Ping: Larry Jaques - Re plate Joiner

Page 2 of 4  
I holeheartedly agree about the band saw. about 20 years ago, I received the advice of going for a bandsaw over a tablesaw. I rejected that advice and went with the tablesaw. I could make straight stuff, but needed my jig saw to make any shaped stuff.
I then bought a Delta 14" later. I struggled, because I hadn't set it up correctly, even though I read Dukinske's book. It was not like I had been used to in my younger years, I used a mamoth bandsaw when I was young.
Well, I finally tuned my bandsaw (following Duginskee and by ear) and love it. I stopped using the point and went back to the fence for resawing. Relief cuts for curves, and the proper blade most of the time. The saw performs great now. I wish I had gone for the Laguna (came out b4 I made the Bandsaw purchase) or the Jet 18" way back. But hind sight is 20/20. Wish I had more HP, but my Timberwolf solved a lot of the problems I had. The OLSON blade was crap.
You don't need a tracksaw, but it wouldn't hurt. A regular circ saw can be made to follow a track, homemade or store bought. I made my own tempered hardboard track. it works great for fast dimensioning.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 29 Oct 2012 11:12:19 -0400, tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com>

Maybe its just my poor cutting technique, but with a guide or not, best blade I could find, I could never get a regular circular saw to cut as smooth and splinter free line as my table saw.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 28 Oct 2012 20:57:52 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

I agree 100%. My Domino is indispensable to me in many areas, but it's always proceeded by what I cut on the tablesaw. I grew up with access to a tablesaw until I bought my first one at 18 years of age. Every shop I used after that was always arranged around a tablesaw.
Eventually, I bought a biscuit joiner that did what it was supposed to. But, once I bought the Domino, the biscuit joiner sat on a shelf virtually unused for the next two years. Ended up selling it and 2000 biscuits for $50. If memory serves, the biscuits themselves cost me $80, but don't regret letting the joiner go one bit.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/29/2012 2:53 AM, Dave wrote:

I buy biscuits by the box, 6 bag boxes. I get them, 1800, for about $80. so about 4.4 cents each. I used to pay $30 for 1000 biscuits, or .3 cents each. The price difference is not a factor. The quality of the 5mm domino over the biscuit is.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

At a guess, I'd think that biscuits are stamped out and easier to make than Dominos. But they cost more and it's like many other things that are priced inordinately high. They will take you for whatever the market will bear.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/29/2012 10:57 PM, Dave wrote:

Yeah, biscuits appear to be stamped out, the edges do not appear to be milled or cut. I also find them to be inconsistent in thickness, I often found that some fit the same hole too loosely or too tightly.
Toss in that a proper depth biscuit slot is much wider than the biscuit and that the biscuit alignment on only good for up and down. Side to side is a no go.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon, wrote the following at or about 10/30/2012 8:04 AM:

IIRC the biscuit ARE stamped AND compressed. This is built-in functionality, I'm told. Do your dry fit, then add the glue, insert biscuits and clamp up the assembly. They will swell slightly to provide a tight fit.
This is one reason you don't use them close to the finished edge as that swelling will "telegraph" through.
That you find some are too loose or too snug could merely be a sign of the ambient conditions under which they were stored.

Dominoes would sure cure that, I suspect<g>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/30/2012 12:18 PM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

One would think but the loose ones and the tight ones and the correct fit ones all come from the same bag stored in the same Tupperware container. I never have this issue with solid wood tenons.

They can if necessary, the Domino will cut a mortise to exact width and thickness. More often than not however I set the Domino to cut a mortise that is slightly wider so that mortise placement is not too critical to give me a touch of wiggle room. IIRC with a biscuit you could probably have as much as 3/8" wiggle room like it or not.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

I assume that's especially true for a slot cut using a router (with a slot-cutter bit). But If you have at least one biscuit on each of two perpendicular planes (like the rails and the stiles), it seems like that would work fairly-well, no?
I watched a video which showed the user cutting one Domino slot as a "tight-fit" and the parallel ones as loose fits to facilitate *assembly*. The tight fit one was to facilitate *placement*.
BTW, if you had your choice, would you rather have Bosch corded (JS-470) or cordless Li-ion jig saw. They are close to the same price since I already own batteries. My gut tells me the corded one is probably better made (and built to last). Of course, I am pleased with my cordless drill and impact driver. Maybe I'm just slow to adapt. I just got a cordless phone, and I leave it plugged in... : )
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/28/2012 5:36 PM, Mike M wrote:

Agree there, having both the PC 557 and the Domino, choosing the Domino over the PC 557 is like choosing square drive over straight. I keep the PC557 as there are odd times when I need a narrow moon shaped slot, like for a desk drawer lock with the swinging arm that needs to turn into a slot.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I'll have to remember that use.
Mike M
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 29 Oct 2012 08:11:18 -0700, Mike M

My palm sander with a slot cutter does that job. Nope, biscuit joiner still gets put on the forsale block.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have the less-precise HF version, but it works OK. I keep threatening to tear it down and put a simple shim washer in there to make it perform better, but never seem to get around to it. Maybe this winter... The plate has slop so I get wider-than-required biscuit holes. Then again, it was $150 cheaper than the others and I seldom use it. I learned to leave the power on while removing it and it cuts only 0.010" wide that way, and biscuits swell that much. They're on sale for $45 today. <wink>
I have a Makita 4-1/2" angle grinder and an HF grinder. Both are great.
The more I use the Makita SP6001K plunge saw, the more I like it. I sold Dina and will use the little Makita and my portable 10" table saw in the future. Between the two, she should be replaced OK. The new owner will be picking it up sometime this next week. He's a high- volume Old Tool owner from Woodburn, up by Portland, OR.
Here's a truly lousy bisquick review: http://www.woodmagazine.com/woodworking-tools/reviews/more/biscuit-joiners-tool / They hate every single model. <g>
How about a used DeWally for $120?
-- No greater wrong can ever be done than to put a good man at the mercy of a bad, while telling him not to defend himself or his fellows; in no way can the success of evil be made quicker or surer. --Theodore Roosevelt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/28/2012 4:35 PM, Bill wrote:

Most all better brand companies these days make a good plate joiner. The PC 557 is probably the majority choice. And I have that one too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Did you choose it because it came with the extra cutter and finish bisquits for only a bit more money? Besides it being a high quality tool, of course.
-- No greater wrong can ever be done than to put a good man at the mercy of a bad, while telling him not to defend himself or his fellows; in no way can the success of evil be made quicker or surer. --Theodore Roosevelt
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/29/2012 1:53 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

I bought mine as an eeeeearllly type 1. I bought it to replace my 556 plate joiner which was belt drive. IIRC at the time it had the best fence design. Some design feature of the fence infringed on DeWalts patent thus Type 2 which everyone disliked. I paid $197 IIRC I do have the FF cuter but seldom used it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Leon wrote:

I just happened to see the 557 at Menards today, for $199 including the extra 2" blade for "FF" biscuits. They didn't have any plain 'ole 5/32" slot cutters for a router. I noticed that there doesn't appear to be a dramatic difference in size between 0, 10 and 20 size biscuits. They only had artificial biscuits made in China, so I passed. I'm looking for home-cooked Beech biscuits! : )
Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/29/2012 5:35 PM, Bill wrote:

I'm going with Leon, Dave and others who mentioned this ... add that $199 to the kitty and get a Festool Domino ... I can almost guarantee that your ability to do the woodworking projects of your dreams will take a GIANT leap forward.
No kidding ...
--
www.eWoodShop.com
Last update: 4/15/2010
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Swingman" wrote:

Without having a descent table saw first, this whole tread has put the cart before the horse IMHO.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/29/2012 8:16 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

He can easily make do with a quality track saw at the fraction of the cost of a like quality TS.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.