Planer/Jointer-a relative newbie question


Hello to all.
I recently came across a good deal of rough cut wood and so figured it was time to buy me a planer. As I started looking at planers, I saw that jointers and planers seem to do the same job.
So the question became what is the difference in usage and accuracy? For a general workshop, should I eventually buy both or can one be made to do the work of the other? If both, which first?
Thank you for your answers and opinions, Bill
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A planer will cut the wood to an even thickness, but will not flatten the wood. A jointer will plane an edge to a perfectly flat surface allowing you to make the wood square.
Richard

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A planer does stuff with wood.
A jointer does stuff with wood.
A Google is an even more powerful machine that can tell you _just_exactly_what_ each of them does, and why you only need the thickness planer to begin working your woodpile with.
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There are several threads here if you search around about how to square up wood. And there are as many methods as there are opinions.
The planer has no way of indexing the flatness of the face to be exactly perpendicular (90 degrees) from the edge of the board. The most common method (that I know of) is to do one face on the jointer first. Then do one edge, using the newly flattened face against the jointer fence so the edge is now perfectly perpendicular. Then use the planer to do the other face. then rip on the saw as needed using the straight edge.
Of course you need a jointer that is as wide as the board to do this. Alternatively, you can just plane and rip but it is not as accurate.
Watch closely for the firestorm to follow.
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No firestorm here - you are right. If you had the cash it would be nice to buy both at once but most of us don't. I bought the surface planer first years ago and then figured out I was out of sequence. I would recommend a good jointer first and stake out a friend with a planer until you can get one.

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Some boards must be jointed first, but like you, I've been using my planer now for a couple of years. Still don't have a jointer and I'm not rushing to get one. A lot depends on your wood source as I've been able to but from a supplier that will joint for me at no extra charge.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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The discussions here are right on the money. Having spent several years selling (and milling) hardwood lumber - and many more years using it for furniture - the ideal milling sequence is:
1 - rough-cut the lumber slightly oversize - I usually allow 1/8" over in width, and about 1/2" over in length. 2. joint one face flat (using your jointer). 3. thickness the stock using the thickness planer. 4. joint one edge square to a face. 5. saw the final edge square to the remaining face on the table saw. 6. cross-cut both ends square, and to final length.
Having gone through all of this effort to produce good, flat and square stock, milled to the dimensions you need for your project, it is a good idea to use stickers between layers of pieces until you are ready to do final project assembly.
Have fun!
Jeff
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On Wed, 30 Mar 2005 23:34:27 GMT, Bill Armstrong

A jointer is used to Flatten one side of a board...which then can be made square to an edge....
A Planer is used to flatten the other side of that same board in such a way as both sides are parallel...
I am a firm beliver in buying the jointer first... BUT if you have a knack with hand planes you can produce the needed flat side on a board with hand planes... Just takes a lot longer ..Then run the board thru the planner ...
Honestly IF you intend to use rough cut lumber, as I do, you will find that both are really needed.....
Bob Griffiths..
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