PC 690 router base question

I have been looking to get my first router. This is for occasional hobby use. I am thinking of getting either 690LR, a fixed base router ( $84) or 693LRPK, a kit with fix and plunge base($184). I have a question about the base. If I buy the 690LR fixed base router now ( to keep the cost down), can I buy only a plunge base later and mount the motor into that?
Initially I will not have a router table. Is the fixed base router useful at all without being mounted on a router table? Initially I will be doing simple dado/rabbet ( maybe dovetail if I get enough courage :-) or simple edging. No fancy paneling.
Thanks.
-Dipu
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It will cost less to buy the kit.
Lots of applications for both fixed and plunge base unit in hand held mode.
Have fun.
Lets
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I have a table. It's not a great table, but it works. You can make an approximation of a table with a straight piece of wood and two clamps. That will certainly be enough to cut dadoes and rabbets, at least for a few cuts.
I also have a jig that I use to cut dadoes with that's simple to build and cheap. It's two pieces of wood, longer than the width of board that you're dadoing. The first piece (A) is a 1x2. The second piece of wood (B) is wider than the distance from the edge of your router base to the inside edge of the bit you're using.
Screw piece A to piece B flush on one side. Measure from the INSIDE of piece A across piece B til it's about 1/4" wider than the distance from the outside of your router base to the edge of the router bit (mounted in the collet). Rip along that measured line.
Then butt the router base against the 1x2 and rout the edge you've just sawed. You now have a custom made dado jig for that size of bit. The (routed) edge of piece B will line up along the edge of your marked dado.
This takes almost longer to describe than it does to build. It's also easier to build than describe.
When you've finished, paint it bright yellow so you don't lose it.
--
Tanus

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On Dec 13, 9:04 pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

My suggestion is to buy the kit with both bases now. I purchased the 690 with only the fixed base and now regret it. It will now cost me $89 - $96 to buy the plunge base. Considering that it would only have cost me $45 more to purchase the kit when I bought the fixed based model. Yes the fixed base is very usable without a router table/cabinet for exactly what you describe, edge work and dado/rebates. Get the kit or be sorry later when you want to do any inlay, mortise work, etc.
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spend 50 bucks more and get the kit. You won't be sorry. Save up your money and buy a M12V for you router table. Once you get into WW you'll probably have 3 or 4 routers.
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wrote:

Check out e-bay, bookman. I saw a new, plunge base for about $60. - here it is but it's long ended. http://cgi.ebay.com/PORTER-CABLE-PLUNGE-ROUTER-BASE-MODEL-6931_W0QQitemZ160184203293QQihZ006QQcategoryZ20781QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
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Just buy whichever you can afford. You can search e-bay and find good deals on most everything you need later. After I got a cheep router table and router at Home Depot, I found out how useful they are I use them on every job. I still own and use it as well as a professional table with a 3 hp plunge router for big jobs, a 2 hp hand held router with soft start and variable speed control for use with jigs on specialized jobs, a trim router for 90% of the stuff I use a handheld router and a Don Allen Gunstock Duplicator with a Dewatt 616 router for carving. The duplicator is a 7 axis copier. I've got a spare router to replace the Dewatt for any time it needs servicing as well. And a big box of specialized router bits... On second thought, don't buy it. you can't imagine how much a cheep router will cost you and how much you'll use it for. LOLMAOTIP
On Thu, 13 Dec 2007 18:04:02 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

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On Thu, 13 Dec 2007 18:04:02 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

That's what I did. I was an employee, cost was minimal to split the buy, you may save quite a bit by buying the kit, however, I rarely ever put the plunge base on.

I've never mounted it in a table (qualify-I have a small shaper with a router spindle assembly). Use it all the time, mostly with the fixed base.
Frank

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Absolutely ... the 690 motor will give you a number of options. I have three of four 690 motors and more bases/cases than I can count.

Again ... absolutely. You will find a multitude of uses for a handheld router the size of the 690. Visit Pat Warner's site:
http://patwarner.com
... for some good info on bases, jigs, etc. for the ubiquitous 690 motor, among other excellent information.
Initially I

Check out Leon's adjustable dado jig ... he just reposted pictures of it on alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking this morning ... it will be an excellent companion for your 690 for handheld use.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/14/07
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Dipu, Before I got a router table, I used a straight edge to make dados and rabbits. Worked good, lasted a long time. But since I got a router table, my router stays attached to the table - mostly!
I got a set as a gift, plunge and fixed, so price was not an issue, but I have yet to use the plunge base. I make mortices with a drill and chisels, more fun anyway.
Can anyone here on the Wreck tell me what a plunge base might be used for, besides mortices???
Regards,
Rich.....
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Stopped/blind dados
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wrote:

stopped dados, sliding dovetails, and rabbets mortises slots inlays multiple, repeatable, varying depth passes (turret stop) drilling holes on large objects inside cuts, where you'll also keep the "waste" milling flat bottom cutouts
When you need a plunger, you'll NEED a plunger! <G>
Some of the operations above can be done with a fixed base, with a time, safety, or quality penalty.
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On Dec 14, 10:47 am, "Bonehenge (B A R R Y)"

Thanks for the suggestions. I guess I always used stops on the router table, or clamped stops, and just eased in the fixed base as needed. Maybe it's time to learn how to use a new tool! Regards, Rich.....
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On Thu, 13 Dec 2007 18:04:02 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

The kit sounds like the best deal. I have two routers, both fixed base. One is a PC (3.25 HP) and I use it almost exclusively in a router table--it is a bit bulky/heavy for hand use. A router table is extremely useful and I built my own. Some day I'll buy a plunge router, but have done fine for 30 years without one. Also, I'd like to own a trim router--one with a small base to get into tight spaces and is lightweight. Overall, the PC 690 is a very good choice. I like 1/2" shank bits a lot more than the 1/4" shank bits because they heat up less and seem to cut better. Save some $ for bits and only buy what you currently need and buy the best quality you can find.
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On Dec 13, 6:04 pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Get the kit!
Shop around for deals on this router that everybody sells. About 3 years ago A co-worker got one for her husband with a rebate form for a free D-handle base.
Also make sure it is variable speed.
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wrote:

That's true I got a free D handle too. I got mine from Amazon.
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Thanks a lot for all the advice and comments. Now I need to convince my wife to buy me the router for my birthday :-)
-Dipu
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There must be something she wants you to make that requires a router *wink*
--
Mike
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On Dec 13, 9:04 pm, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Buy the set if you're buying both.

That's the 693 base, which I use under my table. Needs to be unsprung or needs a jack if you want to adjust it without fighting it. Fine, once you get it set to depth. Use the depth rod and back travel limit nuts to lock it in.
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