Planing rough sawn lumber flat.


I googled my house and cannot find the article that I read about using a planer to flatten a rough sawn board. A simple sled was built to carry the wood through to produce 1 flat side. Has anyone else seen the article? If so do you know what magazine and issue? The article was in the last 3 or 4 issues IIRC. Or did I read it on line?
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Did you see it on TV? If memory serves (which it often does NOT) I caught a clip on the DIY network where a long flat melamine board carried the cupped board held with wedges to prevent rocking while passing through the planer. He was flattening some pretty long boards as I recall. Perhaps you can search DIYNET. Please post it to the rec if you find it.. David
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I am beginning to think that I dreamed it up but yes I think you are describing the one I saw. The wedges under the high spots held the board from twisting or flattening out.
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On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 14:36:49 GMT, "Leon"

I remember seeing it but don't remember where. Simple concept, really. It was a sled of melamine with a stop block attached across the trailing end to prevent kickback of the board being surfaced. Insert shims where there are gaps between the board and the sled to prevent the board from being pressed flat by the planer rollers.
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wrote:

Are the rollers really that powerful that it will press flat the cup on 3/4" inch thick lumber? If it does partially flatten the wood wouldn't a few passes at the same setting take care of the flattening?
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In an ideal world the wood would be flat to start with. In a slightly better world the wood would only be cupped and you could plane that out. In this world however the boards are often cupped and twisted. The planer will not take out a twist with out a special set up.
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Yes I believe that is the one I am thinking of. I forget what keeps the shims in place.
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Bungee cords.
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On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 11:28:44 -0600, Chuck Taylor

IIRC the technique calls for hot gluing the shims into place so that they don't vibrate out of position and the workpiece is held reasonably tightly to the sled.
I can see the magazine in my mind's eye but the seam of my bifocals must be blocking the name of the mag ;-)
I used a similar technique to rip a seriously twisted piece of Cherry on my TS. I used a sacrificial piece of plywood in this case and screwed the plywood through the shims into the workpiece. The twist was too severe to simply plane - I had to rip into two pieces so I wouldn't lose as much thickness flattening it. Worked just fine. Pics are available if you're interested.
TWS
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On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 11:28:44 -0600, Chuck Taylor

Discussed here a while back. Do the wedges[ back board not needed] AND also tack here and there along the length, both sides with a hot-glue gun. The glue is easily removed without damaging the board. I tried it after seeing it here, and it worked great. 3/4" MDF instead of melamine works real fine. Do one side, then it is flat to do the other after being removed from the MDF. Take some care balancing the wedged wood so as to remove the least amount.
Consider also hot-gluing a narrow piece of MDF [or several, with care] to the top on the fence side when edge-cutting on the TS as a guide for the first cut.
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Chuck Taylor wrote:

Have been doing something similar for years, although I have used two pieces of MDF glued together as the carrier. Maybe a bit of overkill, and definitely heavy, but it has worked well for me. I put the stop block at the front edge since the rollers are pushing the work forward, and have never had a problem.
When I have shimed up the board, I hit each of the shims with the hot melt glue gun and give it a couple of minits to dry. When the top side comes out of the planer with no rough surface, I remove it from the carrier, clean a bit of the dried glue off the shims and on to the next one. Over the years the top of the carrier has got a little scarred from where the glue held too tight, but hasn't affected the effectiveness that I can see.
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Posted this before-- but : I don't plane anything any longer than I need to. I use a 3/4" plywood sled & use hot glue AS the wedges. The glue will stabilize the wood and stick it to the sled. Once one side is flat, I use a chisel to remove all the glue from the sled & board and flatten the other side. The only problem I've had is with reactive wood (branch wood) bowing after it was planed. Hope this helps Phil
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Here's the link to the FWW QT video:
http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/pages/wvt095.asp
Here's the link to the Wreck thread:
http://groups.google.com/group/rec.woodworking/browse_frm/thread/d150e542b84cc474/6c9903ee9b9360f7?lnk=st&q=fine+woodworking+author%3Ahylourgos&rnum=6&hl=en#6c9903ee9b9360f7
Cheers, H
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It was in FWW mag a few months ago. I'll try to find it when I get home. The guy used a portable hand power planer to rough surface a large slab. Then he finished it with a belt sander and the ROS. Dave
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That is another one. The one I saw had a sled and wedges to hold the twisted board so that it would not twist or bend as it went through the planer.
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On Mon, 12 Dec 2005 19:38:06 GMT, "Leon"

FWW #145 pp 88-93 had an article titled, "From Rough to Ready" that included a description of a sled. But I don't think this is the one you're thinking of. There may have been a "Methods of Work" piece too, but their online indexing sucks.
I (think) I recall seeing it and I only subscribe to FWW, so that's my guess.

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And I do not subscribe to FWW. I may have seen the on line video at FWW.
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Oops, looks like the FWW link I just put up no longer works (they take them down after 6 months).
I think I have a copy of this at home, I can e-mail it to you if tell me your e-mail address.
H
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I would very much appreciate that.
lcb11211atswbell.net substitute @ for at
THANK YOU
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wrote:

Was it Fine Woodworking July/August 2004 pp 20? It was in "Methods of Work" and titled "Face-jointing boards in the planer".
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