planer or jointer for thicknessing

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Wow. Go away for a while and I missed all the fun. Comments embedded. Art

I didn't miss it. I understood you to say you'd use all 3 PT's in succession.

Didn't miss this either and you're right, I'm not overly concerned with this in the case of a table leg.

You seen to be missing the fact that most tools have many uses and capabilities. Admittedly each may be best for a particular use but it is not the sole tool that will do the job.

No. The OP stated that the leg was already "1) planed and shaped properly". The jointer can do the job just fine and, if properly set up, won't leave sniped ends like his benchtop planer will. Furthermore, only the inside edges of a table leg need to be square - one could trim the outside edges with an axe and it isn't going to make any difference in the leg being square to the aprons or floor. I stand by my original post - a jointer will do his job and any error isn't going to be noticed by eye.

Did you change your mind re the jointer or did you just leave it it out now to be argumentative?

I know you appear to be narrow minded, defensive, and arrogant.

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Ther is the right way and of course the path some people take because of a lack of formal training/instruction.

No, he is simply using the method that was taught when this skil was still being taught by those that knew.
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"Leon" wrote

dimensioned
finished
LOL ... re-reading this thread I'm starting to realize that there are damn few left around here who have either used/own a jointer, or have ever actually made a table.
When legs attach to table aprons, it doesn't take much experience to know that, if not square/parallel, at least consistent geometry at the point of the joinery is pretty damn important if the legs are going to stand correctly.
... and they ain't NO way in hell you can guarantee consistent geometry, of any part, or from part to part, after a SINGLE pass over jointer blades!
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No fence on your jointer? <g>
Seriously, I agree that the thickness planer is the right tool for the job. I would remove bulk with a saw if it were any more than 3/16ths being removed.
But the reaction against the jointer (which is NOT the best tool for the job) may be overstated. If I didn't have a planer, I would scribe the desired thickness, run it twice over the jointer with the table set to get a cut of a little less than 3/32. Then observe how close to the scribe line I was getting at all points, set the jointer for superfine cut, and sneak up on the scribe line. If one part of the cut neared the scribe line before another, I'd know that my technique or jointer was off, and would switch to a hand plane for the last few thou.
Or cut it the right size to begin with, but where's the fun in that? <g>
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I recall in shop class Mr. Hardy would put you in line for a couple of licks if he caught any one using the jointer for any purpose other than to straighten an edge or flatten a surface. You were going to do it correctly or not at all. It seems like yesterday, 1968, when he looked every in the eye after making that threat. I remember something about not building on top of mistakes and working from a good foundation, that part was over my head at the time but the threat of the licks make the instructions much more clear.
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How about tapering legs? A common use for the jointer.
scott
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"Scott Lurndal" wrote

A good question, but not the same issue. The OP's was a question on the "thickness" of the piece, not on the tapering of a leg.
Tapering a leg is usually done below the area where the apron joins the leg, thus the area of the joinery is unaffected by using the jointer to do the taper, not to mention that a taper usually doesn't require the same precision that joinery does.
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Table Saw
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snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net says...

With a homemade tapering jig, yes sir.
S.
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samson wrote:

Same here, as long as it's a sled-style jig. Mine isn't on the web right now, but here is a similar version: <http://cdn2.libsyn.com/mattswoodshop/Table_Saw_Taper_Sled_1.pdf?nvb 080816111744&nva 080817111744&t b6c978ef8452973e109>
Some taper jigs (and many other jigs! don't get me going...) are SOOOOOO over complicated, so I totally understand why many skip this method.
A clamping sled jig is very comfortable to use, simple and fast to make, easily adjustable, totally repeatable, and suitable for any angle or number of faces. Another great reason to keep runner stock at the ready.
Hinge-style jigs are evil!
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<http://cdn2.libsyn.com/mattswoodshop/Table_Saw_Taper_Sled_1.pdf?nvb 080816111744&nva 080817111744&t b6c978ef8452973e109>

My latest taper jig is also the sled that I use to straighten 8' boards on the TS.
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On Sat, 16 Aug 2008 02:07:18 +0100, Leon wrote

Axe
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Actually, there is absolutely nothing wrong with using a jointer for this purpose... as long as it is a Stanley #7 or 8 or a similar model from another manufacturer.
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Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar.org
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"Larry W" wrote in message

Agreed ... but it's too bad that's not what the OP wanted to know.
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What I was taught for squaring leg stock, after rough cutting, was to flatten first face, then joint an adjacent second face square and true and finally plane the other surfaces parallel and square.. If you have a decent tablesaw that is decently tuned and has a sharp blade, there's no reason really that you can't substitute the table saw for the planer cuts. In fact on some woods with difficult grain, I think you sometimes can actually avoid tearout and get a smoother surface using a table saw over the planer.

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Of course, I'm assuming the legs are thin enough to rip on a table saw; otherwise, obviously that won't be a solution for you.. Good luck..

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Gosh, after re-reading my message, I may have not been clear. You flatten the first face on the jointer..

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"Jim Hall" wrote

Not too worry ... only the small minded would quibble over a slip of the tongue when it's that obvious that you knew what you were about. Yours was probably the most informative post in the thread thus far.
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I'm totally offended.
JP
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