Ping Robatoy. Questions about kitchen counter tops

Sir, being the expert that you are in the counter top world I would like your opinion and explanation of a few things. I have a customer/friend of many years that I am going to do some kitchen refreshing for. Currently they have plastic laminate counter tops that have the bull nose front and built in formed back splash. They want new kitchen counter tops. I advised probably to step up a grade over plastic laminate.
What do you suggest? They are considering granite, Siltstone/ Quartz, and Corieon?
They are leaning towards something other than granite.
Can you give me some pro's and con's of the different type tops, any thing to steer clear of?
Think You!
Leon
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I think I can help with that question, but I'm off to cnc school again in a few minutes. I will address this later this evening.
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I think I can help with that question, but I'm off to cnc school again in a few minutes. I will address this later this evening.
Great, I think they are having someone from Stilestone come out tomorrow to give a bid. Thanks again.
Leon
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Don't overlook slate. It's the new granite. Wood can be very, very nice too. Much quieter and warmer - especially if it's an eating surface. Solid surface is losing it's luster it seems.
JP
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Jay Pique wrote:

I'd also consider concrete.
http://www.concretecountertops.net/modules/content/index.php?id 
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
  Click to see the full signature.
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i made some concrete counters for my patio bar last year. they have a lot of dyes and colorants, and you can use inclusions of all types for different looks (glass, colored pebbles, polished rocks, fossils, car parts, etc).
http://www.flickr.com/photos/chaniarts/2362099481 / http://www.flickr.com/photos/chaniarts/2359619331 /
it wasn't too bad making and polishing them, but moving them around by myself got challenging. they are heavy.
regards, charlie cave creek, az
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"charlie" wrote

Reminds me of a project at my last house. There was a patio that had concrete squares about 48" square. I had to remove some of them and put in a garage addition and a drain. There was no rebar. I found some bakery bread racks in some. And in others, I found all kinds of parts from an old refrigerator.
So, yeah, you can put almost anything in concrete. (This is something that all the old time mobsters knew as well.)
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Thanks charlie, I would like to do that for myself someday but I think I'd reluctant to experiment on a paying customers kitchen.
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Don't overlook slate. It's the new granite. Wood can be very, very nice too. Much quieter and warmer - especially if it's an eating surface. Solid surface is losing it's luster it seems.
JP
Slate? For a kitchen counter top? I would think it would be a bit to porous. I'll have to mention it to them. Thanks
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.
No - it's excellent. Some recommend sealing it, but we do a lot of business with Sheldon Slate and they say don't put anything on it - so we don't. They're great to work with, btw. And if you scratch it or do get a stain on it, just sand it out. Not like Corian either - you don't need to get all microabrasive with it.
JP
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wrote:
No - it's excellent. Some recommend sealing it, but we do a lot of business with Sheldon Slate and they say don't put anything on it - so we don't. They're great to work with, btw. And if you scratch it or do get a stain on it, just sand it out. Not like Corian either - you don't need to get all microabrasive with it.
JP
What is the color like other than grey and how does it compare in price to granite? I think my customers are steering toward a light color and something that will look good with maple.
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Silestone, Cambria, Ceasar Stone and my favourite Hanstone, are all quartz. 93% quartz aggregate with an acrylic binder. That is by far my favourite countertop surface. Can't be stained, 10 year warranty, takes a lot of heat, uniform colours and the ability to be seamed (if done my a pro) in a much nicer way than granite. If the budget dictates a less expensive product, it is still hard to beat Staron, Corian, Meganite. The seamless aspect, non staining and the fact that it can be refinished like new and repaired virtually invisibly and a 10-year warranty all make it an attractive purchase.... and a LOT of colours to chose from.
The concrete, slate, bamboo, broken glass, paper, and a host of other 'green' (gimmicky) countertops are cute and different... and in many cases very expensive. Concrete, done by an experienced professional is a lot more than quartz.
For my money? Hanstone quartz or Staron 100% acrylic solid surface. The Staron Tempest series is just fabulous.
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.
Oops.. forgot the shameless plug of my company's website
www.topworks.ca
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Oops.. forgot the shameless plug of my company's website
www.topworks.ca
Thank you Sir! I am sure that your input will be a great help in the decision process.
Leon
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My father and I cut and installed my soapstone countertops. I selected soapstone because it basically cannot be damaged by heat and really cannot be stained by any stuff you have in your kitchen. It can also be worked with just normal woodworking tools. We went through a couple router bits and one diamond blade for a skil saw. To care for them, they just get a coat of oil once a week - or whenever I think about it. The best part is that it is absolutly gorgeous. I purchased the stone online from http://www.soapstones.com /.
At the time they were out of the cobra soapstone and I had to wait about 4 weeks for it to ship in from india. It was pretty easy to work with - but heavy, heavy, heavy!
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