Paste wax help!!!!


Hi - I have a problem. I just purchased an expensive coffee table. I don't know what the finish is however; I decided to protect it with a coat of furniture polish.
I used something called Behlen Blue Label Paste Wax, which I friend had. It says that it has Carnauba wax and should be used on furniture and floors.
The problem is that it came out streaked and with swirls. It looks horrible! Is there something I can do? Remove it? How?
Jenny
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Its Behlen Blue Lable paste wax. It's supposedly a good wax. Usually you can use the original wax to disolve the wax thats harden on. I would try it on a small area, put the wax on a clean cotton cloth, run it into the swirl and wipe it off as soon as possible. This should remove the swirl (and most of the wax). If this works then do the rest.
Then you can try again, or use another wax. Don't let the wax dry completly this time, simply wait 5 minutes or so. Or try Briwax.
Al Jennifer Ann wrote:

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Its Behlen Blue Lable paste wax. It's supposedly a good wax. Usually you can use the original wax to disolve the wax thats harden on. I would try it on a small area, put the wax on a clean cotton cloth, run it into the swirl and wipe it off as soon as possible. This should remove the swirl (and most of the wax). If this works then do the rest.
Then you can try again, or use another wax. Don't let the wax dry completly this time, simply wait 5 minutes or so. Or try Briwax.
Al Jennifer Ann wrote:

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Jennifer Ann wrote:

Try a test.
Apply wax to a small area. Wait a minute or two and buff -- does it look ok? If so you waited too long to buff. In that case -- you now know how to repair the mess...
Without knowing the finish, advice might be dangerous. your risk... Call the manufacturer or the store where you purchased.
Presumably you can use Varsol or similar or any paint solvent. Then again -- maybe you can't. If it was made in a modern shop it is probably a "conversion" finish -- and the only way to damage it (easily) is to physically gouge it etc.
We have a Vilas Rock Maple Dining room table -- varsol soaked rags can sit on it for a long time (a week or more) without damaging the finish. We "tested" -- by mistake. Would I do that on anything else without a test in an inconspicuous area? uh no!
Apply wax in an inconspicuous area -- wait till it dries and try a dab of solvent. See if it dissolves the wax without harming the finish. I should... ???
One of the most valuable lessons in wood working and finishing -- is _TEST_ before you do the whole job. We all learn it -- eventually.
--
Will
Occasional Techno-geek
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When wacing you need to apply very little. What you are seeing is residue of un-buffed wax. You eventually buff it out with enough elbow grease. Here is what I would do.
1. Wax is usually mixed up with a chemical called Naptha. Get a small can of Naptha at a finish supply store, probably even Home Depot and it is safe to wipe over any finish and will completly strip the wax.
2. Use a clean cloth (or 0000 steel wool if you want to renew the surface more than just wax it). Dab it in the Behlen wax (good stuff) just a bit. In circular motion, moving real fast, apply it to an area about the size of two sheets of paper until it sort dries out. Wait 5 minutes and buff it out with a terry cloth or cotton rag. Move fast enough to generate some heat and vioila! You will have a beatiful shine.
Note that waxed surfaces do not like water and will tend to show finger prints a bit easier but you can re-buff it anytime you like.
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I really recommend a woolen polishing cloth; I use old wool socks or wool flannel. Wool cuts the wax off better than cotton. May help remove the streaks. Casey

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Thank you all for your advice! I rewaxed it a small part at a time. I used my husband's buffer from the garage and it worked well. The table is beautiful!
Thanks,
Jenny
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It's all in the tools... :)
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wrote:

FWIW, Naptha is also sold as "lighter fluid", and you can get it at the gas station if, like me, you live a long way from the hardware store.
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On Wed, 15 Jun 2005 05:18:16 -0500, the opaque Prometheus

Lighter fluid, huh? I've _always_ wanted my table (and living room) to smell just like a WWII Zippo. ;)
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On Wed, 15 Jun 2005 07:39:24 -0700, Larry Jaques

or airplane fuel during WWII....
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You can not apply furniture paste wax like you are using Pledge. Put a small lump in the center of a clean cotton cleaning cloth (cloth diapers are great for this). Wrap up the lump such that there is only one layer of cloth between the lump and the wax toward the bottom of the wrapping. Rub the cloth wrapped wax on the table. The heat that is created by friction and your hand is enough to cause a small amount of wax to penetrate the cloth and be applied to the table. The idea is to use the tinniest amount of wax to wax a table that will do the job. Once the applied wax has hazed over, or just a hair before, buff the table like mad. You should only do as large a section at a time as you will be able to successfully buff before the wax gets to hard to buff.
Good Luck.

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wrote:

Buff it, and buff it, and then buff it some more. The streaks and swirls are because you put too much wax on. If it's a semi-solid wax, try putting a little in the center of a rag, rolling the rag up, and then applying it through the cloth next time.
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