please check syntax error (grammar mistakes) for me

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English is a little trouble for me .so ,there are maybe some errors in my writting. so I hope someone who is kind help me check the syntax error (grammar mistakes) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Different microstructures and mechanical properties can be developed in a variety of annealing temperature. An investigation was undertaken to examine effect of annealing temperature on microstructure and mechanical of dual phase steel under simulated hot-dipped galvanizing. The steel (of composition 0.15wt%C 0.1wt%Si 1.7wt%Mn) was obtained at three different heating temperatures (790℃, 820℃, 850℃) by continuous annealing experiment thermal simulator. The microstructures were observed by the optical microscope and transmission electron microscopy, and the mechanical properties were tested. Under hot-dip galvanizing condition, the effect of annealing temperature on microstructure and the relationship of microstructure and mechanical properties have been investigated. Increasing the annealing temperature, martensite volume fraction increases, and intergranular carbide reduces and ferrite intragranular carbide becomes small. When the annealing temperature is 790℃, most of martensite distributes intergranular region. Increasing the annealing temperature, intragranular island martensite increases. When the annealing temperature reaches 820℃,twin martensite appears in the room temperature microstructure. The influence of annealing temperature on the flow curve is significant. When the annealing temperature is 790℃, there is obvious yield point elongation. When the annealing temperature is 820℃, yield point elongation disappears. At the same time, tensile strength fluctuates with the annealing temperature changes.
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I have corrected the document foor you. Here it is in proper English ------------------
When it comes to purchasing products with the label "Made in China", Caveat Emptor--let the buyer beware. Generally, consumers equate these three words with cheap and shoddy products. Now, “Made In China” also spells “Danger”.
The list of defective Chinese goods is long, from pet food containing melamine to toothpaste tainted with antifreeze, Five types of imported seafood were found to be laced with chemicals and, although no fatalities or illnesses have been reported in the U.S. yet, Chinese counterfeit glycerin found in cough syrup has been linked to more than 100 deaths in Panama.
In the wake of the US stepping up testing of Chinese products, the Chinese government reports that it closed 180 food plants and discovered 23,000 safety violations. Most disturbing is the amount of defective Chinese goods that have slipped through US investigators’ safety nets.
The Regulators In 2003, leaders in China formed the State Food and Drug Administration but the agency was riddled with problems, from weak investigative procedures to corrupt officials. First director Zheng Xiaoyu was convicted of taking bribes from domestic pharmaceutical companies to approve untested medicine and was later executed.
The FDA in the United States also has its problems. Lack of funding and competition with 11 other federal regulatory agencies make it almost impossible to police our food supply.
Food China has recently risen to be one of the world’s top agricultural exporters: in just four years, from 2002 to 2006, FDA-regulated foods imported from China more than doubled and experts predict the number to triple by the end of 2007.
Chinese foods are pervasive in most American kitchens; from additives such as xanthum gum (used as a thickener in dairy products, salad dressings and most frozen foods including ice cream) to preservatives such as ascorbic acid (Vitamin C). Most breakfast cereals are made in China.
Companies such as Kellog and General Mills are just now beginning to test additives such as wheat in their products. (Menu Foods pet recall found melamine in wheat gluten?a discovery that sounded the alarm bells to potential dangers in human food supply.) Recently, Veggie Booty was recalled after an outbreak of salmonella was traced back to the snack food. According to the US maker, salmonella was found in a spice imported from China that was used to season the snack food.
Toys China produces 80 percent of the world’s toys, some of which contain lead paint. Soon after Target recalled about 200,000 Kool Toyz action figures because of sharp edges and lead contamination, Toys “R” Us discovered that the same Chinese company that manufactured those toys also made the Elite Operations figures in its stores. More recently, Mattel Inc., the world’s largest toymaker, recalled 1.5 million China-made Sesame Street, Dora the Explorer and other children’s products as they might contain “excessive levels” of lead. Eighty-one other types of Fisher-Price branded toys sold in US stores since May 2007 are included in the massive recall.
And lead paint isn’t restricted to toys: The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission recalled children’s jewelry from China that potentially could cause lead poisoning.
Tires In June 2007, the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration ordered a recall of 450,000 defective radial tires for pickup trucks, sport utility vehicles and vans. A New Jersey importer notified officials that its Chinese manufacturer had stopped including gum strips, a safety feature that holds the tire together and prevents it from separating.
(Tread separation led to the recall of millions of Firestone tires in 2000; this particular tire failure was linked to an increased risk of rollover of light trucks and SUV's.)
The faulty tires are believed to have caused a car accident in Pennsylvania in August of 2006 that killed two people. A lawsuit filed by the families alleges the accident happened because the tire lacked the gum strip. The lawsuit alleges the Chinese company removed the critical gum strip after the initial test tires were manufactured. Consumer advocates said this case exposes significant loopholes in the system that regulates products in the United States.
Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) has called for a full investigation into the importation of the defective tires.
The New Jersey tire importer sued the manufacturer of the tires, Hangzhou Zhongce Rubber, in a New Jersey court. The Hague Convention is a policy which allows foreign corporations to be sued in different countries. Tire manufacturer Hangzhou Zhongce Rubber has been served under the Hague convention.
Other Lawsuits As well, a number of lawsuits have been filed against importers of Chinese products. Menu Foods, the Ontario pet food maker whose Chinese-sourced product contained melamine, faces more than 100 class action lawsuits. A proposed class action has been filed against the distributor of various Thomas & Friends? wooden railway toys.
As long as companies continue to import Chinese goods, it is inevitable that more class actions will be filed.
Chinese Defective Products Articles China Recall: Kids II Play Blocks with Excessive Lead Paint It is a well known fact that kids will put things in their mouths - that's what kids do. And to think that our kids are putting defective products into their mouths, and toys containing lead paint, is cause for certain alarm. Once again, news that toys made in China are being recalled for a lead paint hazard. This time, Kids II is recalling Baby Einstein Color Blocks due to excessive levels of lead paint.
China Recall: KB Toys with Excessive Lead Paint In spite of efforts by Chinese authorities, and importers of Chinese products to keep a watchful eye for the presence of defective products, the parade of defective products just keeps on coming.
Today’s Recall from China: The Kolcraft Play Yard The Runaway Recall Train Pulls in from China Yet Again: More Recalled Toys Tainted Toys for Tots: It’s All About Cutting Corners Defective Tires: We must send a message to China Chinese Defective Products: Deadly Consequences both in the US and China
Chinese Defective Products in the News AUG-30-07: The CPSC, in cooperation with Toys "R" Us Inc., announced a voluntary recall of about 27,000 Imaginarium Wooden Coloring Cases. The printed ink on the outer packaging of the wood case contains lead. Also, some of the black watercolor paint contains excessive levels of lead, which violates the federal lead paint standard. The recall involves the Imaginarium brand 213 Piece Wooden Coloring Case which includes crayons, pastels, colored pencils, fiber pens, paintbrush, pencil, water colors, palette, white paint, ruler and pencil sharpener in a light tan wooden carrying case. They were sold by Toys "R" Us stores nationwide and toysrus.com from October 2006 through August 2007. [CPSC: TOYS R US LEAD]
AUG-21-07: Wal-Mart Stores Inc. quietly stopped selling two brands of dog treats in July, after customers voiced concerns that the Chinese products may have caused their pets to fall ill, but no recall has been announced. The world's largest retailer started pulling Chicken Jerky Strips from Import-Pingyang Pet Product Co. and Chicken Jerky from Shanghai Bestro Trading on July 26. Wal-Mart also placed a computerized block on all cash registers to prevent workers from selling the products. Wal-Mart's action follows a massive pet food recall in March, when retailers began pulling products made in China that included the chemical melamine ? a contaminant that's a byproduct of several pesticides. Philadelphia television station WPVI reported last week that a woman claimed her 2-year-old Chihuahua died after eating Bestro Chicken Jerky Strips. The station reported that an autopsy found the dog died of an infection caused by toxic bacteria. [FOX NEWS: WALMART DOG TREATS]
AUG-19-07: Chinese-made products including toothpaste, seafood and pet food have caused controversy about how safe they are. [COURIER-JOURNAL: CHINESE DEFECTIVE PRODUCT]
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Here is someone who obviously is trying to learn and improve their English, and all you do is dredge up some stuff that is irrelavant. My opinion of you is less than Stupendous.
Dan
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Likewise.
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Just a quick question: How is metallurgy relevant to a lap steel newsgroup, other than possibly in the resonant qualities of the bridge/tailpiece or the steel bar itself? Why ask about tech-note grammar HERE?
As for China as a nation, many U.S. manufacturing jobs were eliminated here and sent to China by greedy corporations whose only interest was in putting more money in their own pockets. It left many Americans either jobless or working for less pay at Walmart selling the very goods they used to make. Forgive the sour grapes, but I don't feel the need to like the current situation. Also, if some Chinese goods are shoddy or dangerous, that's kind of an important point. If you disagree, give YOUR child a Thomas the Tank Engine to suck on. Oh, and, please note that if the original post is truly from China, there's an excellent chance that this thread is being monitored. Think about that.---->JMS
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wrote:

Isnt the job of corporations to make money, for both the stockholders and managment?
When your competitor off shores his work, and then undercuts your prices, you have two choices. 1. Offshore your manufacturing 2. Have a big auction and go out of business.
Do you see a viable 3rd alternative?
Gunner
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Gunner wrote:

Convince your customers that despite the higher price your product is better value.
Seems to be working for Sears with hand tools. Look closely and you'll see their Craftsman (but not necessarily Companion or non-Sears-brand) wrenches, sockets, etc marked "made in USA" in the metal. You can get what seems to be equal quality from Harbor Freight for much less money but Sears seems to still do a good business in them.
The longies I'm wearing right now are made of Polartec, from Malden Mills, in MA. Sewn in Qatar or some such but the fabric is American made. I've had cheaper ones--the Polartec is warmer. I don't know what magic Malden does to it, but they do _something_. Chinese fleece just isn't the same.
--
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--John
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On Sat, 22 Dec 2007 14:36:38 -0500, "J. Clarke"

Then you vastly limit your market to those that dont mind paying a higer price for goods.

Been watching the threads on Sears bashing for selling shitty tools?

So you are wearing Outsorced stuff and bragging about it.
Bit hypocritical, ne?
Gunner

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I have not seen people bashing Harbor Freight wrenches. They seem to work as advertised.
Aside from that...
With the falling dollar, I now find that a lot of US made stuff is finally acceptably priced. For example, just 2 days ago I bought a USA made convertible hand truck for $100 from McMaster.
A Harbor Freight hand truck of similar construction is $49. I went to HF and compared them. There are many minor differences and the US version of it is much stronger. (material thickness, casters etc)
i
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I have a question about cost of wrenches. I thought that making wrenches is automated. There is not much labor cost in wrenches. They are stamped, forged, polished etc, and that all seems to be a fully automatable process with no need for much human input. Hence labor cost is not a big consideration. Am I mistaken?
i
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Still lots of people needed. Technicians to monitor those machines and adjust tolerances to a specific criteria. Engineers for quality control, to design new products, build or modify the those automatic machines, packagers, shippers, delivery, and dozens of other areas I haven't mentioned. Agreed, automation has eliminated a good deal of the employee roster, but it brings it's own specific need when it comes to human involvement. The biggest difference between now and fifty years ago is that many of the skills have changed, but not all of them.
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"Things are more like they are now than they've ever been before"
-Dwight D. Esenhower
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On Sun, 23 Dec 2007 00:15:20 -0600, Ignoramus9551

The cost of those automated machines is reflected in the cost of the tool. As others have mentioned there are a lot of poeple still involved in the manufacture of the tools - not everything is automated. Visions of a button pusher reclining in a Lazy-boy reading (looking at) nudie books are right out of a 1950's expo.
Pete
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On Sun, 23 Dec 2007 00:13:37 -0600, Ignoramus9551

I look at Harbor Freight stuff as "good for light duty use only." The HF hand truck is fine if you're going to use it as 'raw materials' get out the welder and turn it into a mobile wire dispensing rack. Or use it semi-permanently for moving items at a remote location where it won't be getting hammered daily - cheap enough to leave on site, and it's there when you need it.
(Bought a $15 on sale HF hand truck for making a wire rack. Dad doesn't understand the subtleties - he saw it, grabbed it, and overloaded it with something the other commercial duty trucks we have around the house can take in stride... It now has a nice set of US made wheels that he bought after the plastic hubs broke right out.)
Or for the back of an open truck where if they cut the small chain and steal it you won't shed a tear. The chain cost more...
I would be VERY leery of buying mission-critical safety gear there, like a chain-fall hoist that would be used with personnel near or under the load - or as the load. You suck it up and pay the extra for a CM that is designed and certified for the duty. The right safety gear may be expensive, but it's still far cheaper than a funeral.
--<< Bruce >>--
PS: By the way, how did we get here from 'Please check syntax error...'?
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as a man on the earth, I'm sorry for some misfortunes caused by some "Made in China". every consumer including me abhors shoddy products. so what we can do is that never consume shoddy proucts whether it "Made in China" or "Made in Moon"
AS a man in the street, I'm glad to know various comments about China which come from the rest of world. Let me know what they are thinking about China.
as a chinese ,I'm working hard to change : what i can change.
At last i hope China bring chance and benefit instead of harm to you, to me, to the world.
by the way, Merry Christmas to everyone be carefule when you consume whether it "Made in China" or "Made in Moon"
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Really? Which of my specific points do you feel I am either wrong, or insincere about?
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Yes. We give you specs, and you substitute lead paint where it's not specified, lead paint where it's not specified, and toxins in the pet food to boost the apparent protein count in the wheat gluten - except that it kills the pets. Oh, and the antifreeze in the toothpaste, that was a nice touch.

Bullshit. That crap isn't supposed to be in the products in the first place. And yet China-apologists like you will deflect the blame from anyone but the ones making the intentional decision to put substances in the products which are known to be harmful and illegal.

A Chinese manufacturer deviated from the spec given to them. YES, hell yes, I think the importer should be held liable for the toxic products. If you had gone to productrecallwatch.com and read any of the commentary I've written there, you'd find that blisteringly clear. BUT, if China wasn't putting the crap into the products in the first place, we wouldn't have this problem, would we. They share blame, but the only ones we can directly do anything about are the importers.

And who do you pretend it is? Every retailer that sells it? No. The corner store should not be burdoned with testing products. The importers? Somewhat. They bring it in to the country, and should be responsible to make sure it works and is safe. The manufacturers? Absolutely.

Oh, disagreement and disrespect of someone who is defending a country who is actively trying to kill my kids and pets is somehow trolling or idiocy now? I see. You have a unique perspective.

I intend to. What does that have to do with toxic Chinese imports, exactly?
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Dave Hinz wrote:

You gave me nothing. I don't manufacture the stuff, and I don't import it. Take me out of this equation.

I don't know where you get the idea that I'm a China-apologist. I haven't taken them off the hook whatsoever. What I have said is own up to your responsibility. Retailers like Mattel knew damned well they were using manufacturing companies that would cut corners if they could. And they did.

So can the retailers, but I agree. It belongs more in the lap of the importers.

Now you're just being petty. You know as well as I do I'm not talking about corner stores.
The

No, my perspective is just different from yours. My suspicion is that anyone who has that has a "unique" perspective to you

One trick pony, aren't you?
--
Tanus

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And yet, you inject yourself INTO the equation as an apologist for the criminals in question. Your choice, not mine. You want to defend them, you take the criticism of them.

They're given a spec. They arbitrarily decide to deviate from the spec and use something cheaper and toxic. And then YOU defend them.

Prove it. And prosecute Mattel.

And yet you defend those who substitute safe chemicals for poison. Interseting.

Do I? Let's be specific. The manufacturer is ultimately responsible. But, they're in a different country with a suspect (to say the least) legal and political system. So in the US, our only realistic recourse is to punish the importers. This doesn't change the fact that China continues to exploit the ill-advised "most favored trade nation" status. Lets revoke that until they earn our trust.

Lets see. So you want to defend China for shipping toxic products to us. Why, exactly, have you chosen this specific cause as yours?

It's called "sticking to the topic of the post". You should try it. Answer the question.
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<snip>

Usenet has quite a few users who twist and turn people's words, and never back down. You're one of them. I'm not one to argue repeatedly about what I didn't say. I state it once, and if the accusation comes back to me, I just move on. Which is what I"m doing now. See ya.
However, something to consider is that you don't win an argument by re-hashing drivel. You just piss other people off who might otherwise have given you credence.
--
Tanus

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