Ping Leon

Don't know if you're still interested in a edge sander, or want to mess with 3 phase equipment, but there is a sander in Houston for sale.... also, two flammable cabinets, if those may be of interest. http://irsauctions.com/index_lots.asp?pg ήtails&id717
Sonny
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/24/2015 8:56 AM, Sonny wrote:

Wow, Sonny! Your memory is pretty good. I have resigned to not have an edge sander at this point.
I mostly wanted it to clean up rail and stile joints on the tops and bottoms. I since have figured out a way to clamp these assemblies that require very little sanding afterward.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, February 24, 2015 at 1:27:12 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

OK, so please share the technique. I'm going to be at that point in my kitchen project soon...err...I mean...eventually.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/24/2015 2:41 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

this out. ;~)
A picture is worth a thousand words. Basically during normal glue up the rails will end up slightly shy or proud of the ends of the stiles. This mismatch has to be cut and or sanded off.
The picture does not show the clamps that hold the stiles against the rails, this comes after, the pictured clamps are in place insuring that the outer edges of the rails are perfectly lined up with the ends of the stiles.
The 4 lighter colored oak pieces are to protect the walnut on the inside and to insure positive alignment on the top and bottom.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/lcb11211/12140851433/
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, February 24, 2015 at 4:41:06 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Damn! I'm gonna need more clamps.
I assume the smaller clamps are simply there to hold the oak to the rail so it can be put in place as a single unit. No fumbling with the rail and the oak as separate pieces while trying to set up the long clamps, right?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/24/2015 5:58 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

top edge of the rail. The rail therefore cannot slide further past the ends of the stiles because the oak is longer than the rails. The long clamps insure that the oak and rail unit do not come short of the bottom of the rails. After these steps I apply a clamp perpendicular across the ends of the stiles to squeeze up tight to the rails.
The small clamps are instrumental in insuring no gap between the oak and the rails. I assessable the rails and stiles first and then add the oak pieces and clamps to index everything properly.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, February 24, 2015 at 7:58:30 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Thanks.
If you were to use this technique with stub tenon joints, what would you use to prevent the squeeze-out from sticking to the oak? Wax paper? Packing tape? Painters tape?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/24/2015 9:40 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

joints. I waxed the oak with paste wax
AND, and..and.... I don't leave the clamps, seen in the picture, on during the curing process. I remove those clamps as soon as I have applied the top and bottom clamps that run parallel and over/under the top and bottom rails. I just use the pictured set up to hold every thing in place before I use the clamps that will actually be holding the joints together.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, February 24, 2015 at 11:12:51 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Well...that certainly reduces the number of new clamps I'll need. :-)
Thanks again.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/24/2015 10:23 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

door. Only 2 remain on the assembly while the glue dries.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, February 25, 2015 at 3:21:33 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Any tricks for ensuring that the doors end up perfectly flat? I've not been through the process yet...I'm just trying to be prepared for all issues.
Not only flat, but square also. I assume that a properly cut stub tenon will ensure squareness, but can something cause the door not to come out flat during the glue-up? If so, what's the trick (there's always a trick!) to preventing/fixing that?
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/25/2015 1:26 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

A flat assembly table. ;-) I learned the hard way. :-(
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/25/2015 2:26 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Clamp on a flat surface and use flat wood.

with the ends of the stiles naturally squares the set up but as you suspected square cut pieces proper clamped will self square.
If your bottom clamps are not on the same plane they will introduce twist to the glue up. Clamps sitting on a flat surface is the number one thing you need to insure. Straight and flat stock is always helpful. ;~) FWIW I never check my doors for square. If the cuts are square and the joints are properly closed it comes out square.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net says...

Today.
--
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
βœ–
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.