PC 894PK Router Suitability

I am considering purchasing this router and would appreciate any of your input on its suitability for my intended purpose. The router is 2.25 hp and comes with a Gripvac fixed base (a variant to the D handle) and a plunge base. I am new to router tables and cutting raised panels, but I anticipate using it for typical router table work including cutting raised panels and styles and rails. I also anticpate occasionally using it freehand for edge trimming and such. Finally, who do you recommend purchasing this router from? Amazon has this router $269, less $25 and free shipping. Coastal has it for $269 less $40 plus shipping ~ $8. Thanks for any advice any of you can provide. Gary
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Gary wrote:

handheld router. Enough power to use all but the biggest bits yet not too overly heavy to be hard to use handheld. Buy from a local store because sooner or later your going to want more accessories like an edge guide, template guides, etc and those things are low priced as to where shipping isn't worthwhile so if you keep the local guy in business you can just swing by and pick up the accessories rather than pay to have them shipped from an online dealer. I'm using the gripvac base in a homemade table simply bolted to 3/4" MDF as there is enough depth control to make up for the 3/4" lost due to the table thickness and the gripvac is my table's dust collection.
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First off I would recommend getting a more powerful router if you are going to be cutting raised panels with horizontal bits.
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in the table all of the time. Once you get set up to properly use the 'big router' for raised panels and other table tasks, resetting it for other uses is a PITA. Much more time wasted than even the hobbyist will appreciate.
I have a Freud 2000e for my table. Others praise the Hitachi MV12 series. Neither exceeds $200 in price.
My other routers are a PC690 variable speed, and a PC 7310 trimmer. Old school, solid designs, with all of the bugs worked out.
/Opinion mode on Buy locally if you can. Local government needs your tax dollars. Local retailers need your business. Amazon doesn't provide police and fire services. /Opinion mode off
Patriarch
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And if you decide to go that route, I'd say that you might want something else for a plunge router. The 890 plunge base sucks IMHO.
Mike
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Michael Daly wrote:

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Eugene said:

Well, as for mine, the plunge posts are bushed on one side with a bronze sintered bushing, but the other side has a plastic guide. I get a fair amount of diagonal bit deflection when pressing down on the plunge base handles even slightly. The plunge lock has been readjusted 5 times since purchased. You'll know it need adjusting again when the base suddenly pops all the way out when lifting it from a work piece. The depth limiter rod does not want to stay in position unless you REALLY crank down on the lock knob - which I hesitate to do because of the rod's soft aluminum construction.
I use the fixed base in a router table, and the "above the table" height adjustment (worm) on the fixed base is made of plastic and is wearing as we speak. The rack on the router is plastic as well. It is difficult to make height adjustments because the bit shifts when tightening the base after adjustment - trial and error procedures are necessary to get the bit set to the final depth.
You also have to physically turn the router switch off before changing bits, because it has a lockout tang that prevents you from engaging the spindle lock when the switch is on. The is fine (and safe) for handheld use, but for use in a router table with an external switch, this bites. The collet spindle will not extend above a 1/4" thick router plate sufficiently to use two wrenches. The spindle hole and lock pin are already showing signs of metal deformation from using the spindle lock.
The ball bearings and housings are Chinese - as is the armature. The speed controller is made in Holland. The unit is bolted together from it's foreign component parts in the USA.
It has a nice long cord that has held up OK in the shop. the unit runs a little warm, and the armature (and collet) get quite hot with use. The depth indicator is frosted so bad you can't even see through to the scale underneath.
It has had fairly light usage for the past 8 months. I was not really impressed with my purchase. If I had it to do over again, I would opt for a better, more powerful router and a Mast-R-Lift.
FWIW,
Greg G.
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On 29-Sep-2004, Greg G. wrote:

This pretty much sums the unit up. I really wish I'd gotten a Bosch 1617 kit instead.
Mike
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If this makes you feel any better, I have owned the Bosch 1617EVS since August of 1998. Great router. BUT I have yet to see this model with the plunge base that the handles did not feel like they would fall off. Every one of the plunge bases I have handled have had loose handles.
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"patriarch snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcastDOTnet>" <<patriarch> wrote in message
<snip>

Leon, Thanks for the advice. It does make sense to buy a powerful dedicated router for the table and something like the PC690 for freehand work. (Christmas is just around the corner.) Unless I misread, isn't the Freud a single speed router, and if so isn't that a problem with big bits such as a raised panel bit?

I feel the pain of local merchants having to compete with virtual, high volume, low overhead online merchants. As for taxes, I feel that contributing 60-80% of my income is enough. (Fed income tax 25%, state income tax 6%, self employment tax 15.6%, then out of what's left I pay 5% sales tax and ~$2500 per year property tax.) oh and business personal property, state unemployment tax, federal unemployment tax, business license, etc etc.
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wrote:

mine is, but it's an older model. the current one is variable speed: http://woodworker.com/Freud_Router.htm
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<snip>

Freud FT2000EP: (Amazon.com product link shortened)/- /B0000223OO/103-8714104-1494201> Electronic variable speed, soft start, included edge guide, if you want to use it out of the table.
Patriarch, just my opinions, worth what you paid for them.
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I am not that familiar with the Hitachi other than it offers a lot of value for the money. IIRC the base has to be modified so that a large bit will fit. Newer models may have addresses this.
Now, with that in mind, adjusting a table mounted router can be a PIA. The PC 894 series router address this and IIRC you can change the bit from above the table.
Eventually you are going to want a router that can be easily adjusted with precision. The PC you mention does this IIRC but may lack in power for tougher operations. A few newer powerful routers have also addressed this. The newer big Milwaukee has this capability and the Triton can do this. There are router lifts that you can adapt to your router but these usually run 2 to 3 hundred dollars in addition to the cost of the router. I personally recently upgraded my old Bosch 3hp router to the Triton. This router is quite unique and has many nice features. To name a few, the height can be adjusted precisely while hanging under the table and the bit can be remove and replaced while hanging under the table. The bit comes far enough through the table that you can get to the collet. Just some thing to think about if you decide to mount a larger dedicated router.
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"patriarch snipped-for-privacy@nospam.comcastDOTnet>" <<patriarch> wrote in message

I ordered a Hitachi 12V from Amazon yesterday. I decided on the Hitachi because of price ($159, less a $25 promotional discount from Amazon), and it comes with an above the table adjustment knob and assessory kit. I also ordered a Rousseau Router Base Plate. In the mean time while I wait for delivery, I am deciding whether to build a dedicated router cabinet or just mount this monster into my Unisaw table.
I have owned a Ryobi 1 or 1.5 HP (?) plunge router for several years now. I suppose I'll just continue to use it for freehand work for now until I can afford a better one.
Thanks to everyone for your advice.
Gary
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it's intended to be a general purpose router. it has the balls to do the occasional panel raising and stick and cope work, but if that will be it's main use get something bigger.

that's more like it.

someone local. a real tool store, one with a service department and sales people who have a clue. the few dollars difference in price are worth it.

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