over until the scratch is about 1/16" deep. then break along the line like glass. Most hardware stores sell a cheep $3-$4 tool that resembles a Pocket knife for scoring the line.
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On Fri, 30 Mar 2007 12:54:54 GMT, "Leon"

That's the way to go. Get this tool specifically made to cut plastic, about $5. You can cut plexi on a tablesaw with a turned-around blade, but it is nasty without a LOT of ventilation.
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I get a nice clean cut using a scroll saw. If you put clear sealing tape on both sides it acts as a lubricant and keeps the plastic from melting.
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ray wrote:

I also have used a jig saw with a fine tooth blade for nominal 1/10 inch material. Masking tape worked also to protect the cut line and prevent melting.
Does anyone know where to get the glue that is used to join the material - basically a solvent weld. Or what is the solvent used? John
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Methelyne chloride.
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
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John Siegel wrote:
<snip>

Try a search for "IPS Weld-On #3"
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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Nova wrote:

Thanks Search found a few more sources than what I had searched on. And a more reasonable shipping charge. .
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If it's quarter inch or more, cut on a table saw with carbide tipped blade. (you can probably use a blade that isn't carbide tipped, but I always got cleaner cuts, I don't recall how many teeth I used around 60 I think.
Scoring and breaking is an option, but I've never tried it.
Not sure why you would flip the blade around either. Unless this is for less than 1/4" plexi.
One note, leave the plastic protector on until you are completely done working with it. Helps to prevent scratches.
wrote:

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The reversed blade. Often recommended, never works.

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I use a table saw with a fine toothed blade and slow careful feed. Make sure the edge where the cut is going to be is flat with the saw top so the saw top can support the Plexiglas where it is being cut. leaving the protective film on until finished is a very good idea or protect with tape and use tape to reinforce where you are cutting(cut through the tape both sides).

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Need a clear edge with plexiglas? Try heating the edge carefully.......you don't want to scorch it. Either a torch or heat gun will do the trick. Get it smooth as you can with your tools, get all splinters off of it and heat it. With a little practice it will look as clear as the plexiglas ends and fronts on the refrigerated cases in the grocery store. :-) Hold your heat away from the sheet and sneak up on it till it clears up, then get the heat away before the plastic bubbles. Good luck Lyndell

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SWDeveloper wrote:

There are plenty of $4 versions for occasional work out there but if you score long lines with thicker material you should consider one with a real handle. I have an old version of the Fletcher model (#5120?) with replaceable blades - more like $25 it think. Same company that makes glass cutters, point drivers and the like for real matting and window work. I've had the thing for over 25 years and it is still fine (no association). http://www.fletcher-terry.com
Also, put your straight edge on the side you want to keep until you get a decent score line. Go over it many times increasing the depth just a bit at a time. It should make a sort of squeaking sound and roll off a bit of the material. This is not like glass where you just scratch it, it needs some depth or it will not follow the line when you snap it.
- S
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wrote:

I've had good results with a circular saw and a blade meant for cutting plastics. You also need a straight edge to guide the saw -- I use the edge of a piece of 1/4" plywood, and clamp it to the piece I'm cutting.
Mark
p.s. here is the blade I use: http://www.doityourself.com/invt/6528574
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