plans for acoustic computer enclosure?

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On 10/01/2009 07:06 PM, Christopher Glaeser wrote:

The way I interpret that video is that the air intakes are at the bottom and top but near the front. (They advertise "front to back airflow" in the text".) The exit is at the back.
For a tower enclosure I'd just do intake at the front and exit at the back, but with zigzag passages lined with sound absorber panels. If you've got carpet it may be beneficial to orient the openings facing downwards to get a bit more muffling effect. You probably want the enclosure to fit fairly snugly around the side of the tower to avoid warm exhaust mixing with the incoming cool air.
Chris
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Chris Friesen wrote:

Consider that the Kell cabinets are not intended to render a machine recording-studio quiet, they are intended to reduce a racket of servers to a tolerable rack.
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Yeah, I watched it again and I think you are right. It's interesting that all the wiring in the back is sealed within soft foam panels. Originally I had assumed that was to reduce noise, but now I'm guessing the major reason is to ensure air flow comes from the front, as you point out.

Yes, I should probably do that for a desktop as well.

I was thinking either carpet with a non-straight patter as you suggest, or posssibly using the egg crate foam used in sound studios that directs the sound waves into the foam channels.

At first I was thinking I could rely on an air exchange at the back, but I think you're right, I should design something that puts the incoming air at the front of the equipment, perhaps using a false bottom or false side to redirect the air flow so there is no straight line path from the inside to the outside of the acoustic enclosure.
Best, Christopher
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Since this is taking the course it is, I will throw this out. It's a friggen box. How hard is it to make a box?

Since this is taking the course it is, I will throw this out. It's a friggen box. How hard is it to make a box?
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It is easy to make a box. But to make it so it absorbs sound and still allow sufficient cooling/air flow at the same time is a bit more difficult.
I have installed those anechoic wedge foam blocks in recording studios before. It is expensive but works well. You would have to make sure the air still got through though.
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If the only requirement was a box, sure, the project would be trivial with not much planning needed. However, a major design objective is to significantly reduce noise while providing adequate air flow, which requires a bit more thought and planning.
Best, Christopher
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If it helps you any, I built a padded box around my portable compress to stifle the noise when I use it in my apartment. It's a simple 3/4" plywood box, four rubber wheeled casters and lined with furnace air intake filters. It reduces the noise over 50%. Air intake is sufficient by the use of an interior 120v fan and the air to it is supplied through several layers of speaker grill cloth. If it does that well on an 85 decibel compressor, it should be sufficient for a computer box.
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wrote:

USB cable brings keayboard,mouse,video and audio (in and out) into the "studio" leaving all drive and fan noise outside.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

USB can't handle multi track audio.
He can do the same with Firewire, but I assume he can't have them in another room or he'd never had posted this in the first place.
--

-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

Googling "USB multitrack audio" reveals a number of products. Do they not work well?

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J. Clarke wrote:

I guess it depends on your working definition of "multitrack" is. :-)
I mean, stereo is multitrack, right? And yes, there are USB interfaces that will handle stereo fine, or let's say vocal mic and and acoustic guitar. Maybe even 4 channels.
But most people who are using a digital audio workstation, like Protools for example, and are concerned with noise enough to spend the money to build a box to hide it, are likely doing real multitrack recording, as in entire bands or drums. We're talking a minimum 10 tracks just for drums, and a minimum 24 for a band.
--

-MIKE-

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wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

In where? The snake/cables run to the board, in and out of a rack of pre-amps and processors, then into the interface, or they run straight to the interface and the mixing/level setting is done with software (or some combination like that), then to the computer. The only thing making noise, besides the band :-), is the computer.
--

-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

I'm seeing devices with 20 channels.
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J. Clarke wrote:

A link would help me talk apple/apples with you. Some of those things are probably mixers that will send and receive a couple of track each with the computer, but everything else is either on-board recording, or just an analogue mixer, sending a stereo bus to the PC.
But I may be wrong. The most I've seen is 8 channels, but I wouldn't trust it for anything I care about.
I can tell you this... I could ask 500 Nashville producers/engineers how many of them use or would ever consider using USB over Firewire for anything other than recording quick little scratch demo tracks, and my junior high school shop teacher could count the number on one hand. :-)
It just was never meant for that purpose, while Firewire.... was, specifically.
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wrote:

computer console connection. Keep the noisy computer OUT of the studio. All you want inside is your instruments and your controls. Nothing with a fan. Nothing with a motor. Nothing with an escapement. They all make "noise" that is not meant to be part of your "music". I don't know what kind of music you play/record - and some people might call "it" noise -
But whatever is NOT supposed to be part of YOUR music is noise. Keeping it out of the studio is easier than keeping it out of the recording.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

We understand all that. I was just pointing out, as a side note, that it's Firewire and not USB, and that sort of took on a life of its own.
However, my point is still valid that I assume, for whatever reason, he can't have them in another room or he'd never had posted this in the first place.
--

-MIKE-

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

A computer used for actual recording of music in a professional recording studio is rarely anywhere but in a "control room", or in close proximity thereto, and very little "recording" is done in a control room in a professional environment. Therefore it is extremely rare for the noise generated by the computer itself to end up on the "music".
The perceived problem is that computer(s) generate noise that canl possibly interfere with the critical listening necessary to either recording, or mixing.
I say "perceived" and "possible", because, IME in 30 years of professional studio work, it is rarely a problem, and, considering most recording is done at an SPL of 60 to 80 db, and mixing an average of 90-105 db, then only a problem for those who delight in making a mountain out of a molehill, of which this discussion is plainly guilty.
IOW, as in the "audiophile" business, the perceived problem is largely an opportunity sell something expensive to the "perceiver".
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wrote:

The difference being, lots of music is recorded in home studios and often by one person doing the whole thing. If you have a professional studio, then you'll have a separate sound room and control room (and the personnel to run the equipment). A well built and maintained computer is not going to be a problem. If you are in a typical home studio (very often a spare bedroom or similar), the computer *can* be an issue. In a home studio environment, building (or buying) a box to enclose the computer is more cost effective than building a control room.
And, to touch on another point (which I snipped), if all your recording is done at levels between 60 and 80 db, I'd suggest you go look up dynamics. I guess if all you are recording is punk rock (or another genre that is all on or all off), computer noise won't be a problem... or might even be desirable.
My kids have a saying... "don't yuck my yum". They use it at meals to say, if it's what I like, don't say how awful it is or how stupid I am for liking it. The same could apply to this.
Ed
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Ed Edelenbos wrote:

What part of "professional" did you not understand in the above?
If you have a professional

Gee .. thanks for that highly informative information.

I guess if all you are recording is punk rock (or another

LOL ... so you conveniently snipped a part so that you could insert a figment of your imagination?
I came NO where near saying at what SPL "my" recordings are done at ... it's a trade secret. :)

My kids learned to say if you have NO experience in what you're talking about (in this case the world of professional recording), say nothing ... which applies particularly to your reply.
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