Planer question

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Up to now I have been buying my lumber S4S. I recently purchased a 12" planer and have a 6" jointer. I'll true the face of any boards less than 6" on the jointer and then plane to thickness. How do I handle boards wider than 6"? Will the chatter marks on the rough cut lumber impede getting a smooth surface if I run it through the planer as is? I could experiment, but why mess up a decent board? <G>
Larry
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You can plane right away.. but it will only make the board smooth, not flat.
A planer will take out cup (you maya have to alternatively take a nibble off each fave if the board is thin or baddly cupped), but it will not remove bow or twist.
If your stock if pretty straight and you're not too really anal, it will work just fine. I have an 8" jointer but bump into the same problem occaisionally. If I want, say a 10" wide (unspliced) single piece of wood for a pannel, I'll just go directly to the planer (or mitigate as stated below).
Alternatives are:
1. rip to <6" then joint 2. mitigate bow or twist by jointing the 6" that you can and then rotating to get the other side of the face. take small bites.
3. mitigate bow or twist with an hand plane to knock off the high spots.
BTW always crosscut to rough length first
-Steve
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With a simple jig you can use a planer to flatten a board. http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/2006/10/27/ws
Maybe not the most ideal way but it can be done
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If the board's not too much wider than the jointer's capacity (25% maybe?) and the grain not too argumentative, I'll pull off the guard and make a few light passes while turning the board fore and aft. I can usually get an acceptable/consistant face that'll allow the planer to flatten the other side just fine, then turn her over and plane the originally jointed face. Or just rip down to the jointer's width, mill then glue as StephenM wrote. Tom
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Thanks, guys. I'm picking up some rough cut walnut this weekend and will give it a try.
tom wrote:

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Pull off the guard on a jointer? Do you have ANY idea how incredibly dangerous that is? That guard does more than just cover that meat-grinder. It is also an anti-kick-back device.
That cutter will pull your hand IN and there will be no hope of anybody sewing a bucket of slime back onto your wrist.
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On Sat, 12 Sep 2009 06:40:18 -0700 (PDT), Robatoy

Wow, I would never remove a jointer guard! There are safer (and wiser) methods.
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wrote:

But aren't you supposed to remove the guard to use the ledge to make rabbets on a joiner? Of course, the fence should be positioned to cover the unused portion of the blade.
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"John Siegel" wrote:

Trying to make rabbets with a joiner is a very poor choice of tools for a task IMHO.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Just about every manual I've seen shows direction for doing it.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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My 1948ish 4" HomeCraft / Delta is built to make a rabbit. Yes, you remove the pork chop to do it.
Mike in Ohio
Lew Hodgett wrote:

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"Michael Kenefick" wrote:

No question you can do it, but IMHO, there are far better (safer) ways.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

It's specifically designed for the task -- that's why there's the extension table on the front and the rabbet removed for stock clearance and the support on the rear bed.
Lengthwise, it's the tool of choice...
--
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"dpb" wrote:

I'll pass.
Lew
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So will I. It is not necessary, not safe and not what a jointer is designed to do. If that 'feature' is mentioned, I think it is because that particular model 'needs' another feature because the rest of it is suspect.
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Robatoy wrote:

It almost always has been a design feature -- look at any vintage text or manufacturer's literature. That either one may be too young to have learned it or simply started after the router became ubiquitous is quite likely a major factor...
It still works "most excellent" for the purpose...
--
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"dpb" wrote:

There was also a time when blood letting was considered state of the art medical practice.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Actually, in some forms it again is...
--
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Speaking of that, if you cut a rabbit on the jointer, won't the blood get all over the surface? I'd rather cook it whole if that's the case.
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Why do something dangerous when it can be done safely?
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