Pin Nailer review.

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I'll look and see. I'm not the best at taking pics of my work, but I might actually have some of that. If I do, I'll ping you.
Robert
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A question about pin nailing in regards to fine furniture. It's hard for me to visualize the size of a 23 gauge pin hole. I have looked at online images, but seeing in person will tell me everything I need to know. (something I'll be doing later this month when I visit my favourite tool dealer).
Pinning trim on fine furniture. Do you fill the holes? Does the mere act of finishing fill the hole beyond cursory examination? Do you use some other non-pinned method to hold trim in place while you permanently attach it?
Obviously, all these questions are a precursor to my buying a pin nailer. I'm mid way between the wanting stage and the knowing I need one stage.
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On 2/19/2012 9:17 PM, Dave wrote:

Take a straight pin, poke it through a sheet of paper. There is your hole. 90% of the time you do not need to fill the holes especially if you are working in an obvious grained wood and or plan to stain. If working with white birch or maple you might want to putty the holes.
I find that I use my pinner more and more, It is great for building jigs, the wood does not move when you shoot the pins and there is basically no recoil. And compared to most all other nails, pins are inexpensive.
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On 2/19/2012 10:17 PM, Dave wrote:
>> A follow up to my comments about my Grex pinner. I have had the pinner >> almost 5 years. > > A question about pin nailing in regards to fine furniture. It's hard > for me to visualize the size of a 23 gauge pin hole. I have looked at > online images, but seeing in person will tell me everything I need to > know. (something I'll be doing later this month when I visit my > favourite tool dealer).
I finally broke down and bought a pin nailer, even though I rarely use nails in my shop. It has some value in making jigs and such, but I made jigs for many years without a nail gun. I bought a cheap gun that doubles as a stapler from HF. I figured the stapler would be good for upholstery, something I do about once every 15 years. The cheap gun works fine, except besides the pin hole, the hammer also makes a little obscene dent in the wood. I assume more expensive guns don't do this. When I first got the gun, I used it for several things instead of clamps for gluing stuff. No good, it was easy but left the dents and pin holes (18g) and more than once I bitched at myself for even buying the thing. I've learned not to use it when inappropriate, which for me is most of the time. Works great for rough cut bird houses though:-)
> Pinning trim on fine furniture. Do you fill the holes? Does the mere > act of finishing fill the hole beyond cursory examination? Do you use > some other non-pinned method to hold trim in place while you > permanently attach it?
I think they would be ideal for a trim carpenter, and you could paint the trim w/o filling the holes/dents. Fine furniture, nope, stay away from any sort of nail gun where possible. Norm was a fool and was selling nail guns. No way you could get away with what he did on fine furniture. I guess you could use them on cabinet backs. I built a 12' railing for an outside, second floor balcony for someone and used the gun for pining the baluster spacers down, that was great. Also a garden bench where I used spaces for the back slats in the top rail, also great for that. Fine furniture, no.
> Obviously, all these questions are a precursor to my buying a pin > nailer. I'm mid way between the wanting stage and the knowing I need > one stage.
BTDT. Just go buy one and get it over with.
--
Jack
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I was already to buy a pin nailer until I heard about the Cadex pin nailers. With their nailer that can shoot slightly headed pins and regular pins, I'm having second thoughts about the brand of pin nailer I was going to buy.
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I think it would depend on how much I would use it. I don't use mine much, so the HF model I paid $12 for was a real bargain when it was on sale. I bought their 3/4" pins at the same time and I was under $20 for both including tax.
I would be pissed if I had a $200 Cadex that sat for a few month at a time with no use.
Robert
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On 2/21/2012 2:48 PM, Dave wrote:

I just used mine today, pinning the back of basement shelving unit on. The HF also shoots slightly headed pins as well as staples. The first two I managed to shoot through the side of the case. This seldom/never happens with nails. I only had a 3/8 rabbit for the back, and if your not used to using the nailer because you seldom use the damn thing, it's easy to miss where the nail will go the first couple of shots.
I don't think I'd let an air nailer within 20 miles of any fine furniture I was making. Norm seemed to stab everything in site... Camera's hide a ton of garbage I say.
I can tell you for sure I'm glad I bought the cheap ass HF tool, it works fine for as much as I use it. If I were a finish carpenter, I -might- buy a better one for durability, but I don't know how durable this one is, it seems decent, but it's so cheap money wise it's hard to think it would last with daily use. The only time it ever jammed on me was when I switched over from pins to staples to test it out. I think I had a staple try to shoot the same time as a pin, something like that. You have to take it apart to clear a jam. I think other ones have better methods, but not sure. Also, mine seems to need 60 psi to shoot, any less and no go. I generally shoot around 75 to 80.
--
Jack
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On Wed, 22 Feb 2012 07:23:25 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

When aim counts, hold a couple pieces of scrap together, put a single pencil dot on one, put the tip on that, fire once, and look at the relationship. Now you know precisely how far away from the tip the pin comes out. Better yet, draw the profile of the pinner's tip on the scrap piece for later reference. Drill a hole and use a nylon tie strip to bind it to the trigger guard to keep it with the gun.
-- Every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving. -- Albert Einstein
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On 2/22/2012 10:27 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Good advice. When I pinned the face frame on the shelves, I forced myself to shoot a practice shot into scrap wood, and it went exactly where I aimed it. I think with the back I was not just not careful, I also angled the gun a tad to make sure it didn't come out inside the case. Of course, it came out outside the case. That of course pissed me off so I angled it a tad the other way, and of course, it came out inside the case. After I was done being stupid, all was well.
Anyway, it's just some utility shelving for the garage the wife wanted, and I made it out of scrap stuff, so wasn't too worried. I may never shoot another pin through the side of a case, but I wouldn't bet on it.
I never shot a nail through the side of anything before I got this air gun:-) They are a bit too much fun to use, and I find myself looking for things to nail when one is in my hands.
--
Jack
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On 2/21/2012 1:48 PM, Dave wrote:

Actually if I needed something that shot a headed fastener I would use a brad nailer. IMHO a headed pin defeats the purpose.
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wrote:

Don't the pins hold a wee bit better, anyway, from the heat-activated epoxy coating?
-- Every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving. -- Albert Einstein
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