performax sander question

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For those of you with teh 16/32 and 22/44 sanders, I have a question. I read a fine woodworking article from a while back talking about the 16/32 and some other sanders. It says that for the open-ended sanders, when you sand a wide board in two passes, you have to readjust the drum so that it's no longer parallel with the table. That is, you have to make the drum farther from the table at the open end than it is at the closed end, thus creating an artificial crown in the board. The article says that if you don't do this, you end up with a 1/32" groove where open end of the drum is. Is this true? The article looks like it's a number of years old. Did they fix this? I'd hate to readjust the drum parallelness when switching between wide and narrow boards.
brian
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Great... I thinking of getting one, solved the electricity problem, and now you bring this up. :~) I suppose that would be good to know. I wonder if the article discover this situation or if the owners manual mentions this.
As an extra question, Does any one have the 10-20? I am seriously considering that one also.
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Leon wrote:

Same here... Brian got my attention! <G>
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Leon wrote:

Which electricity problem?
I was planning on getting the 22/44 (after moving the shop now :-P ). But after reading about this, I may have to spend the extra money and get a closed-end sander. I'm not liking that idea though because it means that I would just about have to double (or more) the price to get one with the same 44" capacity. I *really* want to be able to sand table tops. This is enough of an issue to make me compromise on the width though. My shop time is really limited. And drum sanders are already fussy without this thrown in.
brian
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The 16-32 and larger requires a 20 amp circuit. I thought I only had a single 15 amp circuit in my garage until I checked the breaker box and discovered the single 20 amp circuit for the washing machine. I was not aware that that outlet was separate and 5 amp higher capacity.
I do not mind sanding the occasional large surface and most of my furniture has panels around 18 inches wide. I mostly want the drum sander for sanding small box parts and inlay. According to Performax the pieces being sanded can be as short as 2-1/2" long.
Where have you seen a closed end sander with 44" capacity for only twice as much money? Most that I have seen start in the 3 to 4 thousand dollar range.
Additionally , take a look at the Performax site and pull up the PDF manual. IIRC there is an actual adjustment knob for making this adjustment after loosening a few cap screws. This may only be a few minute adjustment.
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"Leon" wrote in message

furniture
sanding
Leon, my advice is to buy the biggest you can find ... I may need the extra width when I come over to use it! ;)
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Ironic how find and afford are in conflict with each other all the time. :~)
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On Mon, 13 Nov 2006 16:47:50 GMT, "Leon"

For small parts, I'd take a serious look at building one yourself. For short boards you really don't need a conveyor. Quite happy with mine so far, though there's been a bump or two along the way. Save quite a bit of money building it, and you can use a 220v motor to solve your no longer existing electrical problem. But it's the sort of thing that will pay for itself no matter how much you spend.
It's small, too small for me, but you might also take a look at the Byrnes sander that I modeled a lot of mine on.
http://www.byrnesmodelmachines.com/sander.html?id_mm 05MM362063
6 inch width, little over 1" max thickness. The one reservation I have about recommending it would be that I emailed the guy about custom building one with greater max thickness and got no reply. But it seems like an excellent machine.
-Leuf
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wrote:

Snip
Yeah that might be a bit small. Thanks for reminding me about the home built sanders. Actually IIRC ShopNotes recently had an issue covering building your own and using the TS to power it. That would not work for me since I am using a cabinet saw but I could probably have it run independently with its own motor.
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On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 00:54:54 GMT, "Leon"

It's not a complicated machine. My experience:
http://krtwood.com/sander.html
The only thing I need to add is that the shaft decided it wanted to move on me, 4 set screws be damned. I didn't file a flat for them as I didn't think there was much of anything that would make the shaft want to go side to side. And the set screws fouled up the shaft to the point I can't get the bearings off it to file it now. I added in a spacer between the drum and bearing and that keeps it from going in the direction it kept wanting to go before. Oh, also had to lock another nut against the cap nut on the height adjuster to keep it from unthreading when lowering the table.
Some of my experience goes against a lot of the prevailing wisdom, mainly the support of the table at the front and the motor mounting, but those seem to work fine for everyone else.
-Leuf
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Mine is still fairly new, but having read a lot of reviews I got the impression that most problems people were having were caused by not understanding how the machine needed to be set up, which isn't difficult. My experience so far when working under 26" is that if its set up correctly you dond have to change anything other then the angle of the board when you feeed it in.
Mike M
On Mon, 13 Nov 2006 16:47:50 GMT, "Leon"

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I think a lot of problems come from trying to use it as a planer. I got it to use for resawing primarily and its done great so far. Mike M
On Mon, 13 Nov 2006 16:47:50 GMT, "Leon"

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wrote:

I think you need to do an economics evaluation.
First, how many >32" wide pieces are you ever going to sand? If it's less than even two dozen over the course of maybe 20 years of woodworking, how can you justify the huge machine?
Next, by your own admission, you have "really limited" shop time. Now how many >32" pieces are you going to be sanding?
Finally, even that big, $10,000 Timesavers sander Norm has in The New Yankee Workshop is only a 36" (and which, by the way, is almost assuredly a 3-phase machine). Do you think you're going to be able to find a sander with more capacity for significantly less money?
For the very few times you need that capacity, you'd be far better off either renting time on a sander in a commercial shop (if possible) or just subbing it out outright (The Hardwood Connection out in Sycamore--west of town on 64 just past Peace Rd) has a widebelt sander and would probably do it under those conditions).
Save your money and your space for things you'll use more often and are less upfront dollars (and that won't take up space all out of proportion to their use).
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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LRod wrote:

Shhhh, swmbo may be reading this thread. :-)

It's limited for now. My hope is that I'll be using these machines for decades. That may be unrealistic. But I think it's a worthy goal.
You're right, I can't really justify it. I'm just worried about paying $2000 (for example) for a 24" machine when I can pay $2500 for a 32" machine. That may be unrealistic. There's a sweet spot somewhere I haven't identified. I guess my goal is to get as much drum sander as I can for $2500 or less. Once it goes over that price, I start getting flak from the accountant. I still need to do a lot more research.
Originally, I had decided on the 22/44 since it would do 22" wide boards just fine, and had a way to do the large boards when I may occasionally need that. Only now there's (maybe) a price to be paid for that extra feature. This has also got me thinking again about motor size, dual drums, flat drum vs velcro, and all that stuff. For about $1800, it looks like grizzly has one that's 23.5", but has two drums and 5hp vs 1.5hp on the peformax. I have to wonder which machine I would be happier with. It seems like you get a lot more with the griz for the extra $500.
http://www.grizzly.com/products/G1066Z

His machine is a wide belt sander. I'm looking for a drum sander, mainly because of cost. And while I'd love to have a wide belt sander like that one, it's a production machine. And that's really a case of can't justify the cost. Besides, with a machine like that I start to running out of subpanel and dust collector, even (or maybe especially) if it were single phase.

You're right of course. Maybe I've become obsessive compulsive about cry once. :-)
brian
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brianlanning wrote:

I seldom sand things that are so wide that I have to flip them.
Usually, I plane the boards, run them through the sander, glue them up, and then touch up with a random orbital sander to make up for any minor goofs in glue up alignment.
On the rare occasions that I have done the "flip", I don't change the table adjustment. It's a huge PITA to get that table level, so I'm not going to touch that setting. I flip it and then touch up with a ROS.
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ME2
Keeping the open end a tad down (64th) seems to take care of the flex in the cantilever design, producing uniform thickness pieces.
Perhaps the reason for suggesting the tip up is that it's a lot easier to take away wood in the middle of nowhere than add it....
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I agree with George. With the cantilever design the outside needs to be slightly lower to account for a very small amount of flex in the open ended design. My 16/32 works great. This is a sander not a thicknesser. If you don't try to sand to deep and to fast you will have very little clean up. Everybody (including me) wants to hurry up and get finished with the sanding because the finished project is almost ready and the freakin' sanding is holding up the show when the truth is if you take your time sanding the "show" will be better. Robert
George wrote:

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Knotbob wrote:

Not to mention that IT'S FREAKIN' SANDING! <G>
I totally agree about taking your time, but does _anyone_ actually enjoy sanding?
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"B A R R Y" wrote in message

The warm fuzzies would pontificate it's not the destination, it's the journey ... BS! Sanding is a lot like having to do all that you have to go through just to get laid ... IIRC.
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So if you are of the female persuasion you may enjoy sanding more than the typical man? :~)
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