Perhaps a little too much wood?

http://gizmodo.com/5909847/you-have-never-seen-so-much-wood-in-your-entire-life
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from the subject line, I thought you were touting Viagra.
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Certainly hope that some of this wood makes it over this way. It would be a shame for all that wood to rot. Without a plan that's what will happen.
I have never seen something like this, why are they watering the logs. To prevent checking? Another reason?
On 5/19/2012 2:40 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

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On 5/19/2012 2:01 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

Preservation of the wood quality (discoloration) during storage is the primary reason, particularly with regard to fungal growth, which starts quickly in warmer weather unless the sawn logs are kept wet, and above a certain moisture content in storage, while awaiting milling.
Back in the old days logs were kept in "log ponds" for the reasons above, but now it is commonly done in large milling operations with sprinklers to keep the logs stored properly and maintain quality. Also has a mitigating effect on pests, and of course, fire, which is an ever present danger.
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I thought the log ponds were just for movement.
I didn't realize that it was to prevent fungal growth.
With millons of cubic feet would they really be able to keep it wet enough? The size of those piles indicates that is no small task for 1 pile
On 5/19/2012 3:28 PM, Swingman wrote:

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They may have selected the storage areas nearest a stream or lake to capture the runoff and recycle the water.
Wonder if the locals can purchase logs or lumber at some discount. I suppose they are stacking the logs as per specie, rather than randomly. Seems, at least, they can access the downed logs conveniently. After Mt. St. Helens, I understood many of those downed logs were inaccessible.
Sonny
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On 5/19/2012 5:58 PM, Sonny wrote:

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On 5/19/2012 3:48 PM, tiredofspam wrote:

I got a VIP tour of a large sawmill operation in Arkansas about ten years ago and that is the way it was explained to me.
Here, just found these that explain some of it:
http://ukpmc.ac.uk/abstract/AGR/IND20462424/reload=0 ;jsessionidW2LT9F3GRDAiHTI9U7.148
http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/techline/storage-of-softwood-logs.pdf
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And blue stain can develope if freshly sawn lumber is not stickered properly. One batch of shortleaf pine, I had, developed blue stain even though I stickered it well. The problem was I didn't spray or brush off the coating of sawdust remaining on the lumber and the blue stain developed under the sawdust. I reasoned the sawdust prevented proper drying.
After hurricanes, I would often collect certain logs and have them milled. I would hose (water) the stickered boards for the first few weeks of stickering. After those first few weeks, I allowed the air drying to do what it may.
Sonny
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Thanks.
On 5/19/2012 6:45 PM, Swingman wrote:

http://ukpmc.ac.uk/abstract/AGR/IND20462424/reload=0 ;jsessionidW2LT9F3GRDAiHTI9U7.148
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What a prototype! When Hurricanes hit East Texas, the Bio-Mass electric plants sprouted all about. There is enough wood down to have constant fires for 5 years if burning in the field. With the flack of smoke like that - the plants were authorized and are running. The forest fires feed them also. The scorched or burnt trees are not good wood pulp for paper or for making planks. Splits and hard resin make it unrealistic to mill.
Massive grinder machines chew up logs and stumps dumping out chips. Chips are burned in the Bio-Mass power plants.
Thanks - we often don't see stuff like that elsewhere in the world.
Martin
On 5/19/2012 11:18 AM, Dave wrote:

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