Picnic table plan advice

Hey all,
I know this may be a little simpler than most of the queries here, but I am looking for a little design advice for an idea for a picnic table for my deck.
I have a 16'x20' deck whici I built a few years back with 2 connecting sides of the deck edged with built in benches.
I am interested in creating an 8 foot diameter round picnic table which separates into two separate tables which each can be used on their own.
Here is my draft mockup of the table(s)
http://www.chefjuke.com/pics/juketable.jpg
The idea is to be able to use the semi-circle tables along the side benches for smaller gatherings but when there are more folks over, they would be able to sit at one table and all see each other. If I JUST made a large circular table in the center, it seems like it would just dominate the deck and reduce the usefulness of the side benches.
My main design considerations that I am looking for input on areare..
Creating a leg configuration which is sturdy but not so bulky so that the legs get in the way when the table sections are connected
an effective way to connect the two sections securely so that the whole unit isn't too wobbly or uneven.
Thanks in advance
-Chef Juke "EVERYbody Eats when they come to MY house!" http://www.chefjuke.com
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Great idea.
Will the straight section of the split top overhang the apron? If not, the two aprons could just be bolted together with a couple of carriage bolts and wing nuts. If the top overhangs, the same thing can be done with a removable block for each bolt that fills the gap between the aprons. The blocks be bolted to the inside of the aprons when the table is split. That will keep the blocks and bolts from getting lost.
Bed rail connectors could probably be used too, but being made for indoor use they would be prone to rust.
If the deck is very level and the tables heavy enough that they don't bounce around you won't really have to lock them together.
--
FF


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wrote:

The 'will' part is what I am working on now. It CAN, if I determine I want it to. The more I think about this, the more I realize that what I want to make is really just two identical semicircle tables. Each table needs
that each need to have a leg structure that is strong but stays out of the way of folks legs
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(sorry, I'm at work this morning and using friggn googlegroups and must have hit the wrong key sequence which sent the last message prematurely)
I was saying that each table needs to have a leg structure that is strong but stays out of the way of folks legs, and some way to secure to the other table (this one is actually fairly easy...any number of latches could work)
The reason I want the tables to latch is more to keep them from separating (or just making sure the surface is even where they mate) so if someone bumps or pushes against the table, we don't lose a platter of corn, or whathaveyou.
-Chef Juke
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Go here: http://www.twistedknotwoodshop.com / and download the software for picnic tables.
It could be very helpful for this project.
Chef Juke wrote:

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On Mon, 11 Aug 2008 19:32:16 GMT, Pat Barber

Actually the patio table software is more to the style I am looking at, but unfortunately doesn't have enough flexibility in the leg options to show me what I need. -Chef Juke "EVERYbody Eats when they come to MY house!" http://www.chefjuke.com
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Clearly three legs per half is a minimum and probably adequate but four or more would work too so long as there is one at each corner of the half-tables.
More challenging alternatives would be a split pedestal, or two pedestals, each approximately centered on the halves. I don't think I'd even try that.
--
FF



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On Sun, 10 Aug 2008 09:03:36 -0700 (PDT), Fred the Red Shirt

My thought was three legs per 1/2 table laid out in a triangular pattern with one leg near each of the two corners where the table split and one centered near the apex of the curved side.
Now I just have to figure out the best type and design of those legs and stretchers. -Chef Juke "EVERYbody Eats when they come to MY house!" http://www.chefjuke.com
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How about two trestle legs per each semi-circle, with the trestles facing the middle of a full circle and joined by crossed stretchers when you want to join the table into a full circle? Each semi-circle should be able to stand by itself with two trestles.
I've uploaded a suggested image to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking.
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What about a drop leaf design with a swing out leg ?That is simular to one I built. Jerry
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