Ping Larry Jaques

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www.heritagequest.com allows census images to be downloaded this way. The other option is a PDF. 80% of the images I have are in .TIF.
Mike in Ohio
Dave Balderstone wrote: <snip>

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Downloaded.
Displayed in a web browser?
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Yes.
Dave Balderstone wrote:

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Which web browser displays TIFFs?
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On Sat, 14 Nov 2009 12:22:41 -0600, the infamous Dave Balderstone

Only if you have either the Alternatiff or other free plugin.
http://www.uspto.gov/faq/plugins/tiff.jsp
-- When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary. -- Thomas Paine
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I thought as much. TIFF has never been a standard web graphic format.
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On Sat, 14 Nov 2009 23:01:04 -0600, the infamous Dave Balderstone

Martin said Mosaic could handle it. I have a book on Mosaic around here somewhere, in my "300+ books to sell on eBay some day" stack, I think. Wanna buy it? It's the pretty purple one. I think I have another purple book on Ventura Publisher in that stack, too.
-- When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary. -- Thomas Paine
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This was pre Netscape and pre the thoughts of IE. Mosaic displayed it and we used it. I've downloaded massive files from federal sites at their allowance. Scanners continue to ask what format. I have several programs on this computer that modify Tif and use them.
The key that you state is 'a standard' - The standards went towards jpg compressed and move and jiggle jpgs - and naturally movies.
Tif is an old format and has gone through 6 or more versions of internal information.
Retire this thread. I was there I did it. You were not and it doesn't matter.
Martin
Dave Balderstone wrote:

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This was an old version - long time ago. And I use TIF/TIFF when I want full graphics.
Otherwise you get compressed junk that might look ok and might not.
My camera generates it and it is a high quality picture.
NASA posts TIF in the their very high res pictures.
It isn't new it is one of the older versions.
The newest is a short movie as a picture. Getting out of hand. On internal nets - all sorts of formats are used. On external webs lots of formats are used but mostly bmp and jpg.
Map formats are TIF or other professional formats. Scientific drawings are in Tif - I have a DNA drawing in that format. And naturally lots of personal pictures as well.
Ever write documents or draw in post script ? or .eps ? That is why HP printers have post script options. People now days use pdf of something else.
I have the programming manual.
Martin
Dave Balderstone wrote:

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You seem to be confused. The fact that TIFFs are posted and available for download has no relationship to TIFF being a standard for web graphics. TIFF is NOT a standard for web graphics.
And yes, I have actually hand-coded PostScript and pushed it through an interpreter that produced output on a laser printer. If my memory serves, it would have been in about 1991 or 92 when I took a course in Postscript coding at the University of British Columbia.
In fact, I've been working in the publishing industry for over 30 years and remember the first PostScript capable printers. I used to service them.
This programming manual you refer to... Do you mean the full set of the Red Book, the Blue Book and the Green Book, as originally published by Adobe? Or do you mean something else?
Because, if you are continuing to claim that TIFF was an early standard for graphics on the World Wide Web (and BTW, I took our newspaper to the web in August 1995, so I think I have some standing in this conversation) then I am going to call Bullshit.
TIFF was never and has never been a standard graphic format for display in a web browser.
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On Sat, 14 Nov 2009 23:11:53 -0600, the infamous Dave Balderstone

Dave, Martin's key word is "was", and he was talking about the Internet's Neanderthal Years, way back before Netscape reigned. Just chill.
-- When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary. -- Thomas Paine
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The issue is your English style. I never stated it was a web standard. You state that... Who cares - we used it.
The graphic browser - Mosaic displayed Tiff. (two f's for UNIX, one for MS). So the browser knew of the TIFF standard and was able to display.
Martin
Dave Balderstone wrote:

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Dave Balderstone said:

(For those who don't know what this thread is about...)
Well, hell. I've never saw TIFF included in a browser either. There are browser add-ons for TIFF but no public release browsers I've ever seen supported TIFFs natively. (since 1986 anyway) The government computers I worked with since 1987 (FORCECOM, DOD, Lockheed, etc.) included nothing like this either. TIFF is a licensed technology owned by Aldus, now Adobe. Aldus PageMaker was the first program I saw that used TIFFs and Postscript both. TIFF was developed in an attempt to get scanner manufacturers to adopt a common standard for desktop publishing purposes.
AIR, TIFFs were first suggested for experimental use in remote printing applications on ARPA Net in RFC1486 in 1993 and was first suggested as a web image format in RFC2302 in 1998 although a fax only B&W format F was defined in RFC1528 in 1993.
PDFs contain Postscript derivative code. Ghostscript is often used as the engine behind some public domain PDF writers.
All this noise about image formats and I've not seen mention of PNG? Poised as a replacement for the GIF format, which was later held to be under license by Unisys and possesses a limited palette, the PNG format appeared first in 1996 as RFC2083. Later adopted as a W3C recommendation that same year.
The advantage of lossless isn't as much poor image quality as it is multiple edits with the algorithm resulting in gradual degradation. Many cameras have a RAW format which is based on the TIFF format, in addition to the JPG format which allows storing more pictures on a card.
GIF, PNG, and JPG are most popular on the web and have a mime type although TIFF now (since 1998) has a defined mime type as well.
Greg G.
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On Fri, 13 Nov 2009 20:43:51 -0600, the infamous "Martin H. Eastburn"

Yeah, OK. I didn't get into it until it had gone fully public and personal computers were readily available. You were Inner Sanctum. ;)
-- You know, in about 40 years, we'll have literally thousands of OLD LADIES running around with TATTOOS, and Rap Music will be the Golden Oldies. Now that's SCARY! --Maxine
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On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 20:48:40 -0600, the infamous "Martin H. Eastburn"

Cool!
Yes, I used it as my first browser!

Was it used mostly in the medical and/or scientific fields, for x-ray transfers, astronomy, and such? It never made it to the wider public that I know of.

Ayup, you have 7-8 years on me there. I sure like what the Web has turned into since then, don't you? Back then, it was a large step up from the BBSes I hung out on, but look what it can do and provide today. Amazing. I love it!

My Nikon D-40 does RAW and JPG.
-- You know, in about 40 years, we'll have literally thousands of OLD LADIES running around with TATTOOS, and Rap Music will be the Golden Oldies. Now that's SCARY! --Maxine
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We were using FrameMaker big time - they were down the street - cool software. It was growing and we made it a company standard. The pc managers got a copy and both sides of the building were happy.
It was great as I could import HPGL plots from my HP scopes and network analyzer machines and do reports. Not much supported that plot file structure.
Martin
Larry Jaques wrote:

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Apple was still using Frame at least 2004 for documentation, but TIFF was never a web graphic format, Martin.
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On Sat, 14 Nov 2009 00:47:54 -0600, Dave Balderstone

http://1997.webhistory.org/www.lists/www-talk.1994q4/0717.html
Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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On Sat, 14 Nov 2009 00:47:54 -0600, Dave Balderstone

http://1997.webhistory.org/www.lists/www-talk.1994q4/0797.html Regards,
Tom Watson http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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Those said it was but wasn't the thing for the web. It was a raw format not a movie format or a wiggle format or low byte count format for wireless and phones..... Frame is still available - I started in 87 or 88.
Wingz was a bout the same time - a very powerful spreadsheet that was able to do simulations and modeling based on logic.
Martin
Tom Watson wrote:

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