Plans for bench

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Hi all
I just moved into a new house and the basement is basically a blank slate. I would like to make a bench approx 6ft long for working on and miscellaneous things. I am not a carpenter by any stretch of the imagination, so I am wondering if anyone has any plans for a very basic work bench for a beginner carpenter. Thanks for any input.
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Hi all
I just moved into a new house and the basement is basically a blank slate. I would like to make a bench approx 6ft long for working on and miscellaneous things. I am not a carpenter by any stretch of the imagination, so I am wondering if anyone has any plans for a very basic work bench for a beginner carpenter. Thanks for any input.
Jon, Here is a link (thanks to JOAT) I found while looking at JOAT's post on a gun cabinet. HTH Big John
http://www.popularmechanics.com/home_improvement/furniture/1302961.html
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Yeah right, if he wants a classic woodworkers bench and the complexities of building one... he's "new".
--
Alex - newbie_neander in woodworking
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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AAvK wrote:

Alex - I was only trying to help him out with plans that he requested. The same link has a more modest bench that might make you both happy. http://www.popularmechanics.com/home_improvement/furniture/1273396.html
Something real simple would be a solid core door on a set of sawhorses. HTH Big John
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This is a multi-part message in MIME format. --------------070703050606000002090809 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
The link was very helpful for me. Thanks.
Art
Big John wrote:

--------------070703050606000002090809 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1"> <title></title> </head> <body text="#000000" bgcolor="#ffffff"> The link was very helpful for me.&nbsp; Thanks.<br> <br> Art<br> <br> <br> <br> Big John wrote:<br> <blockquote type="cite" cite=" snipped-for-privacy@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com"> <pre wrap="">AAvK wrote: </pre> <blockquote type="cite"> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">Jon, Here is a link (thanks to JOAT) I found while looking at JOAT's post on a gun cabinet. HTH Big John
<a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.popularmechanics.com/home_improvement/furniture/1302961.html ">http://www.popularmechanics.com/home_improvement/furniture/1302961.html </a>
</pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap="">Yeah right, if he wants a classic woodworkers bench and the complexities of building one... he's "new".
-- Alex - newbie_neander in woodworking cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com not my site: <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.e-sword.net /">http://www.e-sword.net /</a> </pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!----> Alex - I was only trying to help him out with plans that he requested. The same link has a more modest bench that might make you both happy. <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.popularmechanics.com/home_improvement/furniture/1273396.html ">http://www.popularmechanics.com/home_improvement/furniture/1273396.html </a>
Something real simple would be a solid core door on a set of sawhorses. HTH Big John
</pre> </blockquote> </body> </html>
--------------070703050606000002090809--
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The link was very helpful for me. Thanks. Art
Actually that is a damn nice plan for free, so, last night I made it into a total word.doc. Did some Photoshop work and put everything in the right place.
--
Alex - newbie_neander in woodworking
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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Thanks, appreciate it.

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bench or modifying my current set-up. I'm a sculptor who has a very modest wood working set-up (Foredom flexible shaft, reciprocating power carver, various dremels, cheesy no-name 9" bandsaw, dust collector, palm sander, drill, lots of files, rifflers and handsaws) to build bases & armatures, carve details and sand. My "bench" is a big, ugly but solid dresser with the top at 34" tall.
I'm curious about the typical height of workbenches and the whole ergonomics of woodworking. I find that I tend to hunch over my work and as a result get sore at the base of my neck/shoulders. It worse with sanding as it's my least favorite activity and I tend to bear down to get it over with as soon as possible. I'm toying with getting a dremel detail sander and/or a drill press with a sanding drum to see if that would help. My other thought is to possibly raise the work surface so that it's higher (perhaps make long bench with one part taller than normal?). I've noticed that I never get neck/shoulder pain when using my bandsaw. I think it's because the work surface there is higher and I'm able to look closely at my work without hunkering over so much.
Does anyone else get neck/upper back pain from wood working? Any suggestions for optimal working ergonomics?
Chris
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wrote:

No - I just don't believe there is such a thing. It's all too dependent on what you're doing, and how you do it. Go with what's comfortable for you.
My main bench is 36", which is "too tall" by the usual rules. I find it perfect for plaing and chisel work, whether standing or sitting (which I do a lot, for close work). I can also saw on this bench because I use Japanese saws, but I find it unusably high for Western saws.
My cabinet saw, planer and second bench are all 33", which is about the standard. I always found this bench too low - one reason for building its successor.
The router table is 31", for convenient manufacture, and should maybe be 33" instead.
My assembly table is 27". This is definitely too low to work on, but it's useful when there's a piece on top of it and I'm not trying to peer over the top. For big pieces I might even put a pallet on the floor with a sheet of plywood and a blanket.
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I'd expect that unless you're especially tall in the upper body, sitting at a 36" bench would be pretty close to eye level. That seems kind of awkward to me. It's fine for seeing, but holding hands up to do everything at eye level would get tiring extremely fast. I should know because I'm sitting all the time.
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Upscale wrote:

I'm about average height for this group, 6'4", and when I sit my eys level is 47". 36" sounds like a reasonable benchtop height, especially since anything I put on it will end up being around 40" or so. YMMV
Dave in Fairfax
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But there is such a thing and that is why he is asking.
There is no one optimal "one height fits all", but there surely is an optimal ergonomical height for everyone. The question is how do you determine what that height is. Should be bench be x inches below the elbow? Should it be x inches above the waist? Should the top overhand the support by 6" or should it be flush? If hand planing a board, what height do you like it in relationship to bending your back? What happens if it is too high or two low?
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

The OP definitely needs to read "The Workbench Book". The fitting of bench to person is discussed fairly thoroughly as well as how it relates to hand vs power tool use on the bench. rule of thumb is the height of your palm held parallel to the ground at your side. I personally find that way too low. I like a bench that is just under elbow high.
Dave in Fairfax
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My bench is 35" or about 3" higher than the palm Why 35"? Because that is an inch below the router table next to it. When routing a piece it will go over and not hit the bench.
It is an OK height. A few times I wish it was lower for assembly type work, a few times I wished it higher for the same reason. For planing, it is about right for me at 5'10"
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Had the same problem with 3 wheel bandsaw I used to have until it was put onto a 12" box raising it for better visibility. Have read recommendations that height of folder elbow is ideal for work surface.
wrote:

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wrote:

One of the woodworking mags a while back showed basically a mini workbench that you could clamp to the top of the bench to raise it up. My neck bothers me when using chisels on my bench for extended periods, so I've been thinking about doing this. The problem with actually building a raised portion into the bench is sometimes you'll work on things that are bigger than the bench and it'll be in the way. Getting the entire bench to raised up easily and yet still be sturdy enough would be a challenge.
-Leuf
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wrote:

I'd ratherhave a tall bench, then stand on a box to lower it if I need to. My feet ar emuch better at balancing than a sub-benchtop.
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wrote:

Try an ROS instead of a palm sander, it actually is a bit faster- and bearing down doesn't seem to help much. You might be able to cut some of your pain down a little by just letting the weight of the sander do the work.

I like to get the area where I'm working right at or a little above elbow height, keeps me from slumping, and works pretty well for me. Good light helps, too- that way you're not bending over and squinting to see what you're doing.
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Having built a bench for my workshop the main thing to do is make it out of and 8 x 4 sheet of block board but the most important thing is to have it on casters so it can be moved around the shop Put 4 locking caster on each end and two freewheeling ones in the middle for different tasks and i would also make it the same height as your table saw come in very handy when loading 8 x 4 sheets in to be cut down cheers connor
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I replaced the pad of the PC333 ROS shortly after buying it because I applied pressure while sanding, mistake. Heat melts the loops on a Velcro pad.
On Sun, 24 Jul 2005 07:54:56 -0500, Prometheus

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