pennies prevent rust? what say ye?

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Had a friend tell me that if you put a couple pennies in each drawer of your toolbox, the tools won't rust. It has something to do with the copper absorbing moisture? I don't see how this works, but an ounce of prevention... (or actually about 20 cents of prevention).
Anyone hear of this? Old husbands tale or scientific fact?
Frank
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Come by my house and try it first. First off, pennies are mostly zinc-extremely little copper. Maybe you have to go buy some wheat pennies to do it properly. Better ask him first. Sute hate for you to screw up a good thing just you "cheaped out" and used a new penny.
On Tue, 02 Dec 2003 15:24:14 GMT, "Frank Ketchum"

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Hmm - you're contradicting NASA.
Penny Facts: 1. The composition was pure copper from 1793 to 1837.
2. From 1837 to 1857, the cent was made of bronze (95 percent copper and 5 percent tin and zinc).
3. From 1857, the cent was 88 percent copper and 12 percent nickel, giving the coin a whitish appearance.
4. The cent was again bronze (95 percent copper and 5 percent tin and zinc) from1864 to 1962. In 1943, the coin's composition was changed to zinc-coated steel. This change was only for the year 1943 and was due to the critical use of copper for the war effort. However, a limited number of copper pennies were minted that year.
5. In 1962, the cent's tin content, which was quite small, was removed. That made the metal composition of the cent 95 percent copper and 5 percent zinc.
On the other hand - the US Mint supports your assertion that the current circulating pennies are copper clad Zinc. Maybe this happened after 1963...
Damned web...
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Make that "US penny facts". Other countries pennies can be different compositions.
Mike
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On Tue, 02 Dec 2003 20:52:07 GMT, "Michael Daly"

Canuckistani penny facts from the Royal Canadian Mint web site:
Today's one cent coin, modified in 2000, is made of copper plated steel (94% steel, 1.5% nickel, 4.5% copper). From 1997 until 2000, it was made of copper plated zinc. Prior to 1997 the one cent coin was 98% copper, 1.75% zinc and .25% other metals.
Luigi Replace "no" with "yk" for real email address
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wrote:

Same for the UK.
Like many people, I throw my copper change in a jar. Except that I have two jars, one just for the non-magnetic stuff. Then I use it as casting bronze, because it's cheaper than buying it.
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On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 04:25:39 +0000, Andy Dingley

Did you guys switch to the Euro without me noticing. I thought you still had pence, not cents. ;-)

I gave up on saving pennies a long time ago. I try to get rid of them ASAP. I do keep my loonies and toonies (one and two dollar Canadian coins, Keith) in a mineral water bottle. After a year or so, I have a nice stash to buy something with. But then, I don't feel the need to have metal on hand so that I can cast bronze when the urge takes me.
Luigi Replace "no" with "yk" for real email address
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They are still great shot pin washers! Don't drill them or anything, just shoot through them. Copper over zinc holds up great, even outside.
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And it changed to copper-plated zinc in 1982. Composition is currently 97.6% Zn, 2.4% Cu.
http://www.treasury.gov/education/fact-sheets/currency/lincoln-cent.html
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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FWIW Cool experiment the chem teacher in the classroom next to mine had his students do. Take a copper clad penny and, using a triangular file, file several holes through the copper on the edge around the periphery of the penny. Place in glass beaker and cover well with muriatic(hydrochloric) acid( IIRC they used about 50 ml.). Careful of the fizz. Let set a day or so. If all goes as planned, the acid will 'eat out' the zinc inside and you have a hollow penny.
Larry
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Or build a nice fast pulse generator and shrink the penny shirt button size...
http://ffden-2.phys.uaf.edu/211.fall2000.web.projects/r.pace /!shrinking.html
-Bruce

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Bruce Rowen wrote:

Too cool! But in either case, I think it's illegal to deface money.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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Oh damn, all of those pennies I have used for shot pin washers will put me in Levenworth. ;-)
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On Wed, 03 Dec 2003 00:17:23 -0500, Silvan

nope. it's just illegal to try to spend it after you do.
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I didn't remember this guys name until I saw this link. About a year ago, I was in a Supertronics store. I walked up to the counter and he was there talking to the clerk. He gave the clerk one of those quarters and told him to give it to the owner. After he left, I asked the clerk about it and he said that the owner knew this guy and had been promised one of his quarters the next time he did it. There was a digital scale there and we weighed it. It was so close to the weight of a standard quarter that manufacturing variation could account for the difference. The quarter was indeed smaller in diameter as shown in the picture but it was somewhat thicker than normal.

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CW wrote:

Any reason why it works on a quarter as opposed to something else, or does it work on a variety of things?
Not that I would ever get motivated to build one of those things anyway, mind you.
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It'll work on most any metal. The _huge_ magnetic field crushes the material. The items are still the same volume (no increase in density) but the illusion is cool! It's a one shot deal however, the magnetic coil explodes like a small bomb when it is hit with the current. -Bruce
Silvan wrote:

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Bruce Rowen wrote:

Hmmm... Explosions are fun.
Well, they *can* be fun. Depends on where they happen I guess. :)
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No particular reason for the quarter. That's just what he used.

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1963...
You don't believe in first hand experience? Hit one with a file and see the zinc.
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