Pine Flooring

Hi All....
Hoping those of you with some experience can help...I'm working a building a small workshop (10 x 10 stand alone outdoor building) and was thinking of using 1 x 6 pine boards to cover the floor (which is currently 1/2" OSB over 2 x 8 joists) I was planning to leave an intentional gap between the boards which would then be filled with either mortar, concrete or a silicon based product.
Thoughts..anyone.
Cheers
Jay
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Mortar and 'crete will come out as the floor flexes and the wood moves. I'd just lay 'em tight over the OSB.
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On 11 Jan 2004 20:12:07 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@shaw.ca (Jay) wrote:

why?
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Well my guess would be because its a very nice look. There is an antique shop down the road from me that did their floors this way, also distressing them at the same time. Looks really good and you would be hard pressed to believe the floors arent original 100 year old floors. They used a black grout I assume with some expanding properties to fill the gaps of about 3/8" or so. Distressed the floors, then went over them with a warm honey colored stain. Very impressive to say the least.
Jim

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distressing
3/8"
colored
Being a remodeler, I've run into that black grout before - it's pretty impressive stuff just not available anymore. The oldtimer formula for making it at home is: Lay pine floor tightly. Use it hard, make lots of marks for that distressed look. When the boards shrink, sweep it regularly - leaving the dirt in the gaps. Make it shiny! Try that new floor finish - pollyuue...?? um poly. Apply it over everything, including the dirt in the grooves. Every twenty years or so freshen it up by sanding (optional) and applying some more of that polly stuff. Make sure you leave the dust in the grooves too!
The key here is the sand/dirt - really makes for a durable wear surface (I've run a router down a few of those grooves, so I know:)

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distressing
3/8"
colored
I really think you have answered your own question. You're building a WORKSHOP and the floor you like is in an ANTIQUE STORE. To me the two are diametrically opposed. Want a similar look without the stress, put down T-111
Dave
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David Babcock responds:

Not the hot set-up unless you want to replace the floor every 4-5 years.
He might try SYP t&g flooring. That will quickly gain an antique look if left unfinished for a reasonable period of time.
Charlie Self If God had wanted me to touch my toes he would have put them higher on my body.
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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On 11 Jan 2004 20:12:07 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@shaw.ca (Jay) wrote:

How hard is the grade of pine you're planning on ?

Why ?
I'd consider tonguing and grooving them, just to keep draughts down.

I have no idea how to reliably fill gaps between floorboards. No matter what you use, there's always a problems with shrinkage and gaps forming. Mortar certainly won't, PVA glue and sawdust shrinks over time. -- Do whales have krillfiles ?
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As funny as it seems I was asking the same question to our local wood craft suppliers and I never got the answer we were looking for.( My wife and I are restoring a 120+ years old house and the pine floor has 10" + boards) and as they have shrunk we have been left with up 1/2" gaps between them. While watching a home reno show called "Ask This Old House" They had a viewer ask this same question and the answer they gave was what we were looking for because it is what the old timers did to fix their gaps. Take burlap rope and soak in stain to almost the same color as your floor after drying the rope off, push this rope into the gap it will take some force . You may have to change dia. of the rope as the gap distance changes but it is a very good solution as it will expand and contract with the pine. Hope this helps you as it did us.
Tim Smith
(Jay) wrote:

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: Hi All....
: Hoping those of you with some experience can help...I'm working a : building a small workshop (10 x 10 stand alone outdoor building) and : was thinking of using 1 x 6 pine boards to cover the floor (which is : currently 1/2" OSB over 2 x 8 joists) I was planning to leave an : intentional gap between the boards which would then be filled with : either mortar, concrete or a silicon based product.
: Thoughts..anyone.
: Cheers
: Jay
Hi Jay,
Well...if you really want to fill those gaps, the obvious choice is boat caulk. Sikaflex is one. There are others. They come in the tubes you use with caulking guns. You can ge it in a few colors. black, dark brown, white.
It's designed to flex with planke movement in carvel planked boats. Wood will move during sailing or when the boat is hauled for the season and the planks shrink during winter.
If you choose to use this stuff there are a few tricks. If you get it on yoru clothes it's there for good. If you get it on the wood surface you'll have to plane the surface.
so what some people do is to lay masking tape on either side of the gap. With this stuff, to get the caulk down into the gap, you PUSH the caulking gun. Not pull.
Then after you've caulked the gap you can run somethign like a popsicle stick end and take out some of the caulk. This will leave a slight depression in the caulk. When the planks swell, the depression becomes level.
Naturally you only use that trick if you are laying the floor during the dry months.
After caulking then you lift the tape.
If I lay wide pine flooring in my kitchen this is what I will do. I don't want spilled food to get into the cracks. Best of luck
--- Gregg
My woodworking projects:
Replicas of 15th-19th century nautical navigational instruments:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/backstaffhome.html
Restoration of my 82 year old Herreshoff S-Boat sailboat:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/SBOATrestore.htm
Steambending FAQ with photos:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/Steambend.htm
"Improvise, adapt, overcome." snipped-for-privacy@head-cfa.harvard.edu Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Phone: (617) 496-1558
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Lay 'em tight. Get to work. WL

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: Lay 'em tight. : Get to work. : WL
If he lays them tightly in the Winter, he may have a serious problem in the summer. If he lays them tighly in the Summer, he'll have gaps in the Winter.
--- Gregg
My woodworking projects:
Replicas of 15th-19th century nautical navigational instruments:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/backstaffhome.html
Restoration of my 82 year old Herreshoff S-Boat sailboat:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/SBOATrestore.htm
Steambending FAQ with photos:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/Steambend.htm
"Improvise, adapt, overcome." snipped-for-privacy@head-cfa.harvard.edu Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Phone: (617) 496-1558
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Are you recommending a "modified stationary panic" for our OP? ;)

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HAHAHAHAHAHAHA well I don't know since I have no idea what yer talkin' about ;^)
: Are you recommending a "modified stationary panic" for our OP? ;)
: :> Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics :> Phone: (617) 496-1558 :>
--


--- Gregg
"Improvise, adapt, overcome."
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snipped-for-privacy@shaw.ca (Jay) wrote in message
<snip>

Small gaps are fine, fillers are not. If you want to avoid drafts, then use an underlayer.
H.
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