Planer with Painted wood

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How much damage would it be to the electric planer blades getting the paint off 4/4's? I would like to shave it down to 3/4's trying to use the original wood. Or would it be better to shave off the clean side and install it with the clean side out?
TIA
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On Sat, 8 Sep 2007 15:53:11 -0400, "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote:>How much damage would it be to the electric planer blades getting the paint

What kind of paint? Lead may be present.
Personally, if I was relatively sure no lead paint was present, I would probably strip the paint with a belt sander, then plane it.
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I believe it may have lead. I took off the moldings and smelled lead.

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On Sat, 8 Sep 2007 16:05:54 -0400, "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote:>I believe it may have lead. I took off the moldings and smelled lead.

What does lead paint smell like?
Pete
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Like Lead. It has a sweetesh metal smell/taste, if you can smell/taste it you have a real problem case.

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I cant explain the smell but I do notice it when the paint chips come off. I rather not taste it.

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For me it's both a smell/taste thing at the same time. I agree it's hard to explain, you get the same sensation when you melt lead. Hard to explain but unforgettable. "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote in message

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"noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote in message

A lot of paint contains solids that will literally eat the knives of a planer... I'd plane the unpainted side and hide the painted side.
John
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Thanx, that I can do since the painted side wont be seen at all.

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John Grossbohlin wrote:

I'm not doubting you because I don't know but what could be in paint that would damage steel knives? Not the oil...not the resin...titanium dioxide?
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Silica (basically sand) calcium carbonate, talc, and kaolin gives paint it's body and durability these days. The silica in particular acts as an abrasive and wears jointer and planer knives quickly and the other fillers aren't much kinder.
The last time I tried to run painted wood through my jointer will be the last time. I thought I could get away with jointing the edges of a pre-primed board that had been ripped on the table saw. Wrong... I ended up with two grooves worn in the knives that left humps in the surface of the boards run over it later.
http://www.u-s-silica.com/groundsilica.htm http://www.innovations-report.com/html/reports/materials_science/report-59277.html
John
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John Grossbohlin wrote:

http://www.innovations-report.com/html/reports/materials_science/repor t-59277.html
Calcium carbonate, talc, and kaolin are all very soft, aren't going to do anything to steel. Silica is a different story. Thanks for the answer and links.
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noreaster wrote:

If it's not critical to get the paint off (ie you're not gluing it and the back side isn't visible) then leaving the paint on is likely your best bet.
Alternately, you could just shave off a sixteenth with a big flat bit in your router. The carbide will hold up to the paint better than steel planer knives.
I've also done it with scrapers and an angle grinder, although with abrasives I'm worried that some of it will get stuck in the wood and nick the planer blades.
Chris
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Good idea with the router, bits are cheaper and end result would be less damage to tools. The other side wont be seen at all and would be screwed in.

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On Sep 8, 3:53 pm, "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote:

I'd take it outside and hit it with Zip-Strip. Fast and easy. With painted wood, hidden nails are as much a hazard to your tooling as abrasive paint. If you're using carbide cutters, nails are also liable to create shrapnel, particularly hardened masonry nails.
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"noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote in message

Start with paint stripper and a scraper. It also keeps the paint in one peice and dust-free so it can be safely disposed of, and it sounds like the wood is flat sided. Once you can see wood you can tell if there are nails. Get those out or punch them in deep before using your planer.
Does anyone know, was lead just used in glosses and topcoats, or do you find it in undercoats and primers too?
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A set of planer blades costs me about $45,00. So I remove the paint before using the planer. I do not like to remove paint. It may contain lead and other stuff.
When it is necessary, I use a hot electric iron or a hot air gun. If the coating is very thick, I use a flexible blade scraper.
When the coating of paint is not as thick and more so with latex paint I use a normal scraper and I maintain a sharp edge and angle with a bastard when the scrapper becomes dull. I is useful to have various sizes and shape of crappers.
I have use carbide blade with some degree of satisfaction. The problem is to re-sharpen the edge.
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If you're concerned about lead, removing it with heat isn't the wisest way to go about it. Chemical strippers and chem-resistant gloves would be a better idea.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

Each case has to be analysed. Each project is handled differently. A 50 years old plus exterior front door used on a house compare to an old French finish on a walnut dinning set are very different. As much as I can I try to avoid using chemical. I do not use heat all the time and when I do I wear a proper mask. Most of the jobs are done with hand scrapers of various shapes and configurations. I have used chemicals and learned that using scrapers takes me about the same time or better.
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I had used chemical before to get the old paint off, man that stuff was so nasty.
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