planer

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Boy, I can ditto that sentiment. I found myself out of 1/2 in stock one weekend and found out the hard way what it costs for 1/2 drawer stock. Next time it happened, I resawed a piece of clear 2x4 and ran it thru the planer. Whole helluva lot cheaper than buying it.
Vic
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Same here. My main supplier will put the boards throughthe big planer and take it to size in one pass. Included inthe price.
Every time I think about getting a jointer, something else comes up that just seems like more fun. Some day I'll have one, but I'm not in a rush. Can't get by without my planer though. Good for cleanup after resaw. Good for thing that you don't want to be 3/4" because that is the stock you have on hand.
If I was cutting and air drying my own wood, the story would be different. I'm not so I'll stick with planer first.
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Jointer is good for (and this may be an incomplete list)
-flattening bowed/cupped/twisted stock -cleaning up ripped edges prior to glue up -edge jointing two pieces at one go to insure a perfect fit on glued up panels -rabbeting the edges of panels (you can do this with a router or dado stack as well, of course)
For my buck, the flattening ability is worth it alone- I don't know if you've ever had stock warp after sawing or milling it, but I have, and it's like gettting punched in the belly if you don't have a way to get it back to where it needs to be. You can still use that wood for *something*, but I've had to abandon projects because the stock I had warped while working on them.
I've got a feeling it'd be used heavily, if you end up getting one- though your projects will obviously differ from mine.

FWIW, 50 cents a pass is a steal, unless they're intentionally taking a whole lot of extra passes just to charge extra. Lots of places charge by the hour, and it ends up costing an arm and a leg.

Now that's a different story- of course you should let your wife buy you any tool that she wants! Here I thought you had to pay for it yerself!
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I hardly use mine, but when I do I hammer it for a couple of days solid and save myself a fortune by buying rough timber rather than commercially planed. It's an excellent investment.
I'm still surprised just how useful my bandsaw was.
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Check on actual sources of rough lumber for the cost differences. In my area, rough lumber is in limited availability, and not priced significantly lower, unless I am willing & able to deal with it green. All of my green stock is now fuel for the lathe, so ...
S3S from a good, volume supplier is SO much easier to deal with that the jointer and planer have far less work to do. That's good, because there are parts of the process I enjoy a lot more than initial stock prep.
YMMV
Patriarch
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On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 15:45:39 -0500, Patriarch
With the emphasis on sources, not just grades..
Rough vs. planed is a tiny saving, if I buy them both from the shiny, tidy retail shop. But if I can deal with it rough, then I can buy from the tree hippies instead, who only cost a quarter as much and have nicer timber.
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wrote:

My tree hippies are at least a 100 mile round trip. Or more. While we're not paying Euro prices for fuel yet, it's still a ways, for my meager volume. The deal has to be GOOD.
The bigger the volume, the better the cost savings. As usual.
Patriarch
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Wouldn't want to live without my planer, Once you have worked with stock that is TRULY flat and smooth, you won't go back. I don't have a jointer either. Doubt I ever will. No need.

with
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How do you get the FIRST side flat? Planers only make sides parallel, no? You joint by hand?
-- Michael Campbell
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writes:

Very carefully! I've done a fair amount of rough lumber w/my DW733(?)(The older DW planer) before I had a jointer. If it has any cupping, put convex side up, VERY light cuts so the feed doesn't compress the cupping until you have it flat enough to turn over & work other side. Won't work if the wood is too twisty/bowed, but then again, the jointer isn't going to cure serious problems like that either.
--
Nahmie
The greatest headaches are those we cause ourselves.
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Michael Campbell wrote:

scrub plane.
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I don't know, but I keep reading threads like this and I question how you can get parallel surfaces from using only a planer without first flattening one side of a board, whether by using a jointer or face jointing the board with hand planes.
Wood moves. S4S stock not freshly jointed and planed at the supplier and promptly planed to thickness at home will have cupping or twisting to some extent, and must be surfaced flat if you want to plane to a reduced thickness and have the faces parallel, IMHO. I suppose if you are only talking about 4 or 5 board feet of stock, you can fiddle-fart around with the techniques described using only a planer, but I simply can't imagine preparing 20 bd ft of stock or more that way. Planers go hand in hand with jointers, or with a scrub plane, jack plane and smoother. My first jointer was 6", and I had three 8" wide rough 4/4 figured maple I wanted to make into a panel and couldn't see ripping it in half to face joint, and thus did it by hand, about 10 bd ft, and believe me that was a bit of a workout.
Mutt
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Well, think about it. Assume worst condition - wind (long "i"), which can be repaired by knocking down the high corners by a jointer or hand plane, or by hand feeding a planer, holding the stock flat to the table as it enters and leaves, the interior not even touching. Pretty much as on a jointer.
Second, crown, which can be done by knocking the center down by hand, or, as others have mentioned, by setting your planer so thin that it barely feeds, if, you have an iron planer with a serrated infeed roller, or so it won't feed at all on a lunchbox with rubber rollers, and taking the first pass or two by hand..
You can also make a sled for the absolute worst case, shim and feed. to take care of anything.
With thin wood, you use grooves or other methods in the legs/frames or rabbet a fixed distance from the flat face to take care of cup and twist which can still be in the board.
You must also realize that the wood on most furniture made before machinery was not made with parallel sides, often with just scrub on the back of the board where it wasn't seen. The only important fit was on the front, and construction was planned to put the best face forward.
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Oh, believe me, these techniques are very valid and do work, but to my taste it's just too much fiddling around for "normal" stock prep. when otherwise I'd just give it a few passes on the jointer and plane away. I've got a sled with shims that I have used to surface one side of really wide (+12") stock on special occasions, and it works really well. I guess I'm just too linear minded and like to start off with square and parallel stock....
Mutt
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Find a dictionary and look up the word "parallel" then try again.

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Beggin' your pardon, but two planes that don't intersect are indeed parallel. First plane is the top face of the board, the second is the bottom face of the board. If one face of the board is skewed, extended out enough distance it will intersect with the other face. I don't understand your comment at all.
Mutt.
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Helps if you quote what you are replying to.

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Pig wrote:

also parallel are nested cylinders. and the two faces of cupped or twisted lumber. a thicknesser won't necessarily take care of either of those conditions.
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Yes, I joint by hand. It is so fast and easy, I never saw the need for a jointer. If going through a planer, the stock need only be flat enough so it doesn't rock. If edge gluing, it takes about 2 minutes to prepare a joint.
writes:

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Good deal. I have some hand planes, + a (powered) planer. But no powered jointer. I'm a beginning hobbyist, so wanted to give it a go by hand before I tried trading cash for skill. Thanks for the encouragement. =)
-- Michael Campbell
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