Ping Lew Hodgett

Hi Lew,
On your advice, I got some epoxy and microballoons to fix the broken desk leg outlined in another post.
I'm practicing on a piece of scrap as I write this, and that part seems to be going well.
Something about your earlier posting has me a bit confused tho. You mentioned :
"There is a caveat.
It is almost certain that the repair would be visible, at least from one side."
In the piece I'm gluing up now, once it's sanded, I don't see how any one side will show any more than the other. The repair showing is the least of my worries at this point. The breakage is just where the leg attaches to the desk, at the back, and behind a skirt. In all likelihood I'll be the only one who knows it's there.
From what I can see on the scrap piece, all sides will show a bit of glue line. I can live with that. If I'm missing something and I can isolate that to only one side, it's even better. Or is it just that it'll show slightly on all sides?
Thanks.
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Tanus

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"Tanus" wrote:

The only purpose in practicing on scrap was to give you an idea of what the repair would look like when finished, and yes, depending on the break, it may show on all sides which is why I wanted you to test on some scrap.
If you are happy with the results you get on the scrap, then go for it.
Remember one thing.
Epoxy filled with micro-balloons (fairing putty) can be used to fill gaps and replace lost splinters as long as you are happy with the appearance of the finished glue line.
You don't want to apply excessive clamp pressure and squeeze out all the fairing putty in the joint.
Just enough to get a good repair.
BTW, use clear packing tape to protect areas where you don't want any excess fairing putty to bond.
Allow your repair to stay in the clamps at least 48 hours before you mess with it.
Patience is a virtue.
Have fun.
Lew
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Thanks Lew. Glad you cleared that up for me. As stated, the glue line won't be much of an issue. My biggest concern is strength and that seems to be solved.
I'm so glad you suggested this. Otherwise I was going to get creative, and that likely would have been disasterous.
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"Tanus" wrote:

Keep me posted.
After you become comfortable doing them, you will find that epoxy repair applications are like crab grass.
They just keep growing.
Have fun.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Well, I'm not there yet. I tried the epoxy/microballoons on a test piece, and tested its resilience. Nada. The break re-broke with almost on pressure on it.
I'm torn between two reasons, or maybe a combination of the two.
1. I may have put too much pressure on clamping. I didn't use much and didn't "think" that it squeezed out too much but the joint was covered with waxed paper, so maybe it was excessive.
2. I glued up in the shop, with the heat on. Temp was about 55-60 when I joined. Instead of bringing the piece inside, I forgot it, and it stayed out all night in ~20 degrees. (Shop cools off real fast when the heat is turned off.)
I'm leaning towards #2, but I had the impression that epoxy cured under cold conditions, just that much slower. The piece has been inside for the last 5 days. Maybe it doesn't cure at all when it's exposed to those temps?
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Tanus

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"Tanus" wrote:

The clamps want to be just snug.

Epoxy and I have a lot in common.
Anything below 60F SUCKS.
Epoxy produces an exothermic reaction when curing, but if the parts remain cold and the ambient temp is below 60F, all bets are off.
If you can do the work where it is warm, you should be a happy camper.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

Above 60 did the trick. And yes, I'm amazed at the strength that bond has now.
My one regret is that while I clamped one side, I didn't clamp the other, and the joint came out a bit "bent". Lesson learned.
I had a backup plan worked out in case this didn't come out as planned, but I suspect you're right and I'll be using this kind of bond more and more often. I could near drive a truck over that joint and the piece would break anywhere but.
Thanks again.
Tanus
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"Tanus" wrote:

Working with epoxy is like sex, good scotch, and Lays potato chips, one is not enough<G>.
Get a copy of the Gougeon Brothers book on epoxy from the library, lots of good info.
You can also get a free publication, Epoxy Works from them.
Google "west systems"
Glad I was able to help.
Have fun.
Lew
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