Ping: PuckDropper

PuckDropper,
You asked me to report/review on the "Chemical Splash Goggles" from Lee Valley (on page 224 of their catalog) a few months ago.
I wore them for a couple hours while I was sanding some drywall compound recently. Indeed they do not fog. However, my glasses fog inside on them (it looks strange). As I found my (Stanley?) $2-3 goggles totally unusable due to fogging, the Lee Valley product has value.
They are a snug fit over my glasses--which are not all that big. But I realized that if that were not a snug fit, then they wouldn't provide as much protection.
There is a strip of rubber along the edge of the polycarbonate that makes a comfortable fit to the face. It readily comes off. I presume that it will determine the lifetime of the goggles as I doubt it is replaceable.
Let me know if you have any questions I might be able to answer. For $19.50, you can't go too far wrong on this, unless they don't go over your glasses.
Bill
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Thanks Bill.
The goggles being a tight fit to the glasses isn't too surprising. One pair of chemical splash goggles I have require putting the glasses in the goggles first then putting the entire thing on. (Otherwise it will push the glasses back to an uncomfortable position.)
When I get fogging, it's very often the glasses fogging first. It might just be a trait of goggles over glasses. I wonder if some kind of forced ventilation might address it? Something like a small cell-phone vibrator motor and button cell battery, perhaps?
I've mostly eliminated the fogging problem by switching to a Trend Airshield Pro. It's got its own drawbacks (weight, comfort) but at least I'm not running in to a safety issue with glasses fogging up halfway through a cut.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 28 Jun 2013 07:56:13 GMT, Puckdropper

As I mentioned to Bill, you can get an anti fog coating for eyeglasses. ~ Something you might consider the next time you get a prescription filled.
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Your only recourse would be to get lens with an anti fog coating for your glasses. Can't comment on the effectiveness of such a coating as I've never chosen that option when ordering my eye glasses.
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snipped-for-privacy@none.com wrote:

IIRC, my dad used to apply something to his glasses that was intended to prevent fogging. If such a product is available it shouldn't be too hard to track down these days.
Bill
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Bill wrote:

Here's some stuff with a catchy name:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)72466512&sr=8-10&keywords=prevent+fog+on+glasses
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On 6/28/2013 5:40 PM, Bill wrote:

http://www.wikihow.com/Keep-Car-Windows-Fog-Free-Using-a-Potato
or http://tinyurl.com/y8hql5f
Honest, it's true. Would this face lie to you?     mahalo,     jo4hn
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jo4hn wrote:

Thanks, I may give it a try sometime.
Bill
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On these hot days, it's difficult enough keeping your whistle wet, much less having extra spit to wet your goggles. You might assist your tongue, with some beers, for producing a sufficient amount of spit.
Sonny
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