Ping: Larry Jaques - Re plate Joiner

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On 10/29/2012 8:16 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I disagree, and from a strong personal experience.
Both my grandfathers built and furnished their entire homes, from the ground up, without a table saw.
I worked for a cabinetmaker in England who's family made cabinets and furniture for 200 years without a table saw.
I personally made many of my own household furnishing for 30 years before I ever owned a table saw, much less a decent one.
Historically, and after thousands of years of making wooden furniture, you can cut wood many different ways, but there are only relatively few time tested methods of JOINERY to this day.
The Domino, and similar devices, opened the door to a far more universally applicable method of JOINERY for the average woodworker.
IOW, cut the best way you can, but master the JOINERY, or you're pissing in the wind.
Nuff said ...
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I think it's what you grew up with, what you're used to that's most important. I grew up with a table saw as the main stay of a workshop. It's what I know, what I was trained on and what I look for first when I enter any wood shop.
Maybe a track saw can replace the tablesaw. When I saw what a Domino could do, I knew right away that I wanted one. I just don't get the same feeling when I see what a track saw could do. It's just not in me.
And, by saying that, I can understand how and why many here dismiss the Domino as not being necessary. It's just not in them.
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Dave wrote:

I saw a video on the Domino and I can appreciate why those in the the "time is money" camp like them. It's not too complicated: If someone will get enough use (or enjoyment) out of it, then they might buy one.
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

---------------------------------------------------------------- "Swingman" wrote:

----------------------------------------------------- And the Amish only use hand power on the job site; however, they do use tablesaws powered from stationary power in the shop.
Being a "Normite", give me a good table saw with a great fence, a good dado set with a sacrifical fence and I'm happy.
Lew
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On Mon, 29 Oct 2012 18:16:28 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

Yeah, I have to agree with that. I really like my Domino, but for me a tablesaw is the first, highest requirement. I got along a number of years without a Domino, but a tablesaw has *always* been along for the ride in one form or another.
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Swingman made a good point about considering the bandsaw as the first choice. I prefer having both, but for someone just starting to obtain tools, they need to consider what they will be trying to do. Unfortunately we all have to deal with some kind of budget.
Mike M
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Mike M wrote:

I will be trying to be a craftsman.
I've read several of the books that Paul N. Hasluck co-wrote/edited. I may build a chicken coop with Acanthus leaves and floral ornamentation carved on the outside. I might pound some nails and string some wires, and pluck the strings like a banjo or guitar...
Is one supposed to start with chickens or eggs? I may have to go with Festool is the they don't like my shopvac...
Cheers, Bill

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Bill everyone is giving ;you suggestions on what they learned. Right or wrong it is for you decide what works for you. You make the best decision for you.
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Mike M wrote:

Yes, I appreciate that. I was just having a little fun with more prior post--but I meant the part about "craftsman".
With regard to what you said, concerning "joining" tools, I added a $21 (router) slot cutter to my Amazon wish list. That tool suggestion surely saved me close to $200 for the time being. I think the tool is quite adequate for "where I am at" too.
I can have a lot of fun with a pencil. I just can't cut a dado with one.
Cheers, Bill
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vs Crapsman?

I grabbed the HF set one day, before I bought a bisquicker. They're a bother, comparatively, but for under $8... It's saved for splines. http://www.harborfreight.com/three-wing-slotting-cutters-3-pack-42133.html

Where "at" is you, anyway?

They really have to be spinning to achieve that.
-- It is easier to fool people than it is to convince people that they have been fooled. --Mark Twain
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Larry Jaques wrote:

I guess there is Cheap, and then there is Super-Cheap! How do your 5/32" biscuits fit into the 1/8" slots? I assume you're not using the 1/4" slots.

That's the thing about woodworking (as pointed out in an interesting post by HA* the other day). Everyone seems to approach it having different background and experience. With regards to your question, I am "here"! At least that's what the map says :)

Yes, if you have any old Tinker Toys lying around, you can make a fly cutter bit! : ) That's the fact, Jack!

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THAT was the other teensy little problem, and one of the main reasons I bought the cheapie bisquicker a bit later. <vbg>

You can't get there from here.

Ah, the wonders of Tinker Toys. I preferred the Erector Set over Lincoln Logs and Tinker Toys. Mom still remembers how impressed she was when I built the moving robot back in '60. It makes a kid proud to have a proud Mom, y'know?
-- It is easier to fool people than it is to convince people that they have been fooled. --Mark Twain
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Larry Jaques wrote:

I see. You just wondered if you could make me make the same mistake! :)

Yes, I did Lincoln Logs, then the Erector Set. I built the "Windmill" a few times..that was a "big project". My sister had a set of Tinker Toys and neither of us liked them. I did have a set of mostly red/orange plastic bricks that taught me a little about construction.. ; )
And 15 seconds later here they are:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/HALSAM-AMERICAN-PLASTIC-BRICKS-745-CONSTRUCTION-TOY-BLOCKS-558-OF-585-PIECES-/271092240253?pt=Building_Toys_US&hash=item3f1e5b4f7d
in less time than it would take to dig them out of the attic.
Mom still remembers how impressed she

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Do you see anywhere in that paragraph where I suggest you buy them, hmm? You had already bought your slotter, anyway.

My sister and I got some large scale building in with Tinker Toys.

Premature eBayulation?

I never saw or played with those or Lego.
-- It is easier to fool people than it is to convince people that they have been fooled. --Mark Twain
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Larry Jaques wrote:

These came long before Lego. I read where some "purists" don't like it when they are referred to as "Pre-Lego". Someone wrote an easy to find product history (which I got sucked into). Turns out there were two brothers named Hal and Sam... : )

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On 10/30/2012 9:49 PM, Bill wrote:

Pay attention, Bubba ... _The Man_ himself speaks!!
http://www.finewoodworking.com/SkillsAndTechniques/SkillsAndTechniquesArticle.aspx?id0187
Note the technique that Norm uses to mount face frames to casework using biscuits and a slot cutter, as Lew suggested.
What he doesn't mention is that this technique allows you to adjust the FF position, similar to what Leon was saying about making the Domino mortises a little wider in length to gain some "wiggle room" in fitting the parts together.
Disclaimer ... I do not use this method of attaching FF's, but do not have a problem with recommending it if it suits your needs.
(I prefer the dado in the FF method because it allows me to concentrate on building a very square FF, then assembling the cabinet casework on top of that guaranteed square FF, insuring a SQUARE cabinet ... making drawers, doors, and hardware much easier to install overall, and saving me enough time to make a profit on the job)
YMMV ...
--
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Last update: 4/15/2010
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Thanks for the post!
Bill
Swingman wrote:

http://www.finewoodworking.com/SkillsAndTechniques/SkillsAndTechniquesArticle.aspx?id0187
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Swingman wrote: <snip>

Yep, that little tip is worth the price of admission right there!

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I'm still caught on the "wider in length" bit, myself. Izzat a metric trick?
-- It is easier to fool people than it is to convince people that they have been fooled. --Mark Twain
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On 10/31/2012 6:29 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Use your imagination and/or zen it (sit still for long period, with arms folded and pregnant countenance) and it will eventually be revealed to you ... ;)
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Last update: 4/15/2010
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