planer

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I am close to finishing my windows. My wife told me that when I finish with the windows, she will buy me a planer.
I look back on all stationary tools I used (since most were bought new). Used all of it, but notice the bandsaw and drill press weren't used much. Wonder if getting a planer would be best investment of all, since then I would be able to buy rough lumber (cheaper)? I don't have a jointer.
Chuck
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Chuck wrote: My wife told me that when I finish with the windows, she will buy me a planer.
I look back on all stationary tools I used (since most were bought new). Used all of it, but notice the bandsaw and drill press weren't used much. Wonder if getting a planer would be best investment of all, since then I would be able to buy rough lumber (cheaper)? I don't have a jointer.
Don't kid yourself, or your wife. You'll want both. Tom
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And then you could probably sell the planer to some guy in Houston....! Tom
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Before I even get into it, I'll admit that I have a planer, but no jointer. With that out of the way...
I'd be willing to bet you'd get more good use out of a jointer- The two tools obviously do different things, but a jointer does more of those different things. Aside from flattening stock, it can be used to cut rabbets, and it works with both edge and face grain with most stock. You *can* thickness with a jointer, but there's no guarantee that the two faces will be parallel.
The planer, on the other hand, only surfaces the wood and brings it down to required thickness- if it is already warped, you need to have an 80% flat surface, which means jointer or handplane in a lot of cases. But unlike the jointer, the two faces are parallel.
They're really a tandem team, but the jointer is more useful (IMO) right out of the box- I have saved some money by having the planer by buying rough stock, but that stock has to be in pretty good shape to make the planer useful- otherwise it ends up being a lot of work, and it's very possible that the money you saved by buying rough wood is offset by the time you spend doing prep.
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My planer smooths slabs after resawing on the BS. Jointer I bought gathers sawdust unused.
On Thu, 28 Jul 2005 04:19:06 -0500, Prometheus

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Hi Chuck, If you plan on buying rough lumber you pretty much need a jointer and a planer unless you have more time than you know what to do with. And you will have to mill a lot of rough lumber to pay for these machines. I have both and would not be without them as a source of good quality dimensioned lumber is not handy and I often make items that use non-standard thicknesses. As I make a fair number of tables/panels I would get a jointer if I were to have just one machine. My 2 cents. Cheers, JG
CNT wrote:

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Well you have to start with one or the other (unless you have enough cash). I got my jointer first but my planer followed closely after. My father had a planer for years with no jointer, so you have to decide. You will buy one and then realize that the other is necessary to what you want to do. I personally would buy the jointer and then the planer but everyone is different.
Lars

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CNT wrote:

Truly, a conundrum. If I were in your position (I was) I'd be tempted to get a drum sander ala Performax (not Delta).
While not as fast as a planer it *can* be used with coarse grit to dress rough lumber effectively. It does a credible job of face joining too. I mostly use my joiner (don't have a planer) for doing edges but those can also be done on a router table.
If I had to get rid of alll stationary tools save saw and one other the "one other" would be the drum sander.
-- dadiOH ____________________________
dadiOH's dandies v3.06... ...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that. Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
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That last sentence is a real conversation starter. I thought about it a while as I recently contemplated a temporary move to San Francisco. Having a 20x30' shop was out of the question, so I had to think small. I was getting around to thinking small good workbench, hand planes, and my beloved bosch jig saw with a broom and dust pan to do dust collection. :-)
Bob
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On 28 Jul 2005 07:17:55 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I think I'd keep the lathe- second choice would be the router table. I figure the rest of it can be done with hand tools almost as easily.

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dadiOH wrote:

I have to agree. I get along with a drum sander and a planer. A jointer would be nice -- but currently no room. I use the drum sander and fence as a jointer -- 60 grit works marvels at flattening most boards. :-) Used in combination with a Taiwanese style Jack plane and smoothing plane (and sometimes a Stanley smoother) most boards can be brought into shape -- eventually. It's slower than a jointer -- but results are just as good.
I started with a table saw, then added a Band saw, a (good) router and a drum sander, a planer and a scroll saw.
Heaviest use goes to the table saw, followed by the drum sander followed by the router. However, as I have added these tools it has become easier to do each project.
I got this Drum Sander kit kit and the top and built the rest -- you can see it on the web site in the sig line... http://nicks.ca/Toolkits.html#sandplan
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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[...]

That is one with the big cross pin for an extra grip trhrough the wooden body? How do you like that compared to other handplane styles?
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Juergen Hannappel wrote:

Actually these are the planes. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p=46322&cat=1,41182,46334
You may have been thinking of these... The Hink Kong Style. I will buy one eventually. http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p=46320&cat=1,41182,46334
The wooden block planes are easy to adjust and simple to use. (pull them)
Saw them demonstrated at Lee Valley, bought one, then bought two more.
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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[...]

Also nice..

Yes, they are the kind I thought of, albeit smaller than I had in mind, you can get them up to jointer size. I have a hollow, a round and a small spokeshave from that manufacturer, as well as a HSS brazed to mild steel iron for my 1942 wooden jack plane ...

Thanks for the info, I also consider getting some of this kind...
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Wow, thanks for the replies! Without owning a jointer, I just don't see myself would use it much? Also, since I plan to start buying lumber from Kettle Moriane Hardwares (Hartford, WI), they have a huge planer. I bought few boards from them before and all they do is pull out the stock I want, throw it in their planer, then it's done (only 50 cents per pass). But no jointer?
I just thought instead of having them planer for me, I would do it myself at home? BTW, I have a 8' JointAbility (again, not use much lately).
I did thought about a jointer some time ago (when I was dreaming of having a woodshop). With all the threads about 6" vs. 8", I decided on JET 8" jointer. Now, that will be lot of money, plus will need a different electrical plug (higher voltage).
I will have to think about it now. Maybe I will still let my wife buy me a planer, maybe the DeWalt 13"?
Chuck
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[...]

Why not get an european style jointer/planer combination machine?
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Web link?

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Perhaps because they cost more than a jointer and a planer put together?
Steve
Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869

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<snip>

The nice thing about having your own is the ability to work your own finished pieces to the thickness you want for that part.
Not everything should be +/- 3/4" thick.
Patriarch
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on 7/28/2005 3:57 PM Patriarch said the following:

Exactly my reason for buying a planer. Thinking of stock for drawer sides, etc. Essentially, anything other that 3/4" or 4/4" boards.
Recycling some pine shelves. Rip to width, resaw, and then clean them up and thickness/clean them up with the planer.
While it's true that the price differential - not even considering the availability of rough wood - between surfaced boards and rough may not be all that great, the planer is just what you need when you want some drawer stock at " or less for that nightstand or jewelry box you're making.
Can you buy the half inch or 3/8" stock? Sure, but you WILL pay for it and probably have to look around to find it.
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